Searching for: "Anthony Trollope"

  • Anthony Trollope

    The Way We Live Now is a scathing satirical novel published in London in 1875 by Anthony Trollope, after a popular serialization. It was regarded by many of Trollope's contemporaries as his finest work. One of his longest novels (it contains a hundred chapters), The Way We Live Now is particularly rich in sub-plot. It was inspired by the financial scandals of the early 1870s, and lashes at the pervading dishonesty of the age, commercial, political, moral, and intellectual. It is one of the last memorable Victorian novels to have been published in monthly parts. (Summary from...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    The intrigues of peaceful Barchester are of tremendous importance to its inhabitants, and Anthony Trollope enjoys observing how differently they impinge on the separate worlds of men and women. Men have to make a place for themselves in society; for them ambition is necessary and justified. Women, on the other hand, have to make marriage their career, and it is up to them to make as good a match as possible. For Trollope, however, genuine love is of the utmost importance to everyone, and the only real basis for marriage. 1. A NEW REGIME. Old Bishop Grantly dies, and his son Dr Grantly is overlooked as his successor. Dr Proudie is appointed, and he duly arrives with his wife and his...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Born in London on 24th April 1815 Anthony Trollope is considered a giant of English literature. His early schooling was at Harrow and Sunbury. Here was often bullied due to the family’s reduced financial means. His bad tempered father seemed to be full of energy but unable to execute any idea into a regular income. In 1834 Trollope moved with his family to Bruges in Belgium to escape the debt collectors pursuing his father. With an offer of work for the General Post Office he returned to London later that same year. The next 7 years were, by his own account, unproductive and miserable. However, in 1841 a chance to move to Ireland for the GPO availed itself and he took it. ...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Born in London on 24th April 1815 Anthony Trollope is considered a giant of English literature. His early schooling was at Harrow and Sunbury. Here was often bullied due to the family’s reduced financial means. His bad tempered father seemed to be full of energy but unable to execute any idea into a regular income. In 1834 Trollope moved with his family to Bruges in Belgium to escape the debt collectors pursuing his father. With an offer of work for the General Post Office he returned to London later that same year. The next 7 years were, by his own account, unproductive and miserable. However, in 1841 a chance to move to Ireland for the GPO availed itself and he took it. ...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    In Framley Parsonage, the fourth novel of Trollope's Chronicles of Barsetshire, the author leaves the confines of Barchester and looks to the countryside, where he relates the moral difficulties of Mark Robarts, the young clergyman who has recently been appointed Vicar of Framley. Desperate to keep up socially with the local aristocracy, the country parson is persuaded to underwrite the debts of Sowerby, a well-respected peer. However, when the debts are called in, Robarts finds himself in a serious predicament. Written with acute insight, together with a great deal of warmth and humour towards his characters' attendant charms and foibles, Framley Parsonage is sure to...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    The fifth novel in the Chronicles of Barsetshire, The Small House at Allington, concerns the lives of the two Dale girls, Lily and Bell, who live at the Small House. While Bell is in love with the local doctor, James Crofts, Lily is pursued by two men: the worldly, rich and handsome Adolphus Crosbie and the poor but honest Johnny Eames. With each determined to gain her hand in marriage, who will she choose? Enshrined as a literary classic, The Small House takes the reader on a delightful visit to rural England, and presents an insightful, compassionate and amusing examination of human nature, along with Trollope's signature flashes of...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    A man of conscience, duty and tradition, an immature, impressionable girl of supreme virtue and perhaps the greatest cad in English Literature are the chief protagonists of this tale. Tragedy falls upon the House of Humblethwaite. Sir Harry Hotspur's son dies at 21 years of age. There is no other male heir save a second cousin, a scapegrace seemingly beyond redemption. Can Sir Harry's daughter, Emily, effect a miracle and hold property and title together by an affectionate and honourable marriage to such a fellow, or is the demise of the ancient Hotspur family and all it stands for inevitable? "A novel can hardly be made interesting or successful without love. It is necessary because the...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Doctor Thorne is the third of Trollope's Barsetshire novels, and unlike some of the others, has little to do with the politics and personalities of the Church of England, or politics on the national level (though there is lots of politicking in the mythical county of Barsetshire itself). The plot revolves around the illegitimate Mary Thorne, who has been lovingly raised by her uncle, a country doctor, and who, as she comes of age, finds herself wondering whether she is a lady (in the county sense of the term). Frank Gresham, son of the squire of Greshamsbury, is in love with her (much against the wishes of his noble de Courcy relatives at the Castle), but she dismisses his affection at...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Known for such masterpieces as The Way We Live Now and Barchester Towers, Anthony Trollope was one of the foremost English novelists of the Victorian era. The first of his beloved novels featuring the fictional county of Barsetshire, The Warden, introduces listeners to Septimus Harding, the warden and kindly caretaker at Hiram' s Hospital for elderly gentlemen. Though Hiram' s is a charitable hospital, its estate has lately begun to take in a substantial profit, making the townsfolk-- and Mr. Harding himself-- question the terms of the warden' s growing...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    "Anthony Trollope (1815-1882) was one of England's most successful and respected novelists. "Relics of General Chassé"" is a humorous tale of a corpulent and somewhat dandified clergyman who, while visiting the castle at Antwerp, inadvertently becomes separated from his breeches. What follows shakes him to the core. The breeches fall into the hands of a group of female English tourists who decide to take some sample of the cloth as a souvenir. Having snipped enough of the garment to make a bag, a needlecase, a pin cushion, a pair of slippers and some leggings there are only a few seams and buttons left. The clergyman is left in a highly embarrassing position, not least because his nearest...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Ayala's Angel (1878) is a novel by Anthony Trollope. The story focuses on two orphaned sisters, Ayala and Lucy Dormer, and their trials, first with their relatives, then of the heart. As in most Trollope novels, pages are given over to subplots related to the main plot. Excerpt from the book: 'It was now the beginning of February. As Tom and his uncle had walked from Somerset House the streets were dry and the weather fine; but, as Mr. Dosett had remarked, the wind was changing a little out of the east and threatened rain. When Tom left the house it was already falling. He had walked there with a top coat and umbrella, but he had forgotten both as he banged the door after him in his...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Castle Richmond (1860) is a novel by Anthony Trollope. It is set in southwestern Ireland at beginning of the Irish famine. Castle Richmond is situated on the banks of the Blackwater River in County Cork. The plot features the competition of two Protestant cousins of English origin, Owen and Herbert Fitzgerald, for the hand of Clara Desmond, the noble but impoverished daughter of the widowed Countess of Desmond, providing the novel's principal dramatic interest. Castle Richmond was the first of several novels by Trollope in which bigamy played an important role. The Irish famine and efforts by authorities to mitigate its effects are the subject of many scenes and the object of abundant...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    He Knew He Was Right is an 1869 novel written by Anthony Trollope which describes the failure of a marriage caused by the unreasonable jealousy of a husband worsened by the stubbornness of a willful wife. A wealthy young English gentleman, Louis Trevelyan, visits the fictional Mandarin Islands, and becomes infatuated with Emily Rowley, the eldest daughter of the governor, Sir Marmaduke Rowley. The Rowleys accompany Trevelyan to London, where he marries Emily. The marriage is initially a happy one and the couple have a baby boy. Then a seemingly minor matter undermines their marriage. Colonel Osborne, an old friend of Sir Marmaduke's, visits Emily much too frequently for her husband's taste....read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Originally published in 1878, Is He Popenjoy? is a delightful comic novel written late in the career of author Anthony Trollope. The plot revolves around the themes of property and inheritance, as the relatives of the Marquis of Brotherton question the legitimacy of a foreign-born heir to the family estate. Lord George Germain, as the younger brother of the marquis, can neither inherit the family title nor enjoy the income from the estate. He occupies the ancestral home, Manor Cross, only by grudging permission of his elder brother, who lives abroad. But he does find happiness in his marriage to Mary Lovelace, the sweet-natured young daughter of the Dean of Brotherton, who brings a...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    “And, above all things, never think that you're not good enough yourself. A man should never think that. My belief is that in life people will take you very much at your own reckoning.” Anthony Trollope’s The Small House at Allington is the 5th book in a series called The Chronicles of Barsetshire, but is the most well-known of the series due to it writing quality and timeline placement within the series, and because it was the favorite book of one a past British prime minister in the 1990s. The novel follows the Dales, a family who occupies a large estate. Christopher is the owner of the estate, and allows his widowed sister and her children to live on a small house on the...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Can You Forgive Her? is the first of the six Palliser novels. Here Trollope examines parliamentary election and marriage, politics and privacy. As he dissects the Victorian upper class, issues and people shed their pretenses under his patient, ironic probe. Alice Vavasor cannot decide whether to marry her ambitious but violent cousin George or the upright and gentlemanly John Grey—and so finds herself accepting and rejecting each of them in turn. She is increasingly confused about her own feelings and unable to forgive herself for such vacillation—a situation contrasted with that of her friend Lady Glencora, forced by “sagacious heads” to marry the rising...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    The first novel in Trollope's Chronicles of Barsetshire, The Warden is a compassionate portrait of the gentle, thoughtful warden and precentor of Barchester Cathedral, Mr Septimus Harding. Loved and appreciated by all with whom he works, Harding lives an ordered, regular life in his protected religious environment. Then one day, a young reformer feels he has uncovered a mismanagement of funds and Harding is held to blame. The accusation comes as a shock not only to Harding himself but also to the cathedral community. It then comes to wider notice when the cause is taken up by a national newspaper. Trollope's insight into character, his abundant imagination, and his sheer narrative skill are...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Orley Farm is Trollope at his best (as good as the Barsetshire series), which means some of the best characterizations in the English language. Trollope's people are real; the beleaguered Lady Mason, charged with forging a will; the aged lover Sir Peregrine Orme; Madeleine Stavely, deeply but practically in love; the shallow, fickle Sophia Furnival and others are 3-dimensional figures that live and breathe. His satire of the so-called "justice" system is the best kind of satire: he just describes the court proceedings as they really are. The result is as up-to-date as today's newspaper. (Introduction by Leonard...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Phineas Finn is the sequel to "Can you Forgive Her?" and the second novel in Trollope's Palliser series. The eponymous hero is a young Irishman who becomes a member of the English parliament. Trollope aspired to become an M.P. himself, and he ably describes the workings of the English political scene. There is also a love interest, as the somewhat inconstant Phineas courts three different women: his Irish sweetheart, Mary Flood Jones; Lady Laura Standish, the daughter of a prominent Whig politician; and a lovely heiress, Violet Effingham. (Summary by Karen...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    The Prime Minister is the fifth in Trollope's series of six Palliser novels. With Phineas' difficulties resolved, Trollope introduces new characters. A respectable young girl forsakes the man her family had always intended her to marry when she falls in love with a man of foreign extraction and an unknown family. He has a gentleman's education and manners, but his family background and financial means are mysterious. Is he really a gentleman? Meanwhile, Plantagenet Palliser becomes Prime Minister of a shaky coalition government, and Glencora and Madame Goessler are busy with the ensuing social obligations. (Summary by Karen...read more