Searching for: "American Standard Version"

  • American Standard Version

    Proverbs, a book of the Old Testament, is a collection of pithy Biblical sayings. It is wisdom literature by multiple authors, including Solomon. Throughout the book, Lady Wisdom and Lady Folly struggle to get the attention of the simple, leading them to glory or disgrace. (Summary by Sam...read more

  • American Standard Version

    "Genesis (Greek: "birth", "origin") is the first book of the Hebrew Bible, and the first of five books of the Pentateuch or Torah. It recounts the world from creation to the descent of the children of Israel into Egypt, and contains some of the best-known accounts of the Old Testament, including Adam and Eve, Cain and Abel, Noah's Ark, the Tower of Babel, and the biblical Patriarchs." (From Wikipedia, modified by Sam...read more

  • American Standard Version

    During the time of the Judges when there was a famine, an Israelite family from Bethlehem - Elimelech, his wife Naomi, and their sons Mahlon and Chilion - emigrate to the nearby country of Moab. Elimelech dies, and the sons marry two Moabite women: Mahlon marries Ruth and Chilion marries Orpah. Then Mahlon and Chilion also die. Naomi decides to return to Bethlehem. She tells her daughters-in-law to return to their own mothers, and remarry. Orpah reluctantly leaves; however, Ruth says, "Don't urge me to leave you or to turn back from you. Where you go I will go, and where you stay I will stay. Your people will be my people and your God my God. Where you die I will die, and there I will be...read more

  • American Standard Version

    "Psalms is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings. Psalms were written by various writers, including Israel's King David. The Book of Psalms is divided into five books: Book 1 -- Psa. 1-41; Book 2 -- Psa. 42-72; Book 3 -- Psa. 73-89; Book 4 -- Psa. 90-106; and Book 5 -- Psa. 107-150. The collection includes the following types of psalm, among others: Psalms for praise, guidance, consolation, recognition of God's creation, the need for repentance. Certain Psalms, such as Psa. 22 and Psa. 110 are accepted by Christians and certain Jews as messianic or containing messianic prophecies." (From Wikipedia, modified by Sam...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Book of Daniel (?????), originally written in Hebrew and Aramaic, is a book in both the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) and the Christian Old Testament. The book is set during the Babylonian Captivity, a period when Jews were deported and exiled to Babylon following the Siege of Jerusalem of 597 BC. The book revolves around the figure of Daniel, an Israelite who becomes an adviser to Nebuchadnezzar, the ruler of Babylon from 605 BC - 562 BC. The book has two distinct parts: a series of six narratives (chapters one to six) and four apocalyptic visions (chapters seven to twelve). The narratives take the form of court stories which focus on tests of religious fidelity involving Daniel and his...read more

  • American Standard Version

    "The Book of Obadiah is found in both the Hebrew Bible and the Old Testament of the Christian Bible, where it is the shortest book, only one chapter long. Its authorship is generally attributed to a person named Obadiah, which means "servant (or worshipper) of the Lord". Obadiah is classified as a "minor prophet" in the Christian Bible due to the brevity of the writing (only 21 verses) and the content (prophetic material). An Old Testament prophet was (professedly) not only a person who was given divine insight into future events, but a person whom the Lord used to declare his word. The first nine verses in the book foretell total destruction in the land of Edom at the hand of the Lord....read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Book of Revelation, also called Revelation to John or Apocalypse of John, (literally, apocalypse of John; Greek, ?????????? ???????, Apokalupsis I?annou) (IPA: [??p?k?l?ps]) is the last canonical book of the New Testament in the Bible. It is the only biblical book that is wholly composed of apocalyptic literature. The visions given in this book were future events for the understanding of the early church,...read more

  • American Standard Version

    A quite lively and poetic discussion ensues among these wise elders and their suppositions and conclusions are eventually contested by a youth who enters the discussion toward the end. God has the final word in this narrative and Job is left to abjectly acknowledge that his complaints and knowledge mean little in the face of that which is so far beyond his ability to...read more

  • American Standard Version

    Ecclesiastes (or The Preacher) is the twenty-first book of The Bible. The author of this book is unknown but is considered by many biblical scholars to be Solomon.The author describes how all endeavors in life are in vain and a grasping for the wind, since all comes to naught in the end when we return to the dust from whence we came. The generations to come will not remember us. In the end, The Preacher admonishes us that the only purpose for man is to eat, drink and perform his labors under the sun and to do it with happiness and devotion to God.This reading comes from the American Standard Version (ASV) of The Holy Bible. (Summary by Robert...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Gospel of Matthew (Greek: ???? ???????? or ???? ????????, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion; literally, "according to Matthew") is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. It narrates an account of the life and ministry of Jesus. It describes his genealogy, his miraculous birth and childhood, his baptism and temptation, his ministry of healing and preaching, and finally his crucifixion and resurrection. The resurrected Jesus commissions his Apostles to "go and make disciples of all nations." (Summary from...read more

  • American Standard Version

    Practically nothing is known about Habakkuk's personal history, except for what can be inferred from the text of his book, which consists of five oracles about the Chaldeans (Babylonians) and a song of praise to God. Since the Chaldean rise to power is dated c. 612 BC, it is assumed he was active about that time, making him an early contemporary of Jeremiah and Zephaniah. Jewish sources, however, do not group him with those two prophets, who are often placed together, so it is possible that he was slightly earlier than they. Because the final chapter of his book is a song, it is sometimes assumed in Jewish tradition that he was a member of the tribe of Levi, which served as musicians in...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Second Epistle to the Corinthians is a book in the New Testament, written by Paul the Apostle. In this book, sometimes called Paul's Stormy Weather Epistle, Paul is at his most personal in dealing with the brethren at Corinth. Paul encourages the Christians to examine themselves (2 Cor. 13:5) to test whether they are to be found in Christ as a father helps his children to mature to become the image of Christ...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Epistle to the Galatians is a book of the New Testament. It is a letter from Paul of Tarsus to a number of early Christian communities in the Roman province of Galatia in central Anatolia. It is principally concerned with the controversy surrounding Gentile Christians and the Mosaic Law within Early Christianity. Along with the Epistle to the Romans, it is the most theologically significant of the Pauline epistles, and has been particularly influential in Protestant thought. (Summary from...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Epistle of James is a book in the Christian New Testament. The author identifies himself as James (James 1:1), traditionally understood as James the Just, the brother of Jesus, first of the Seventy Disciples and first Bishop of Jerusalem. With no overriding theme, the text condemns various sins and calls on Christians to be patient while awaiting the imminent Second Coming. The epistle has caused controversy: Protestant reformer Martin Luther argued that it was not the work of an apostle. Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy and Mormonism claim it contradicts Luther's doctrine of justification through faith alone (Sola fide) derived from his translation of Romans 3:28. The Christian...read more

  • American Standard Version

    "The Book of Isaiah (Hebrew: ??? ??????) is a book of the Bible traditionally attributed to the Prophet Isaiah, who lived in the second half of the 8th century BC. In the first 39 chapters, Isaiah prophesies doom for a sinful Judah and for all the nations of the world that oppose God. The last 27 chapters prophesy the restoration of the nation of Israel. This section includes the Songs of the Suffering Servant, four separate passages that Christians believe prefigure the coming of Jesus Christ, and which are otherwise traditionally thought to refer to the nation of Israel. This second of the book's two major sections also includes prophecies of a new creation in God's glorious future...read more

  • American Standard Version

    "The Book of Amos is one of the books of the Nevi'im (Hebrew: "prophets") and of the Christian Old Testament. Amos is one of the minor prophets. Amos was the first biblical prophet whose words were recorded in a book, an older contemporary of Hoseah and Isaiah. He was active c 750 BC during the reign of Jeroboam II. He lived and prophesied in the southern kingdom of Judah. His major themes of social justice, God's omnipotence, and divine judgment became staples of prophecy." (Summary by...read more

  • American Standard Version

    The Acts of the Apostles is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. Acts tells the story of the Early Christian church, with particular emphasis on the ministry of the Twelve Apostles and of Paul of Tarsus. The early chapters, set in Jerusalem, discuss Jesus's Resurrection, his Ascension, the coming of the Holy Spirit on the Day of Pentecost, how God added disciples to the Christ's church, and the start of the Twelve Apostles' ministry. The later chapters discuss Paul's conVersion, his ministry, and finally his arrest and imprisonment and trip to...read more

  • American Standard Version

    Paul, who is apparently in prison (probably in either Rome or Ephesus), writes to a fellow-Christian Philemon and two of his associates. Paul writes on behalf of Philemon's slave, Onesimus. Beyond that, it is not self-evident as to what has transpired. Onesimus is described as having been 'separated' from Philemon, once having been 'useless' to him (a pun on Onesimus' name, which means 'useful'), and having done him wrong....read more

  • American Standard Version

    "Moses leads the Hebrews out of Egypt and through the wilderness to the Mountain of God: Mount Sinai. There Yahweh, through Moses, gives the Hebrews their laws and enters into a covenant with them, by which he will give them the land of Canaan in return for their faithfulness. The book ends with the construction of the Tabernacle." (Summary by...read more

  • American Standard Version

    "Deuteronomy (Greek: ?????????????, "second law") or Devarim (Hebrew: ??????????, literally "things" or "words") is the fifth book of the Hebrew Bible, and the fifth of five books of the Jewish Torah/Pentateuch. A large part of the book consists of five sermons delivered by Moses reviewing the previous forty years of wandering in the wilderness, and the future entering into the Promised Land. Its central element is a detailed law-code by which the Israelites are to live within the Promised Land. Theologically the book constitutes the renewing of the covenant between YHWH, the Jewish God, and the 'Children of Israel.'" (Summary by...read more