Searching for: "Aldous Huxley"

  • Aldous Huxley

    Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963) was an English writer and philosopher. He was best known for his novels "Brave New World" and "The Doors of Perception." Earlier in his career Huxley edited the Oxford Poetry magazine wrote travel articles, film stories, and scripts. He later became interested in spiritual subjects such as parapsychology and philosophical mysticism, including universalism. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in seven different years. This recording is from a speech in which he discusses "Brave New World" and George Orwell's "Animal...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    Aldous Huxley (July 26, 1894 - November 22, 1963) was an English writer and philosopher. He was best known for his novels "Brave New World" and "The Doors of Perception." This recording is from a speech he gave, "What a Piece of Work Man Is." Earlier in his career Huxley edited the Oxford Poetry magazine, wrote travel articles, film stories, and scripts. He later became interested in spiritual subjects such as parapsychology and philosophical mysticism, including universalism. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in seven different...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    Aldous Huxley (July 26, 1894 - November 22, 1963) was an English writer and philosopher. He was best known for his novels "Brave New World" and "The Doors of Perception." This recording is from a speech he gave, "What a Piece of Work Man Is." Earlier in his career Huxley edited the Oxford Poetry magazine, wrote travel articles, film stories, and scripts. He later became interested in spiritual subjects such as parapsychology and philosophical mysticism, including universalism. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in seven different...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    A gripping BBC Radio 4 full-cast dramatisation of Aldous Huxley’s classic dystopian novel It’s 2116, and Bernard Marx and Helmholtz Watson are token rebels in an irretrievably corrupted society where promiscuity is the norm, eugenics a respectable science, and morality turned upside down. There is no poverty, crime or sickness – but no creativity, art or culture either. Human beings are merely docile citizens: divided into castes, brainwashed and controlled by the state and dependent on the drug soma for superficial gratification. Into this sterile society comes an outsider, John – a man born into squalor and suffering, but raised on The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, a...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    From one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century, Aldous Huxley, comes his great novella, set in Rome, about a writer’s affair with a mysterious young fan—now back in print for the first time in the U.S. in more than seventy years and also featuring two other acclaimed short works, plus an original introduction from noted critic Gary Giddins. “The psychology of the two individuals is shrewdly mastered.... After the Fireworks displays on Huxley’s part a rare but genuine if elusive sympathy as well as a sound perception of human shortcomings.”—New York Times In After the Fireworks, three of Aldous Huxley’s lost classic pieces of short fiction are collected...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    The CBS Radio Workshop was an experimental series of productions, subtitled "radio's distinguished series to man's imagination" that ran between 27 January 1956 and 22 September 1957. The premiere production was Brave New World, narrated by Huxley himself, with a complicated sound-effects score that evidently took a long time to construct, and comprised a ticking metronome, tom-tom beats, bubbling water, an air hose, a cow's moo, an oscillator, and three kinds of wine glasses clicking together. There was also a cast of some ten actors. What was most evident about this two-part adaptation, now available on podcast, was the vocal contrasts: between Huxley the narrator, telling the story in...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    Though later known for his essays and novels, Aldous Huxley started his writing career as a poet. Published in 1918, The Defeat of Youth and Other Poems is his third compilation of poetry. The volume begins with "The Defeat of Youth", a sequence of twenty-two sonnets that explores irreconcilability of the ideal and the disappointing reality. Jerome Meckier called it "the century's most successful sonnet sequence, better than Auden's or Edna St. Vincent Millay's." In the rest of the volume, Huxley continues to explore themes started in The Burning Wheel, his first volume of poetry, including vision, blindness, and other contrasts. The volume concludes with two English translations by...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    Brave New World author Aldous Huxley on enlightenment and the 'ultimate reality.' In this anthology of twenty-six essays and other writings, Huxley discusses the nature of God, enlightenment, being, good and evil, religion, eternity, and the divine. Huxley consistently examined the spiritual basis of both the individual and human society, always seeking to reach an authentic and clearly defined experience of the...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    Mortal Coils is a collection of five pieces, which were written by Aldous Huxley in the 1920s. The first one, "The Giaconda Smile," is a short murder story. "Permutations among the Nightingales" is a play concerning amorous problems had by patrons of a certain establishment. "The Tillotson Banquet" tells of an old artist who was thought to be dead. "Green Tunnels" is about the boredom of a young girl on holiday with her family. "Nuns at Luncheon" is a story being told of a nun falling in love. The story mocks the writer's process, a concept Huxley used in his "Crome Yellow." Each story is read by the talented narrator, Simon...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    A satirical account of English society in the early 20th century, Crome Yellow is Aldous Huxley's first novel. Henry Wimbush is the owner of Crome, a stately manor house, and the host of a large party. His guests take advantage of his hospitality, pursuing their own romantic, political, and social agendas. Denis Stone, the hero of the tale, attempts to record the events of the party in poetry even as his own romantic plans go awry. A send-up of the traditional English country house novel, Crome Yellow contains thematic hints of Huxley's masterpiece to come, Brave New...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    'The Perennial Philosophy,' Aldous Huxley writes, 'may be found among the traditional lore of peoples in every region of the world, and in its fully developed forms it has a place in every one of the higher religions.' With great wit and stunning intellect-drawing on a diverse array of faiths, including Zen Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Christian mysticism, and Islam-Huxley examines the spiritual beliefs of various religious traditions and explains how they are united by a common human yearning to experience the divine. The Perennial Philosophy includes selections from Meister Eckhart, Rumi, and Lao Tzu, as well as the Bhagavad Gita, Tibetan Book of the Dead, Diamond Sutra, and Upanishads,...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    Originally published in 1932, this outstanding work of literature is more crucial and relevant today than ever before. Cloning, feel-good drugs, antiaging programs, and total social control through politics, programming, and media-has Aldous Huxley accurately predicted our future? With a storyteller's genius, he weaves these ethical controversies in a compelling narrative that dawns in the year 632 AF (After Ford, the deity). When Lenina and Bernard visit a savage reservation, we experience how Utopia can destroy humanity. A powerful work of speculative fiction that has enthralled and terrified readers for generations, Brave New World is both a warning to be heeded and thought-provoking...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    Denis Stone, a self-conscious young poet, is invited to the English townhome of Crome, renowned for its gatherings of intellectuals. Hosted by Henry and Priscilla Wimbush, the house party has much to offer the naive Denis. The guests include the self-contained Anne, whom Denis adores; the handsome artist Gombauld, his rival for Anne's affections; and the cynical Mr. Scogan. All have their stories and ideas to unfold but, as Denis comes to realize, ideas cannot compensate for reality. This is the first novel penned by Aldous Huxley, which launched his storied writing career which included Brave New World, The Doors of Perception, and Mortal...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    One of the greatest prose writers and social commentators of the twentieth century, Aldous Huxley here introduces us to a delightfully cynical, comic, and severe group of artists and intellectuals engaged in the most freethinking and modern kind of talk imaginable. Poetry, occultism, ancestral history, and Italian primitive painting are just a few of the subjects competing for discussion among the amiable cast of eccentrics drawn together at Crome, an intensely English country manor. When the quirky group has gathered for the house party, Henry Wimbush, the owner and self-appointed historian of the estate, relates Crome's history; apocalypse is prophesied, and a young, sensitive poet...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    The critically acclaimed novelist and social critic Aldous Huxley describes his personal experimentation with the drug mescaline and explores the nature of visionary experience. The title of this classic comes from William Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell: “If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is, infinite. For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things through narrow chinks of his...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    Crome Yellow, published in 1921 was Aldous Huxley's first novel. In it he satirizes the fads and fashions of the time. It is the witty story of a house party at 'Crome' where there is a gathering of bright young things. We hear some of the history of the house from Henry Wimbush, its owner and self appointed historian; Apocylapse is prophesied, virginity is lost, and inspirational aphorisms are gained in a trance. Our hero, Denis, tries to capture it all in poetry and is disappointed in...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    Though Aldous Huxley is best known for his later novels and essays, he started his writing career as a poet. The Burning Wheel is his first work, a collection of thirty poems that pay homage in style to poets who wrote in the Romantic or the French symbolist styles. Many of the poems deal with themes of light, darkness, sight, music, art, war, and idealism vs. realism. Though the optimism in his early works waned as he became older, his characteristically optimistic and determined point of view shines through. - Summary by Mary Kay The last poem was read collaboratively by ezwa, AlgyPug and Larry...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    In his final novel, which he considered his most important, Aldous Huxley transports us to the remote Pacific island of Pala, where an ideal society has flourished for 120 years. Inevitably, this island of bliss attracts the envy and enmity of the surrounding world. A conspiracy is underway to take over Pala, and events are set in motion when an agent of the conspirators, a newspaperman named Faranby, is shipwrecked there. What Faranby doesn't expect is how his time with the people of Pala will revolutionize all his values and-to his amazement-give him...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    In 1632 an entire convent in the small French village of Loudun was apparently possessed by the devil. After a sensational and celebrated trial, the convent's charismatic priest Urban Grandier-accused of spiritually and sexually seducing the nuns in his charge-was convicted of being in league with Satan. Then he was burned at the stake for witchcraft. A remarkable true story of religious and sexual obsession, The Devils of Loudon is considered by many to be Brave New World author Aldous Huxley's nonfiction...read more

  • Aldous Huxley

    Theodore Gumbril, a mild young Oxford tutor, has become thoroughly dismayed by the formality of college life and the staid British institutions of learning. An impetuous need for celebration, even rebellion, possesses him. He and his bohemian companions embark on wild and daring bacchanalian adventures that steer them resolutely away from stifling conventions of behavior, charging them for the first time with an exuberant vitality and lust for life. A sardonic and outspoken novel, Antic Hay unfolds its polemical theme against the backdrop of London’s postwar nihilistic bohemia. This is Huxley at his biting, brilliant best—a novel charged with excitement and loud with satiric...read more