Searching for: "Fyodor Dostoyevsky"

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Prince Lyov Nikolayevitch Myshkin is one of the great characters in Russian literature. Is he a saint or just naïve? Is he an idealist or, as many in General Epanchin's society feel, an 'idiot'? Certainly, his return to St. Petersburg after years in a Swiss clinic has a dramatic effect on the beautiful Aglaia, youngest of the Epanchin daughters, and on the charismatic but willful Nastasya Filippovna. As he paints a vivid picture of Russian society, Dostoyevsky shows how principles conflict with emotions - with tragic...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    A Faint Heart is a testament to the author's brilliant sense of style and subtle sense of psychology. Two men have a passionate and loving relationship but are not homosexuals. The narrative is about a young clerk who can not reconcile his own personal happiness at marrying a lovely young woman while the rest of the world is not equally as happy. He winds up institutionalized and his beloved marries another, but falls to the ground weeping when meeting his dear friend two years later. A unique story, unlike any other we know of in the literary...read more

  • Beatrix Potter

    This volume offers a contrasting selection of stories and tales from the master of psychology Fyodor Dostoyevsky and heart warming story teller Beatrix Potter. The collection includes: An Honest Thief, The Peasant Marey by Fyodor Dostoyevsky; The Tale of Peter Rabbit, The Tale of Benjamin Bunny, The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies by Beatrix Potter. Read in English,...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881) is recognised as one of the greats of Russian literature. Soon after his 1843 graduation from the School of Engineering in St. Petersburg, the young Dostoyevsky abandoned his career to devote himself to literature. He quickly became a popular, recognised author, but in the unstable political environment of the time, he was accused of conspiracy, and in 1849 he was sentenced to ten years' hard labour in Siberia. On his return from prison, he recommenced writing, this time with a new poignancy, depth of psychological insight, and vibrant character study, all drawn from his Siberian experience. "The Christmas Tree and the Wedding" is an excellent example of...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1822-1881) was Russia's greatest mystic who wrote of the contest between the rebellious uncertain human and the mystery of divine omnipresence which is revealed to the enlightened in the midst of life's bitterest wrongs and suffering. His work is defined by a pity and compassion that shines from all his writing. The Honest Thiefis one of Dostoyevsky's tale's of pity, in which he reveals that compassionate sympathy of the Russian mind for all suffering, the pure and noble conscience awakened in the spirit of a fallen man. The central relationship - between the poor peasant and the even poorer old alcoholic tramp who he has taken into his home - is beautifully described...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    First published in 1846, Fyodor Dostoyevsky's novella The Double is a classic doppelganger and the second major work published by the author. It is the story of Yakov Petrovich Golyadkin, a government clerk who believes that a fellow clerk has taken over his identity and is determined to bring about his ruin. Considered the most Gogolesque of Dostoyevsky's works, the novella brilliantly depicts Golyadkin's descent into madness in a way that is hauntingly poetic. The Double illustrates Dostoyevsky's uncanny ability at capturing the complexity of human emotion, especially the darker side of the human...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    "Crime and Punishment" is a novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky. It was first published in the literary journal "The Russian Messenger" in twelve monthly installments during 1866. It was later published in a single volume. It is the second of Dostoyevsky's full-length novels following his return from ten years of exile in Siberia. Crime and Punishment is considered the first great novel of his "mature" period of writing. "Crime and Punishment" focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Raskolnikov, an impoverished ex-student in St. Petersburg who formulates and executes a plan to kill an unscrupulous pawnbroker for her cash. Raskolnikov argues that with the...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    "The most magnificent novel ever written." Sigmund Freud "The Brothers Karamazov made a deep impression on me..." James Joyce "Dostoyevsky is the only psychologist from whom I have anything to learn." Friedrich Nietzsche The Brothers Karamazov is maybe the greatest novel of all time." Walker Percy "Dostoyevsky is one who has not only influenced me a lot, but that I have got a great deal of pleasure out of reading." William Faulkner Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky is regarded as one of the finest Russian authors of the modern era. The Brothers Karamazov was Dostoevsky's final novel, and considered by many to be his greatest. This audiobook edition of the classic is translated by...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The Gambler is a short novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky about a young tutor in the employment of a formerly wealthy Russian general. The novella reflects Dostoevsky's own addiction to roulette, which was in more ways than one the inspiration for the book: Dostoevsky completed the novella under a strict deadline so he could pay off gambling...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The Gambler is a short novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky about a young tutor in the employment of a formerly wealthy Russian general. The novella reflects Dostoevsky's own addiction to roulette, which was in more ways than one the inspiration for the book: Dostoevsky completed the novella under a strict deadline so he could pay off gambling...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The Possessed, also called Demons, is Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel about life in Russia at the end of the 19th century. In this highly political novel, Dostoevsky portrays the revolutionaries as demons or devils as they plot ruin and eventually turn on each...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    White Nights and Other Stories by Fyodor Dostoyevsky is a compilation published in 1918 by The MacMillan Company, NY (USA) and Heinemann (UK). It contains these 7 works: - White Nights - Notes from the Underground - A Faint Heart - A Christmas Tree and a Wedding - Polzunkov - A Little Hero - Mr....read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Fyodor Dostoyevsky's short masterpiece about a ranting, slightly mad civil servant. The stylistic inventiveness, and the insights into the absurdities and weakness of humans seem so fresh and incisive today that if published now (a century and a half later) Notes would be considered an avant-garde post-modernist triumph. In some ways this is a heavy text, laden with conversational philosophizing; but the vividness of the narrator make it a wonderful read, and funny. (Review by Hugh...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Belye Nochi ”White Nights” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. In this small 100kb story (though author states this is a sentimental novel) author describes in his traditional and particular way the internal world of one young lonely person. The hero’s 26 years old man, who is oriented into his internal world, who’s rather shy, and thus is in real demand of a soulful conversations and love. The action take place in the city of a real and deep sentiments and romance — Saint Petersburg, the most romantic and european city in Russia. Not only the location is important, but also a time of a day: all actions in the story take place in evening and night time — the famous time of white...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Notes from Underground is an 1864 novella by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. Notes is considered by many to be the first existentialist novel. It presents itself as an excerpt from the rambling memoirs of a bitter, isolated, unnamed narrator (generally referred to by critics as the Underground Man) who is a retired civil servant living in St. Petersburg. The first part of the story is told in monologue form, or the underground man's diary, and attacks emerging Western philosophy, especially Nikolay Chernyshevsky's What Is to Be Done?. The second part of the book is called "Àpropos of the Wet Snow," and describes certain events that, it seems, are destroying and sometimes renewing the underground man,...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Through the story of the brilliant but conflicted young Raskolnikov and the murder he commits, Fyodor Dostoevsky explores the theme of redemption through suffering. Crime and Punishment put Dostoevsky at the forefront of Russian writers when it appeared in 1866 and is now one of the most famous and influential novels in world literature. The poverty-stricken Raskolnikov, a talented student, devises a theory about extraordinary men being above the law, since in their brilliance they think "new thoughts" and so contribute to society. He then sets out to prove his theory by murdering a vile, cynical old pawnbroker and her sister. The act brings Raskolnikov into contact with his own buried...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The Brothers Karamazov (Russian: ?????? ??????????) is the final novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky, and is generally considered the culmination of his life's work. The book portrays a parricide in which each of a murdered man's sons share a varying degree of complicity. The Brothers Karamazov is a passionate philosophical novel that explores deep into the ethical debates of God, free will, and morality. It is a spiritual drama of moral struggles concerning faith, doubt, reason, and modern Russia. Since its publication, it has been acclaimed all over the world by thinkers as diverse as Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein, and Pope Benedict XVI as one of the supreme achievements in...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Notes from Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky is a sophisticated novell with extremely hard to comprehend philosophical ideas lying on the border of paranoia, orthodoxal believing of God and psychological researches on human nature. Every sentence sounds like a sort of revelation to an unprepared reader's mind and causes a deep flashback thoughts which are impossible to get rid of, which also require an immediate solution. Though it's hard to define precisely what kind of content presented in novell but one can say it is a sort of impossible mixture of traditional Dostoevsky's ideas of loneliness, ideas of internal human confilct, ideas of freedom and interhuman relationship. Reader keeps...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The Grand Inquisitor is a parable told by Ivan to Alyosha in Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel The Brothers Karamazov (1879-1880). Ivan and Alyosha are brothers; Ivan questions the possibility of a personal, benevolent God and Alyosha is a novice monk. The Grand Inquisitor is an important part of the novel and one of the best-known passages in modern literature because of its ideas about human nature and freedom, and because of its fundamental ambiguity. In the tale, Christ comes back to earth in Seville at the time of the Inquisition. He performs a number of miracles (echoing miracles from the Gospels). The people recognize him and adore him, but he is arrested by Inquisition leaders and...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Although titled The Possessed in the initial English translation, Dostoyevsky scholars and later translations favour the titles The Devils or Demons. An extremely political book, Demons is a testimonial of life in Imperial Russia in the late 19th century. As the revolutionary democrats begin to rise in Russia, different ideologies begin to collide. Dostoyevsky casts a critical eye on both the radical idealists, portraying their ideas and ideological foundation as demonic, and the conservative establishment's ineptitude in dealing with those ideas and their social consequences. This form of intellectual conservativism tied to the Slavophile movement of Dostoyevsky's day, called...read more