Searching for: "Alexander Hamilton"

  • Alexander Hamilton

    Smith Show Media presents the classic Alexander Hamilton written by Alexander Hamilton and read by Walter...read more

  • James Madison

    The Federalist Papers are a collection of eighty-five articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay in favor of ratifying the United States Constitution. First appearing in 1787 as a series of letters to New York newspapers, this collective body of work is widely considered to be among the most important historical collections of all time. Although the authors of The Federalist Papers foremost intended to influence the vote in favor of ratifying the Constitution, in Federalist No. 1 Hamilton explicitly set their debate in broader political terms. “It has been frequently remarked,” he wrote, “that it seems to have been reserved to the people of this...read more

  • James Madison

    The U.S. Constitution was approved by the Constitutional Convention on September 17, 1787. It was to become law only if it was ratified by nine of the thirteen states. New York was a key state, but it contained strong forces opposing the Constitution. A series of eighty-five letters appeared in New York City newspapers between October 1787 and August 1788 urging support for the Constitution. These letters remain the first and most authoritative commentary on the American concept of federal government. Later known as The Federalist Papers, they were published under the pseudonym 'Publius,' although written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay. 'The Federalist Papers stand...read more

  • Alexander Hamilton

    Alexander Hamilton is considered one of the most important contributors to our constitution, and for good reason. In this speech, he addresses the handling of the constitution, and more importantly those compromises. While he acknowledges that compromises might need to be made for long-term stability's sake, he also underlies that America had been compliant up to that point. The end called to action the need for the government subsiding over the constitution to be fair and...read more

  • Alexander Hamilton

    The Federalist Papers is a series of 85 articles arguing in favor of ratification of the United States Constitution by the thirteen original colonies. When the Constitutional Convention met in 1787 to revise the Articles of Confederation, James Madison and Alexander Hamilton advocated instead for the creation of a new government. The delegates used the principles contained in Madison's Virginia Plan to create the Constitution, which was submitted to the states in September 1787. The Federalist papers were written in response to criticism of the Constitution. Federalist No. 66 is a continuation of the argument in Federalist No. 65 for the Senate as the trial venue for impeachments. In...read more

  • Alexander Hamilton

    The Federalist Papers is a series of 85 articles arguing in favor of ratification of the United States Constitution by the thirteen original colonies. Federalist No. 74 discusses the powers of the president as commander-in-chief and to grant pardons and reprieves. Hamilton asserts that the role of commander-in-chief is inherent in the office itself and requires the speed and resolve of a single decision-maker. He argues that vesting such powers among multiple executives could prove disastrous in the real world of military conflict. A similar argument is made regarding the power to pardon and issue reprieves, sensing correctly that group psychology might suppress the compassion to grant...read more

  • James Madison

    Originally published anonymously, The Federalist Papers first appeared in 1787 as a series of letters to New York newspapers exhorting voters to ratify the proposed Constitution of the United States. Still hotly debated and open to often controversial interpretations, the arguments first presented here by three of America's greatest patriots and political theorists were created during a critical moment in our nation's history, providing readers with a running ideological commentary on the crucial issues facing a democracy. Today, The Federalist Papers are as important and vital a rallying cry for freedom as...read more

  • James Madison

    The Federalist Papers (correctly known as The Federalist) are a series of 85 articles advocating the ratification of the United States Constitution. Seventy-seven of the essays were published serially in The Independent Journal and The New York Packet between October 1787 and August 1788 . A compilation of these and eight others, called The Federalist, was published in 1788 by J. and A....read more

  • Alexander Hamilton

    The Federalist Papers is a series of 85 articles arguing in favor of ratification of the United States Constitution by the thirteen original colonies. The Federalist papers were written in response to criticism of the Constitution. The articles were first published between October 1787 and August 1788 in newspapers and then published in book form in 1788. Federalist No. 65 discusses the reasoning behind the choice of the Senate to conduct Impeachment trials. He is sanguine about the danger of political factions polarizing the proceedings. He rejects the Supreme Court as too small a body to represent the general public and posits that assigning the House, the representative elected by the...read more