Searching for: "Abraham Lincoln"

  • Abraham Lincoln

    This public address, given well before his presidency, was to the Springfield Washington Temperance Society. Although it did take a stance for temperance, it stirred the waters quite significantly for its time - mainly because it criticized the ways in which temperance was handled. Rather than treating alcoholism with kindness, as Lincoln advocated, he saw the temperance society handling it combatively. However, his final lines of hope carried many over into his message of mind over...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    Historians have argued Lincoln is the father of modern speech. Lincoln's versatility stretches from carefully constructed political critiques such as the Copper Union Speech, to the masterfully poetic Gettysburg...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    Abraham Lincoln was undeniably one of the most influential politicians in American history. In this collection of letters, speeches, and other writings by Lincoln, listeners can gain a uniquely intimate perspective on the sixteenth president of the United States. From personal letters to friends and family to Lincoln's speeches as an Illinois state legislator and a United States Representative, from his first inaugural address to the Emancipation Proclamation and the famous Gettysburg Address, Lincoln addresses such important political issues as slavery and states' rights and relates his personal views on marriage and depression. Also included are Lincoln's eulogy for Henry Clay, a letter...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    Prayers of Hope, Peace, and Protection offers an audio recording of prayers from the Bible, great Saints, sacred texts, and prophets who used these prayers for hundreds of years to invoke and strengthen their faith and relationship with God. Prayers include: Family Prayer, Praying for Hope and Comfort, Prayer for Trust in Jesus, Searching for God, Salutation to Life, Psalm 111, Prayer of Gratitude, The Door of Love, Prayer for Peace, The Irish Blessing, Prayer for the Coming Year. Authors include: Robert Louis Stevenson, George Dawson, St. Ignatius of Loyola, St. Anselm, Mozarabic Christians, Kalidasa, Ralph Waldo Emerson, William Temple, Abraham Lincoln. Read in English,...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    'The Perpetuation of Our Political Institutions' was a speech delivered by Abraham Lincoln in 1838. As it was delivered to the Young Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois, it is also known as the 'Lyceum address'. In this famous speech, Lincoln discussed the dangers of...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    A few of Lincoln's most famous speeches and the Lincoln-Douglas debate make for historic reading. (summary by David...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    This star-studded recording brings to life a history-changing political battle. The Lincoln-Douglas Debates made history and changed its course through seven legendary match-ups between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas during the 1858 Illinois senatorial race. Although he lost the election, Lincoln's gift for oratory and his antislavery stance made him a nationally known figure, and led to his election to the presidency in 1860. Never before presented in audio, these debates and great statesmen are brought to life by narrators Richard Dreyfuss (Douglas) and David Strathairn (Lincoln). The Lincoln-Douglas Debates provide a soundtrack to a nation discovering its better...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    Lincoln comes alive through the reading of his speeches,essays and other writings, including 'The Gettysburg Address' and 'The Second Inaugural Address'. Abraham Lincoln was born in a log cabin in Kentucky, second child of Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Hanks. Neither parent could read or write. His mother died in 1818 and his father remarried the following year and later moved the family to Illinois. Lincoln became our sixteenth president in 1861 and within a few months the Civil War began. He was shot by John Wilkes Booth in Ford's Theater in 1865 ten days after Lee's...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    On 27 February 1860, Abraham Lincoln gave this address at the Cooper Union in New York City. When he gave the speech, Lincoln was considered by many to be just a country lawyer. After he gave the speech, he soon became his party's nominee for president. (Summary by...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    During the Civil War, Union supporters in President Abraham Lincoln's hometown of Springfield, Illinois, asked him to speak at a rally on September 3, 1863. Lincoln could not attend but wrote this letter to be read at the gathering by his long-time friend, James C. Conkling. The letter was accompanied by a brief note which read, "I cannot leave here now. Herewith is a letter instead. You are one of the best public readers. I have but one suggestion. Read it very slowly. And now God bless you, and all good Union-men." Shortly after the rally, John Murray Forbes wrote to Lincoln, referring to the letter and the Emancipation Proclamation issued on January 1, 1863. Forbes declared that the...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    Abraham Lincoln saw many political changes during his time as president, few speeches regarding this were so impactful for their time than the last public address given by Abraham Lincoln in 1865. This address was given only two days after the surrender of Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army - an event that marked an effective end to the bloodshed of the Civil War. In the speech he calls to not forget what has just taken place and reinforces that the Union is the foundation of the United States. Finally, it calls for a unification of races after the abolishment of slavery, a notion which ultimately led to the untimely demise of the...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    A House divided was a speech that was given after his nomination to be a state senator by the Republican Party at the Illinois State Capital. In this speech, he clearly states something that he had always held to be true - that the United States could not let its political differences divided. What differentiated this speech from former speeches was in his ambiguity toward slavery. Rather than speaking out against it, Abraham Lincoln said that the entire nation must either oppose or abolish it for the good of the country's political...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    This is a SoundCraft Audiobooks production featuring digitally enhanced performances of some of history's greatest speeches - all presented as they might have originally been heard. The immersive audio experience presented here - complete with sound effects, music and atmospherics - allows the listener to feel as if they were in attendance when these speeches were first delivered. The orations are performed by a select group of amazing actors who uniquely capture the essence, power and complexity of these magnificent addresses, universally acknowledged as some of the greatest speeches in world history. Volume II features such disparate historical characters as Alexander the Great, the...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, with humility and gentle grit, guided his country through the most heart-wrenching experience in its national history - the Civil War. It is no wonder that he is considered by many historians to have been the greatest American president, as the man's character is told in his own words: "All my life I have tried to pluck a thistle and plant a flower wherever the flower would grow in thought and...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    On Thursday, November 19, 1863, Abraham Lincoln gave a brief address at the dedication of the Soldier's National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. This speech is now considered one of the greatest in American history and one of the finest examples of English public oratory. To mark its 150th anniversary, Librivox volunteers bring you 15 recordings of the Gettysburg Address. (from Wikipedia and LA...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    The Gettysburg Address & Emancipation Proclamation deals with two core events in the Civil War & American history. The 209 word Gettysburg Address captured the spirit of American life reaching back 4 score & 7 years ago, the Declaration, to the present. The Emancipation Proclamation freed the slaves & was another step in making all Americans free & equal. This audiobook reads both documents for listener knowledge. Most people have never heard either. Lincoln also reached back to images of the last Democracy, in 400 BC in ancient Greece with references to Pericles funeral oration in the Gettysburg Address. This, too, is read in this audiobook. Timelines, historical influences, and more...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    While the conflict over slavery was a factor in the Civil War, the abolition of slavery did not become a stated objective until President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, which went into effect on January 1, 1863. Freeing the slaves held in the still Confederate controlled states, it is heralded as one of America's most significant documents. Likewise, The Gettysburg Address, delivered by Lincoln on November 19, 1863 in the aftermath of a Union victory at the Battle of Gettysburg, is considered one of the greatest speeches in American...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) was one of the most influential presidents of the USA, uniting the country and abolishing slavery after a terrible civil war. On the 200th anniversary of his birth, his life and works are presented here in an easy introductory form. Through a balance of biography and the key speeches and letters, the man is brought to life, demonstrating his keen intelligence and determination, which was maintained all the way to his tragic death at the hand of an...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    While the conflict over slavery was a factor in the Civil War, the abolition of slavery did not become a stated objective until Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, which went into effect on January 1, 1863. Now, to commemorate the 150 year anniversary of the Proclamation, here is a new, unabridged audio recording of that historic document, freeing the slaves held in the still Confederate controlled states. Heralded as one of America's most significant documents, this is a piece of history not to be...read more

  • Abraham Lincoln

    After having written and released an initial draft of this proclamation in September of 1862, minor changes were made and Lincoln signed it on January 1st, 1863. It declared free the slaves in 10 states not then under Union control, with exemptions specified for areas already under Union control in two states. Lincoln spent the next 100 days preparing the army and the nation for emancipation, while Democrats rallied their voters in the 1862 off-year elections by warning of the threat freed slaves posed to northern whites. Once the abolition of slavery in the rebel states became a military objective, as Union armies advanced south, more slaves were liberated until all three million of them...read more