Searching for: "American Standard Version"

  • American Standard Version

    Described by William Barclay as the "Queen of the Epistles," the Epistle to the Ephesians is one of the books of the Bible in the New Testament. Paul is traditionally said to have written the letter while he was in prison in Rome (around 63 A.D.). This would be about the same time as the Epistle to the Colossians (which in many points it resembles) and the Epistle to...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Epistle to Philippians (or just Philippians) is a book included in the New Testament of the Bible. It is a letter from St. Paul to the church of...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Epistle to the Colossians is a book of the Bible New Testament. The book is a letter from Paul to the church in...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The First Epistle to the Thessalonians, also known as the First Letter to the Thessalonians, is a book from the New Testament of the Christian Bible. It was written by...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Second Epistle to the Thessalonians, also known as the Second Letter to the Thessalonians, is a book from the New Testament of the Christian Bible. It was written by...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The First Epistle to Timothy is one of the three Pastoral Epistles, written by Saint Paul and part of the New Testament of the Bible. It consists mainly of counsels to Timothy regarding the forms of worship and organization of the Church, and the responsibilities resting on its several members, including episcopi (translated as "bishops") and diaconi ("deacons"); and secondly of exhortation to faithfulness in maintaining the truth amid surrounding errors, presented as a prophecy of erring teachers to...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Second Epistle to Timothy is one of the three Pastoral Epistles, written by Paul, and is part of the canonical New Testament. It may have been written sometime in 67 A.D. during Paul's second Roman imprisonment. In his letter, the writer urges Timothy to not have a "spirit of timidity" and to "not be ashamed to testify about our Lord" (1:7-8). The writer also entreats Timothy to come to him before winter, and to bring Mark with him (cf. Philippians 2:22). He was anticipating that "the time of his departure was at hand" (4:6), and he exhorts his "son Timothy" to all diligence and steadfastness in the face of false teachings, with advice about combatting them with reference to the...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Epistle to Titus is a book of the canonic New Testament, one of the three so-called "pastoral epistles" (with 1 Timothy and 2 Timothy). It is a letter from Paul to the Apostle...read more

  • American Standard Version

    Paul, who is apparently in prison (probably in either Rome or Ephesus), writes to a fellow-Christian Philemon and two of his associates. Paul writes on behalf of Philemon's slave, Onesimus. Beyond that, it is not self-evident as to what has transpired. Onesimus is described as having been 'separated' from Philemon, once having been 'useless' to him (a pun on Onesimus' name, which means 'useful'), and having done him wrong....read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Epistle to the Hebrews (abbr. Heb for citations) is one of the books in the New Testament. Though traditionally credited to the Apostle Paul, the letter is anonymous and most modern scholars, both conservative and critical, believe its author was not Paul himself but some other member of his Pauline community. The letter has carried its traditional title since Tertullian described it as Barnabae titulus ad Hebraeos in De Pudicitia chapter 20 ("Barnabas's Letter to the Hebrews".) (Summary from...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Epistle of James is a book in the Christian New Testament. The author identifies himself as James (James 1:1), traditionally understood as James the Just, the brother of Jesus, first of the Seventy Disciples and first Bishop of Jerusalem. With no overriding theme, the text condemns various sins and calls on Christians to be patient while awaiting the imminent Second Coming. The epistle has caused controversy: Protestant reformer Martin Luther argued that it was not the work of an apostle. Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy and Mormonism claim it contradicts Luther's doctrine of justification through faith alone (Sola fide) derived from his translation of Romans 3:28. The Christian...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The First Epistle of Peter is a book of the New Testament. It has traditionally been held to have been written by Saint Peter the apostle during his time as bishop of Rome. The letter is addressed to various churches in Asia Minor suffering religious...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Second Epistle of Peter is a book of the New Testament of the Bible. According to the epistle itself, it was written by the apostle Peter, an eyewitness to Jesus' ministry. He criticizes "false teachers" who distort the authentic, apostolic tradition, and predicts judgement for them. He explains that God has delayed the Second Coming so that more people will have the chance to reject evil and find salvation. He calls on Christians to wait patiently for the parousia and to study...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The First Epistle of John is a book of the Bible New Testament, the fourth of the catholic or "general" epistles. It was written in Ephesus about 90-110 AD, apparently by the same author or authors who wrote the Gospel of John and the other two epistles of John. Not actually a letter, it is a sermon written to counter the heresy that Jesus did not come "in the flesh" but only as a spirit. It also defines how Christians are to discern true teachers: by their ethics, their proclamation of Jesus in the flesh, and by their love. (Summary from...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Second Epistle of John (normally just called 2nd John or 2 John) is a book of the Bible New Testament. It is the 63rd book of the Bible, and the shortest, weighing in at a mere 13 verses. (Summary from...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The New Testament Third Epistle of John (often referred to as 3 John) is the 64th book of the Bible. Written in the form of an epistle, it is the second-shortest book of the Christian Bible by number of verses, and the shortest in regard to number of words (according to the KJV)....read more

  • American Standard Version

    The epistle is titled as written by "Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and a brother of James" NIV. If taken literally this means that the author is a brother of Jesus, an attribution which is now increasingly considered as the most probable....read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Book of Revelation, also called Revelation to John or Apocalypse of John, (literally, apocalypse of John; Greek, ?????????? ???????, Apokalupsis I?annou) (IPA: [??p?k?l?ps]) is the last canonical book of the New Testament in the Bible. It is the only biblical book that is wholly composed of apocalyptic literature. The visions given in this book were future events for the understanding of the early church,...read more