Searching for: "Booker T. Washington"

  • Booker T. Washington

    In this autobiography of the former slave who became a major figure in the struggle for equal rights, Booker T. Washington recounts his triumph over the legacy of slavery, his founding of the Tuskegee Institute, and his emergence as a national spokesperson for his race. For the fifty years that followed its original publication in 1901, Up From Slavery was the most widely known book written by an African American. The life of Booker T. Washington was the embodiment of the American self-made man, and his autobiography gave voice for the first time to a vast group that had to pull itself up from nothing. The well-documented ordeals and observations of this humble and plainspoken...read more

  • Booker T. Washington

    In Character Building are thirty-seven addresses that Booker T. Washington gave before students, faculty, and guests at the Tuskegee Institute. These addresses take the form of timeless advice on a number of subjects. These talks are delivered in motivational and uplifting manner one would expect from this American Icon on education, ethics, morals, deportment, spirituality and the dignity of labor. These short talks contain sage advice fit to focus the mind and heart toward the building up of self, while never relinquishing the personal responsibility we have to one another. "Let every person get into the habit of planning every day for the comfort and welfare of others, let each one try...read more

  • Booker T. Washington

    Booker T. Washington fought his way out of slavery to become an educator, statesman, political shaper, and proponent of the "do it yourself" idea. In his autobiography, he describes his early life as a slave on a Virginia plantation, his steady rise during the Civil War, his struggle for education, his schooling at the Hampton Institute, and his years as founder and president of the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, which was devoted to helping minorities learn useful, marketable skills. He gives an account of his travels, speeches, and meetings with various leaders, including Theodore Roosevelt in the White House. Employing a didactic tone, Washington deftly sets forth his belief that the...read more

  • Booker T. Washington

    Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) was one of the most influential African American leaders of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Born a slave in Hale's Ford, Virginia, Washington moved to West Virginia after the Civil War, where he learned to read while working in a coal mine. After several years of part-time schooling, he enrolled full-time at the Hampton Institute, a secondary school for African Americans, and graduated in 1875. Washington spent the next six years teaching school in West Virginia and at Hampton before accepting an offer to start a brand new school in Tuskegee, Alabama. Washington founded what is today Tuskegee University in 1881 and spent the rest of his...read more

  • Booker T. Washington

    Character Building is a compilation of speeches, given by Mr. Booker T. Washington, to the students and staff of the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute (now known as Tuskegee University). Booker T. Washington was one of the most prominent leaders in advancing African-American civil rights. Born into slavery and freed as a young boy, he rose through the ranks of education to eventually earn his position as principal of Tuskegee. Under his guidance, the school was built, by students and for students, to give them a deeply meaningful education. Mr. Washington stressed the importance of developing oneself for life-long success. He strived to imbue in his students the highest personal...read more

  • Booker T. Washington

    Up from Slavery is the 1901 autobiography of Booker T. Washington detailing his slow and steady rise from a slave child during the Civil War, to the difficulties and obstacles he overcame to get an education at the new Hampton University, to his work establishing vocational schools - most notably the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama - to help black people and other disadvantaged minorities learn useful, marketable skills and work to pull themselves, as a race, up by the bootstraps. He reflects on the generosity of both teachers and philanthropists who helped in educating blacks and native Americans. He describes his efforts to instill manners, breeding, health and a feeling of dignity to...read more

  • Booker T. Washington

    Sowing and Reaping: The Day's Work by Booker T. Washington is a series of talks delivered to the students of the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial school located in Tuskegee, Alabama. These lectures focus on the essential principles for success for black students of that age, however, remain very relevant today. The principles contained within this audiobook remind the listener of the need for education, innovation and determination coupled with hard honest labor which leads to a flourishing and prosperous...read more

  • Booker T. Washington

    The Future of the American Negro was written to put more definite and permanent form the ideas regarding the condition of the negro. Booker T. Washington, a prominent African American leader, educator and author, articulates the importance of Industrial education. He emphasized the importance of the development of the Negro in hand and heart training, which would provide the solid foundation necessary to attain the highest form of...read more

  • Booker T. Washington

    Up From Slavery is the 1901 autobiography of Booker T. Washington detailing his slow and steady rise from a slave child during the Civil War, to the difficulties and obstacles he overcame to get an education at the new Hampton University, to his work establishing vocational schools (most notably the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama), to helping black people and other disadvantaged minorities learn useful, marketable skills and work to pull themselves, as a race, up by the bootstraps. He reflects on the generosity of both teachers and philanthropists who helped in educating blacks and native...read more

  • Booker T. Washington

    Up From Slavery is the 1901 autobiography of Booker T. Washington detailing his slow and steady rise from a slave child during the Civil War, to the difficulties and obstacles he overcame to get an education at the new Hampton University, to his work establishing vocational schools-most notably the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama-to help black people and other disadvantaged minorities learn useful, marketable skills and work to pull themselves, as a race, up by the bootstraps. He reflects on the generosity of both teachers and philanthropists who helped in educating blacks and native Americans. He describes his efforts to instill manners, breeding, health and a feeling of dignity to students....read more