Searching for: "Anthony Trollope"

  • Anthony Trollope

    'The Warden' is the first novel in 'The Chronicles of Barsetshire' series and was also Trollope’s first breakthrough novel. It is the story of a devoted priest, beloved by all who know him, and who is racked by fear that he is accepting money to which he is not entitled. His antagonist is his prospective son-in-law John Bol, whilst his (somewhat unwelcome) ally is the characterful Archdeacon of Barchester, Dr. Theophilus Grantly. Based on real events that rocked the mid-nineteenth century and the Church of England, Trollope uses these historical events as a background to explore love, relationships, and...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    'Doctor Thorne' is the third of Trollope's Barsetshire novels and unlike some of the others has little to do with politics and religion. The plot revolves around Mary Thorne, an illegitimate child who has been lovingly raised by her uncle, a country doctor, and who, as she comes of age, finds herself wondering whether she is a lady, or to which social class she truly belongs. Frank Gresham, son of the squire of Greshamsbury, is in love with her (much against the wishes of his noble de Courcy relatives at the Castle), but she dismisses his affection at first as mere puppy love, thereby setting the scene for a series of entanglements, both social, romantic, and financial. One critic has...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    His beloved wife having died in childbirth, Phineas Finn finds Irish society and his job as a poorhouse inspector dull and unsatisfying, particularly after the excitement of his former career as a member of Parliament. Back in England, the Whigs are determined to overturn the Tory majority in the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Since Finn had once been considered the most promising of the younger set, he is encouraged to run for office again. Bribery, romance, and murder are peppered throughout this Trollope novel. The fourth novel in the Palliser series, Phineas Redux stands alone as a compelling work of political intrigue, personal crisis, and romantic...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Mark Robarts, a young vicar, is newly arrived in the village of Framley. With ambitions to further his career, he seeks connections in the county's high society. He is soon preyed upon by a local member of parliament to guarantee a substantial loan, which Mark in a moment of weakness agrees to-despite knowing the man is a notorious debtor-and which brings him to the brink of ruin. He must face the awful reality this loss will bring his family. Meanwhile, Mark's sister, Lucy, is deeply in love with Lord Lufton, the son of the lofty Lady Lufton. Lord Lufton has proposed, but Lady Lufton is against the marriage, preferring that her son choose the coldly beautiful Griselda Grantly. The...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    TheSmall House at Allingtonintroduces Trollope's most beloved heroine, the charming Lily Dale, to the Barsetshire scene. Lily is the niece of Squire Dale, an embittered old bachelor living in the main house on his property at Allington. He has loaned an adjacent small house rent-free to his widowed sister-in-law and her daughters, Lily and Bell. But the relations between the two houses are strained, affecting the romantic entanglements of the girls. Lily has long been unsuccessfully wooed by John Eames, a junior clerk at the income tax office. The handsome and personable Adolphus Crosbie looks like an enticing alternative; but Adolphus has his eye on the rigid Lady Alexandrina de Courcy,...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    "He was too imperious, too masterful, too much inclined to think that all things should be made to go as he would have them." Thus Trollope describes his hero Harry Heathcote, a settler and sheep farmer in the untamed bush of Australia in 1871. However, Harry has made enemies. In seeking always to act in the honourable fashion he cannot bend and embrace the weaknesses of others. A group of ex-convicts and disgruntled ex-employees threaten to burn his land and ruin him. Harry fights to protect his family and all he has worked for, despite his fears and self doubt and the apparent recalcitrance of a neighbour, Medlicot, a 'Free Selector' from the home country. Will his problems be resolved?...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    This is the second in Trollope's 'Barsetshire' series of novels. The later novels in the series move away from Barchester itself but 'Barchester Towers' is very much a sequel to the first book 'The Warden', which is also available from Librivox. The old bishop dies, the archdeacon, Dr. Grantly fails to succeed him and a new bishop, Dr. Proudie is appointed. Dr. Grantly gains a worthy foe, not the new bishop but his wife, Mrs. Proudie, strict sabatarian and power behind the Episcopal throne together with the bishop's chaplain, Mr. Slope. John Bold is also dead and Eleanor, now a wealthy young widow sets clerical hearts fluttering. The new bishop must deal with the wardenship of Hiram's...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Both Trollope and some of his later critics have considered The Last Chronicle to be his greatest novel. Many of its characters are familiar from the earlier Barsetshire novels, including the Rev. Josiah Crawley, the impoverished curate of Hogglestock, whose alleged theft of £20, together with the efforts of many to clear up the mystery, lie here at the center. Central also is the trying courtship between Major Grantly and Grace Crawley, the clergyman's daughter, over the objections of the Major's parents, Archdeacon Grantly and his wife; and the adventures of Johnny Eames, a protagonist of the Small House at Allington. Finally, it is in The Last Chronicle that Bishop Proudie of...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    This little-known but engrossing Trollope novel, published in 1870, centers on a feisty small-town clergyman, his cantankerous neighbor, the miller, and the women in both their lives. A murder, a trial, a feud, a fallen woman, and a complicated romance are woven together in an exploration of the limits of our ability to truly do right when we involve ourselves in the lives of others, even with the best intentions. (Introduction by Angela...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Marion Fay (1882) offers a pair of romances, each involving a match between one titled personage and one commoner. The misalliances lead to the typical strains between parental desires and romantic wishes of the young. The novel's primary characters have such noble dispositions that Trollope was impelled to create several far more interesting minor characters who either threaten mayhem or provide amusing diversions. (summary by Arnold...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    "I consider the story as a whole to he good, though I am not aware that the public ever corroborated that verdict." - the author The Claverings is the best wrought of the novels designed for The Cornhill, and as surely conceived as any book he ever wrote." - Sadleir. "It is a novel of atmosphere, and the atmosphere is of that sort very dangerous for the English novelist, the atmosphere captured so supremely well by Thackeray the green-lighted, close-scented gambling rooms, the shabby adventures of half-deserted spas, the shelving beaches of foreign watering-places, concealed accents, stolen passports, impoverished counts and impertinent ladies' maids.... Trollope's most serious attempt to...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    This is the story of the Macdermots of Ballycloran the story is about the tragic demise of a landowning family. Larry Macdermot lives in a dilapidated mansion in Co. Leitrim, whose mortgage to Joe Flannelly he cannot keep up. Enmity between the Macdermot and Flannelly families is sharpened by son Thady's having declined to marry Joe Flannelly's daughter, Sally. Macdermot's daughter, Feemy, is herself seduced by the locally hated English police officer, Captain Myles Ussher. This was Trollope's first published novel, which he began in September 1843 and completed by June 1845. However, it was not published until 1847. (Summary by Michele...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Clara Amedroz is the virtuous, intelligent, and quick-witted heroine of this novel. Like all women of her time, she has few options other than to marry. She is lucky enough to have two eligible suitors, and chooses the more urbane and worldly of the two. Alas, however, she realizes fairly quickly that Captain Aylmer is not a nice person. Throughout much of the novel we find her trying hard not to recognize that Will Belton - the suitor she rejected, and who still loves and wants to marry her - is. As in all of Trollope's novels, the sub-plots are at least as engaging as the main story: here, we find Clara associated with, and ultimately for some time dependent on, Mr. and Mrs. Askerton,...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    The thirty-five year-old (hence utterly over-the-hill) Miss Margaret Mackenzie, having devoted her life to others, suddenly finds herself with no one to care for, and in possession of a moderate fortune. Having money, she is now much sought-after and no longer universally deemed too old to marry. Partly because she has spent her life taking care of the brother whose money she has now inherited, she has no experience of wealth or popularity. Miss Mackenzie is the definition of "other-oriented. (Indeed, Trollope originally considered naming the novel, and his heroine, "Griselda", presumably to invoke the folkloric character's qualities of stolid obedience and endless patience.) These...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    "A Mid-Victorian Christmas Tale"; tells of a night time encounter between relatives who had never before met, resulting in minor injuries, embarassment, and Trollope's usual 'nice' social interactions. (Summary by Arnold...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    When the liberal government falls and neither party is able to form a cabinet, Plantaganet Palliser is called upon to lead a coalition government. He is reluctant at first, and displays none of the charisma of his predecessors, but eventually he grows into the role. However, his confidence is short-lived as he becomes embroiled in a scandal involving the villainous Ferdinand Lopez - unintentionally brought about by Lady Glencora Palliser. Pronounced 'a beautiful book' by Leo Tolstoy, The Prime Minister is a superb portrait of marriage and politics, and the compromises necessary for success in both. It is the fifth novel in Trollope's Palliser series. **Contact Customer Service for...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Bereft of his beloved wife Glencora and his role as Prime Minister, Plantagenet Palliser enters the realm of family politics as he struggles to guide and connect with his three wayward children. Lord Silverbridge, the Duke's first born and natural inheritor, expelled from Oxford, a gambler at the racetrack and an elected Conservative, further troubles his father when he becomes engaged to Isabel Boncassen, a vibrant and witty American heiress of low social status. Lady Mary, his daughter, falls in love with a penniless young gentleman named Frank Treager, while his second son, Gerald, displays similar behaviour to his brother. The beleaguered Duke must set aside his pride and accept their...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Mr and Mrs Brown are keen to make it to Thompson Hall for a cosy family Christmas - the first they will be spending in England instead of France for several years. When Mr Brown is taken ill in Paris en route home, it seems their Christmas wishes may not be coming true. 'Christmas at Thompson Hall' is a festive short story full of humorous mishaps from the much-loved Victorian author, Anthony Trollope. - Anthony Trollope (1815 - 1882) was a Victorian writer and author of 47 novels. He also wrote an autobiography, short stories and plays, travel articles, reviews and lectures. A prolific writer, he made no secret of the fact that money was his motivation for writing - an admission which...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    'An Editor's Tales' describes a series of encounters between various magazine editors and those who wish to have their works published. While containing some amusing bits, the tales are relatively grim compared to most Trollope stories. In 'The Turkish Bath', an editor, upon visiting a Turkish bath, is accosted by an Irish stranger, who, after some conversation, requests to submit a manuscript to the magazine. The editor's reactions to the solicitation and subsequent familiarity with the writer's circumstances forms the frame of the story. Humor arises about the Turkish bath situation and the reluctance of editors to make themselves available to amateur writers. 'Mary Gresley' is the...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Mrs Proudie, the warlike wife of the new Bishop of Barchester, brings the Reverend Slope into the Bishop's Palace to help dominate her husband and rule the local clergy. But Slope is a snake in the grass, determined to find a rich wife, to win advancement for himself, even to fight Mrs Proudie if necessary. Their battle becomes a furious dance, involving rich, pretty Widow Bold, angry Archdeacon Grantly, man-eating Signora Neroni, gentle Mr Harding, confused Parson Quiverful and his fourteen noisy children. This classic comic story is Trollope's most famous...read more