Searching for: "Alfred Lord Tennyson"

  • Alfred Lord Tennyson

    Alfred Tennyson was born on August 6th, 1809, in Somersby, Lincolnshire, the fourth of twelve children. Most of Tennyson's early education was under the direction of his father, although he did spend four unhappy years at a nearby grammar school. He left home in 1827 to join his elder brothers at Trinity College, Cambridge, more to escape his father than a desire for serious academic work. At Trinity he was living for the first time among young men of his own age who knew little of his problems. He was delighted to make new friends; he was handsome, intelligent, humorous, a gifted impersonator and soon at the center of those interested in poetry and conversation. That same year, he and his...read more

  • Alfred Lord Tennyson

    Alfred Lord Tennyson is one of the greatest poets of English Literature. Ulysses is one of his great works. The legendary Greek hero, Odysseus was the king of Ithaca. He was known to Romans as Ulysses. He fought a victorious war against the city of Troy with the Greeks. He fought many battles as a young man and spent ten years battling in the siege of Troy. Tennyson’s dramatic monologue “Ulysses” tells what the aging hero thinks after he returns home after that victory over Troy. The poem tells us about the search for adventure in human beings that makes their lives worth living. Tennyson projects an adventurer who is not ready to settle even at his old age and always yearns...read more

  • Alfred Lord Tennyson

    Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson, was born on the 6th of August 1809 and was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria's reign and remains today a poet of world wide fame. Much of his work is instantly recognisable and within a few words he distils perhaps the very essence of being English with such phrases as ", "'Tis better to have loved and lost / Than never to have loved at all" and "Theirs not to reason why, / Theirs but to do and die". His poems vividly capture and enthral and amongst their number are "Break, Break, Break", "The Charge of the Light Brigade", "Tears, Idle Tears" and "Crossing the Bar". He died, mourned by an entire Nation on the 6th of...read more

  • Leo Tolstoy

    Along with historical narrative, hear rare recordings of some of the most people in history, including Alfred Lord Tennyson, William Edward Gladstone, Guiglielmo Marconi, William McKinley, Leo Tolstoy, William Booth, Pope Leo Xlll, Sir Robert Baden-Powell, Dr. Frederick Cook, and William E. Peary. Recording obtained and published by Rick...read more

  • William Wordsworth

    The office of Poet Laureate goes back many centuries – informally to the time of Geoffrey Chaucer in 1389 and followed thereafter by a number of ‘volunteer laureates’. It was formally assigned to Ben Jonson in 1617 and, as a Royal office by letters patent in 1670, to John Dryden. It is a rich, rewarding history that bursts with the words, themes and visions of many great poets that has bound poetry and poets to a Nations soul.Victoria’s reign is mainly remembered as that which harnessed and amplified The Industrial Revolution with its myriad of inventions and the reinvention of society from agricultural to manufacturing. From there its thirst for markets and raw materials created a...read more

  • Edmund Spenser

    Poetry is often cited as our greatest use of words. The English language has well over a million of them and poets down the ages seem, at times, to make use of every single one. But often they use them in simple ways to describe anything and everything from landscapes to all aspects of the human condition. Poems can evoke within us an individual response that takes us by surprise; that opens our ears and eyes to very personal feelings.Forget the idea of classic poetry being somehow dull and boring and best kept to children’s textbooks. It still has life, vibrancy and relevance to our lives today. Where to start? How to do that? Poetry can be difficult. We’ve put together some very...read more

  • Alfred Lord Tennyson

    This poet of Victorian times was held in awe for his magnificent works, including "In Memoriam", "Morte D'Arthur", and "Charge of the Light Brigade". His language and command of vocabulary seem particularly in keeping with the grand sweep of Victorian ambition. Many selections are asembled here and read with great character by Dame Sybil Thorndike, Sir Edward Casson, and Robert...read more

  • Alfred Lord Tennyson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 10 recordings of To...As when with downcast eyes by Alfred Lord Tennyson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for August 15th,...read more

  • John Keats

    The Sea - An Element In Verse. Who does not remember the immortal lines from childhood - 'Break Break Break On Thy Cold Grey Stones'. The seas and oceans have a mystical power over us; from a playful day at the beach to the hysterical waves of the storm, this always changing element evokes both beauty and fear. Its great mass, its shimmering beauty, its raging howl and all in colours from blue to grey to green and crystal clear. In these collections of verse our poets - including Tennyson, Swinburne, Keats and Shelley and many others explore the relationship between ourselves and the great mystical waters. Among our readers are Gideon Wagner and Ghizela...read more

  • John Keats

    The Sea - An Element In Verse. Who does not remember the immortal lines from childhood - 'Break Break Break On Thy Cold Grey Stones'. The seas and oceans have a mystical power over us; from a playful day at the beach to the hysterical waves of the storm, this always changing element evokes both beauty and fear. Its great mass, its shimmering beauty, its raging howl and all in colours from blue to grey to green and crystal clear. In these collections of verse our poets - including Tennyson, Swinburne, Keats and Shelley and many others explore the relationship between ourselves and the great mystical waters. Among our readers are Gideon Wagner and Ghizela...read more

  • D.H. Lawrence

    Over the far horizon the blanket of night begins to slowly dissolve. The sun is once more on its daily journey across the heavens. The light begins to sharpen and increase in intensity revealing the landscape. Morning has begun and dazed heads and sleepy faces come to terms with the new day.Our poets capture the mood, the emotions and all manner of other details in their descriptions of this time. But then with the calibre of wordsmiths such as Tennyson, Wordsworth, Milton, Southey, Donne and many more besides we are almost spoilt. This volume comes to you from Portable Poetry, a specialized imprint from Deadtree Publishing. Our range is large and growing and covers single poets,...read more

  • Alfred Lord Tennyson

    Wanting nothing to do with men, a beautiful young woman founds a women's university, where no man can enter. But as the master Tennyson writes, 'Life is brief but love is long'; love will find a way; and the prince to whom the young woman was betrothed in infancy disguises himself into a woman and enters the grounds...This classic narrative poem continues to captivate generation after generation of listeners and it is no wonder why: 'Better not be at all than not be...read more

  • Alfred Lord Tennyson

    Idylls of the King is a series of twelve narrative poems which recite the legend of King Arthur, his knights, his love for Guinevere and her tragic betrayal of him, and the rise and fall of Arthur's kingdom. The whole work recounts Arthur's attempt and failure to lift up mankind and create a perfect kingdom, from his coming to power to his death at the hands of the traitor Mordred. Individual poems detail the deeds of various knights, including Lancelot, Geraint, Galahad, and Balin and Balan, and also Merlin and the Lady of the Lake. There is little transition between Idylls, but the central figure of Arthur links all the stories. Tennyson's metaphors of nature are derived from observations...read more

  • Alfred Lord Tennyson

    Continuing a collaboration started years ago with a performance at Tanglewood of Schubert`s Die Schone Mullerin, Benjamin Luxon and Frederick Moyer now turn to the little-explored genre of music for piano and narrator. Enoch Arden first came to international attention with a recording by Claude Raines and Glenn Gould but has since drifted back to obscurity. This is a work that both Luxon and Moyer have loved for many years. The poem is immediately accessible to any audience and tells a heart-wrenching story of friendship, love, separation and sacrifice. Strauss masterful score creates a powerful soundtrack to the...read more

  • John Keats

    Here are some of the finest narrative poems in the English language, dating from an age of rich inspiration: the nineteenth century. All tell powerful stories of human passion and endeavour, often reflected in vivid evocations of the medieval world. Includes 'The Eve of St Agnes' Le Morte d'Arthur and 'Peter...read more

  • John Keats

    The Poetry Of Trees. Although there is no definitive definition we all know what they are. At their most magisterial they can reach hundreds of feet into the air and be thousands of years old. But for many the visual structure they bring to our landscape in all their various heights and colours; their contribution to the seasons - stark branches, vivid leaves at birth and death is how we relate to them. For the poets here in this collection trees are a source of inspiration and give us much to...read more

  • Lord Tennyson Alfred

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 13 recordings of The Higher Pantheism by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for September 18, 2011. Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson, FRS was Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom during much of Queen Victoria's reign and remains one of the most popular poets in the English language. ( Summary by Wikipedia...read more

  • Lord Tennyson Alfred

    Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson, FRS was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria's reign and remains one of the most popular British poets. "Tithonus" doesn't mean a whole lot without the knowledge that the speaker is a mythological character who was loved by a goddess and was granted immortality, but not immortal youth. Since the gods could not take back their gifts, he was doomed to slowly suffer the extremes of decay as he grew ever older and older. (Summary by Leonard...read more

  • Lord Tennyson Alfred

    The Princess is a serio-comic blank verse narrative poem, written by Alfred Tennyson, published in 1847. The poem tells the story of an heroic princess who forswears the world of men and founds a women's university where men are forbidden to enter. The prince to whom she was betrothed in infancy enters the university with two friends, disguised as women students. They are discovered and flee, but eventually they fight a battle for the princess's hand. (Summary by...read more

  • Lord Tennyson Alfred

    In Memoriam is Tennyson's elegiac tribute to his friend Arthur Henry Hallam, who died in 1833 at the age of 22. Tennyson wrote this long poem over 17 years as a chronicle of his mourning process. The poem became a favorite of Queen Victoria when she was grieving for her husband, and was one of the most popular and artistically influential poems of the Victorian period. (Summary by...read more