Searching for: "Andrew Lang"

  • Andrew Lang

    Andrew Lang's Fairy Books or Andrew Lang's ""Coloured"" Fairy Books constitute a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. Although Andrew Lang did not collect the stories himself from the oral tradition, the extent of his sources, who had collected them originally (with the notable exception of Madame d'Aulnoy), made them an immensely influential collection, especially as he used foreign-language sources, giving many of these tales their first appearance in English. As acknowledged in the prefaces, although Lang himself made most of the selections, his wife and other translators did a large portion of the translating and telling of the actual stories. "The irony of Lang's life and...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    Andrew Lang's Fairy Books or Andrew Lang's "Coloured" Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. Although Andrew Lang did not collect the stories himself from the oral tradition, the extent of his sources (who had collected them originally), made them an immensely influential collection, especially as he used foreign-language sources, giving many of these tales their first appearance in English. As acknowledged in the prefaces, although Lang himself made most of the selections, his wife and other translators did a large portion of the translating and telling of the actual stories. Many of them were illustrated by Henry J. Ford. Lancelot Speed also did some...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    Andrew Lang's Fairy Books or Andrew Lang's "Coloured" Fairy Books constitute a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. Although Andrew Lang did not collect the stories himself from the oral tradition, the extent of his sources, who had collected them originally (with the notable exception of Madame d'Aulnoy), made them an immensely influential collection, especially as he used foreign-language sources, giving many of these tales their first appearance in English. As acknowledged in the prefaces, although Lang himself made most of the selections, his wife and other translators did a large portion of the translating and telling of the actual stories. Many of the books were illustrated...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    "Andrew Lang's Fairy Books or Andrew Lang's "Coloured" Fairy Books are a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. Although Andrew Lang did not collect the stories himself from the oral tradition, the extent of his sources (who had collected them originally), made them an immensely influential collection, especially as he used foreign-language sources, giving many of these tales their first appearance in English. As acknowledged in the prefaces, although Lang himself made most of the selections, his wife and other translators did a large portion of the translating and telling of the actual stories." (summary from...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    It is almost impossible to envision what childhood would be like without the enchanting world of fairyland. Three-headed trolls, horses that carry their masters up mountains of glass, giants and dwarfs, monsters and magicians, fairies and ogres—these are the companions who will thrill young boys and girls of all lands and all times, as Andrew Lang’s phenomenally successful collections of stories have proved. From the day that they were first printed, the Lang fairy-tale books of many colors have entertained thousands of boys and girls, as they have also brought pleasure to the many parents who have read these unforgettable classics to their children. In addition to such familiar...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    Andrew Lang's Fairy Books or Andrew Lang's 'Coloured' Fairy Books constitute a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. Although Andrew Lang did not collect the stories himself from the oral tradition, the extent of his sources, who had collected them originally (with the notable exception of Madame d'Aulnoy), made them an immensely influential collection, especially as he used foreign-language sources, giving many of these tales their first appearance in...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    The Red Fairy Book is the second in a series of twelve books known as Andrew Lang's Fairy Books or Andrew Lang's "Coloured" Books. The series was immensely popular and proved of great influence in children's literature, increasing the popularity of fairy tales over tales of real life. (Summary adapted from...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 16 readings of Romance by Andrew Lang, probably best known as Edward Elgar's song My Love Dwelt in a Northern Land. Interestingly, Lang initially refused permission for his words to be used as lyrics, and Elgar's wife Alice wrote alternative words Afar, amidst the Sunny Isles for the song. However, Lang later relented and gave permission for his poem to be used. The poem was initially published in The Century Magazine, May 1882, and this is the version recorded here. Later collections of Lang's poetry omit the third verse. (Summary by Ruth...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    One day while a prince was riding through a meadow he came across an old woman trapped in a ditch. The prince rescued the old woman and assisted her out of the ditch, safely. In return, the old woman told the prince about the most beautiful woman in the world and where to find her. The prince decided to take her advice and journey to find this beautiful woman. After several years of traveling the prince finally finds the beautiful woman, but now it is up to him to save her from her kidnapper and return her home safely. Andrew Lang (1844- 1912) a Scottish novelist, critic, and poet is most known for his folk and fairy tale collections. The College of St. Andrew was later named after him...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    Andrew Lang (1844 - 1912) was a British poet, novelist, literary critic, and collector of folk and fairy tales. In this essay, he investigates the mystery of the man in the iron mask of Alexander Dumas' novel. Lang traces the progress of the romantic legend, as it blossomed after the death of the man whose mask was not of iron, but of black velvet. The legend struck root and flowered, from the moment when the poor valet, Martin ("Eustache Dauger"), was immured in the French fortress of Pignerol. After an exhausting and fascinating look at the evidence, Lang comes to the conclusion that, whatever masked captive died in the Bastille in 1703, the valet Dauger was the real source of most of the...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    The poet, novelist and literary critic Andrew Lang (1844–1912) wrote, edited, collected, or contributed to more than 150 works, of which the most notable are his Fairy Books, a series of 25 collections of stories for children published between 1889 and 1913. Lang created the enchanting world of fairyland inhabited by the snow-queen, the mermaid's son, giants, ogres, dwarfs, monsters and magicians. ‘The Blue Fairy Book’ (1889) is the first volume in the series and contains some of the most familiar tales from sources like The Arabian Nights, Grimm, Charles Perrault, Madame D'Aulnoy, Norwegian folklore and more. Tales featured in ‘The Blue Fairy book’ include Aladdin, Beauty and the...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    The Crimson Fairy Book contains thirty-six stories collected from around the world and edited by Andrew Lang. Many tales in this book are translated, or adapted, from those told by mothers and nurses in Hungary; others are familiar to Russian nurseries; the Servians are responsible for some; a rather peculiarly fanciful set of stories are adapted from the Roumanians; others are from the Baltic shores; others from sunny Sicily; a few are from Finland, and Iceland, and Japan, and Tunis, and Portugal. No doubt many children will like to look out these places on the map, and study their mountains, rivers, soil, products, and fiscal policies, in the geography books. The peoples who tell the...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    Master storyteller Andrew Lang draws on his classical learning to recount Homeric legends of the wars between the Greeks and the Trojans. Paris, the lovely Helen of Troy, Achilles, Hector, Ulysses, the Amazons, and the Wooden Horse all figure in this magical introduction to one of the greatest legends ever told. Also included in this book are the adventures of Theseus and his dramatic battle with the Minotaur, as well as Jason's quest for the Golden Fleece with the help of the princess Medea. This re-creation of the Greek myths is a great listen for the whole...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    The Dragon of the North is an Estonian fairy tale of a terrible dragon who devoured all in his path on his way from the north. One brave man sets out to find a way to conquer him and protect the people of his home. The man consults a magician, who tells him to seek the aid of birds. With the help of the birds, he discovers a witch-maiden who can help him, but whom he mistakenly crosses. The young man must then deal with the consequences of his actions. Andrew Lang (1844-1912) was a Scottish writer who collected fairy and folk tales from various cultures and put them together in twelve volumes of tales. He was noted for taking the tales from as many original sources as possible, keeping the...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    When three poor soldiers found themselves unable to live on their meager pay, they decided to try to desert the army. The three men are forced to hide, trapped because the army is not moving on from the camp. While stuck in a ditch, the men encounter a dragon who offers to take them into his service for seven years. They layer find out the dark side of the deal, when the dragon tells them they will only be released if they can solve a riddle. One of the soldiers stumbles across the grandmother of the dragon, who is perhaps the only chance they have at solving the riddle and gaining their freedom. Andrew Lang (1844-1912) was a Scottish writer who collected fairy and folk tales from various...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    The Prince of Air was raised to fear love and distrust women. This all changes the moment he sees Princess Rosalie, and he kidnaps her and hides her away, much to the dismay of her father. When the Invisible Prince comes to visit Rosalie's father, it seems he might be able to rescue Rosalie after all, thanks to a magical gift from a fairy that granted him invisibility. Andrew Lang (1844-1912) was a Scottish writer who collected fairy and folk tales from various cultures and put them together in twelve volumes of tales. He was noted for taking the tales from as many original sources as possible, keeping the fairy tales close to their intended...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    Fairies play a large role in the lives of Prince Saphir and Serpentine and their families. The fairies place magical mirrors in the rooms of both the young boy and the young girl, enchanted so that each youth gazes upon the other. Saphir discovers a little frog that leads him on a series of adventures that eventually lead to a happy ending once he has proved himself honest and worthy. Andrew Lang (1844-1912) was a Scottish writer who collected fairy and folk tales from various cultures and put them together in twelve volumes of tales. He was noted for taking the tales from as many original sources as possible, keeping the fairy tales close to their intended...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    When he undertakes the daunting task of saving his father's ailing fruit trees, the young Prince Iwanich becomes enamored by a dream lady, Militza, who he cannot speak of, for he is bound to secrecy. Praised as a hero for saving his father's trees, the prince flees in search of the woman and her palace. They become betrothed, but one day, Militza is called away on duty, and leaves the prince with one request: there is one room in the house forbidden to him. But burning with curiosity, the prince opens the door to the room and unleashes a hurricane of unfortunate events. He is instantly transported to a wood where he becomes a witch's servant, and his fair Militza comes under the control...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    There once was a young shepherd who one day discovers a wounded giant. Although at first frightened, he decides to care for the giant who shows his gratitude by giving the young boy a belt of invisibility and taking him underground to a giant's wedding celebration. The boy sneaks a loaf of bread away with him while he is leaving so that he might have something to eat the next day but much to his chagrin, he is unable to tear the bread when he tries. He then tries biting it and is shocked when pieces of gold fall from the loaf. He decides that he will give the princess a gift of gold from his magic loaf for her birthday. Unfortunately, things do not go as planned and the boy soon finds...read more

  • Andrew Lang

    There once was a princess lost in a forest, terribly distraught, who stumbled upon a talking iron stove in the middle of the forest. The stove told the princess he could direct her back to her father's kingdom if she promised one thing -- that she would return and marry him. She was scared, but agreed, and made her way back to her father. Her father did not want his only daughter to marry an iron stove, so they tried to trick the stove by sending first the miller's daughter, and then the swineherd's daughter. He was not tricked, so soon the king relented and sent his daughter. She got a glimpse at the beautiful prince who was trapped inside the stove and immediately decided that she would...read more