Searching for: "Anthony Trollope"

  • Anthony Trollope

    Clara Amedroz, toujours célibataire à 25 ans, est la seule fille du vieux châtelain de Belton Castle (Somersetshire). Ce dernier a dilapidé sa fortune pour assouvir les extravagances de son fils, qui vient de se suicider, de sorte que le domaine doit revenir à son cousin par alliance Will Belton. Aimable et généreux, quoique rustaud, celui-ci offre d'épouser Clara. Sensible à ses qualités, elle ne s'en croit pas moins éprise du très courtois mais fuyant capitaine Frederic Aylmer, membre du Parlement, auprès duquel Will fait pâle...read more

  • Joseph Conrad

    Water. H2O. Adams Ale. An essential for life. Without it life is impossible. Was it always that way? In this volume of stories water becomes the landscape and narrative, a character more deadly and perhaps more aware of its power than us mere mortals. We are beguiled by its sight. Whether softly breaking waves on a sandy beach or a thunderous storm engulfing the cliff face. But also in other forms; as lakes and lagoons. Water is everywhere and where there is water is the shadow of...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    The Way We Live Now is a scathing satirical novel published in London in 1875 by Anthony Trollope, after a popular serialization. It was regarded by many of Trollope's contemporaries as his finest work. One of his longest novels (it contains a hundred chapters), The Way We Live Now is particularly rich in sub-plot. It was inspired by the financial scandals of the early 1870s, and lashes at the pervading dishonesty of the age, commercial, political, moral, and intellectual. It is one of the last memorable Victorian novels to have been published in monthly parts. (Summary from...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    The Warden is the first of the six classic Chronicles of Barsetshire novels, Trollope's best-loved and most famous work. Anthony Trollope's classic novel centers on Mr. Harding, a clergyman of great personal integrity, whose charitable income far exceeds the purpose for which it was intended. On discovering this, young John Bold turns his reforming zeal toward exposing what he regards as an abuse of privilege, despite the fact that he is in love with Mr. Harding's daughter, Eleanor. Though the bishop and archdeacon stand behind him, the honest Reverend Harding is caught in a moral dilemma, questioning whether he truly deserves the money or should resign. Set in the world of the Victorian...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    The first novel in Trollope's Chronicles of Barsetshire, The Warden is a compassionate portrait of the gentle, thoughtful warden and precentor of Barchester Cathedral, Mr Septimus Harding. Loved and appreciated by all with whom he works, Harding lives an ordered, regular life in his protected religious environment. Then one day, a young reformer feels he has uncovered a mismanagement of funds and Harding is held to blame. The accusation comes as a shock not only to Harding himself but also to the cathedral community. It then comes to wider notice when the cause is taken up by a national newspaper. Trollope's insight into character, his abundant imagination, and his sheer narrative skill are...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Amongst the great popular novelists of the nineteenth century who are still read today, Anthony Trollope stands alongside his contemporary, Charles Dickens. His two series of novels, the political (The Pallisers) and the clerical (The Barsetshire Chronicles) are the best known. This book is the first of the Barsetshire series and was also Trollope's first really successful novel. In the mid nineteenth century there were a number of financial scandals in the Church of England including those of Rochester, where the endowments which should have supported the King's School Canterbury had been diverted to the Dean and Chapter; and of the hospital of St Cross at Winchester where the Rev....read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Known for such masterpieces as The Way We Live Now and Barchester Towers, Anthony Trollope was one of the foremost English novelists of the Victorian era. The first of his beloved novels featuring the fictional county of Barsetshire, The Warden, introduces listeners to Septimus Harding, the warden and kindly caretaker at Hiram' s Hospital for elderly gentlemen. Though Hiram' s is a charitable hospital, its estate has lately begun to take in a substantial profit, making the townsfolk-- and Mr. Harding himself-- question the terms of the warden' s growing...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    'The Warden' is the first novel in 'The Chronicles of Barsetshire' series and was also Trollope’s first breakthrough novel. It is the story of a devoted priest, beloved by all who know him, and who is racked by fear that he is accepting money to which he is not entitled. His antagonist is his prospective son-in-law John Bol, whilst his (somewhat unwelcome) ally is the characterful Archdeacon of Barchester, Dr. Theophilus Grantly. Based on real events that rocked the mid-nineteenth century and the Church of England, Trollope uses these historical events as a background to explore love, relationships, and...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    This little-known but engrossing Trollope novel, published in 1870, centers on a feisty small-town clergyman, his cantankerous neighbor, the miller, and the women in both their lives. A murder, a trial, a feud, a fallen woman, and a complicated romance are woven together in an exploration of the limits of our ability to truly do right when we involve ourselves in the lives of others, even with the best intentions. (Introduction by Angela...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    In the small English Town of Plumplington the daughter of a brewer and that of a banker each has selected her future husband contrary to the wishes of her father. Both young men are regarded as not 'good enough', though each is, in fact, much like the respective father when at that age. The girls, with the support of various townspeople, endeavor to get their way. One refuses to wear the nice clothes her father so much admires her in, while the other takes to her bed and refuses to eat. The fathers, of course, give in, and ultimately agree to the happy ending. (Arnold...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    The third and least political novel of the Palliser series, The Eustace Diamonds concerns the beautiful pathological liar Lizzie Greystock. Determined to marry into wealth, Lizzie snares the ailing Sir Florian Eustace and quickly becomes a widow. Despite the brevity of their marriage, Lizzie still inherits according to the generous terms of Sir Florian’s will, which include the Eustace diamonds. When the Eustace family solicitor, Mr. Camperdown, begins to question her legal claim to the family heirloom, Lizzie begins to weave a tangled web of deception and crime to gain possession of the diamonds. Enlisting the aid of her cousin Frank Greystock, much to the dismay of his...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    TheSmall House at Allingtonintroduces Trollope's most beloved heroine, the charming Lily Dale, to the Barsetshire scene. Lily is the niece of Squire Dale, an embittered old bachelor living in the main house on his property at Allington. He has loaned an adjacent small house rent-free to his widowed sister-in-law and her daughters, Lily and Bell. But the relations between the two houses are strained, affecting the romantic entanglements of the girls. Lily has long been unsuccessfully wooed by John Eames, a junior clerk at the income tax office. The handsome and personable Adolphus Crosbie looks like an enticing alternative; but Adolphus has his eye on the rigid Lady Alexandrina de Courcy,...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    The fifth novel in the Chronicles of Barsetshire, The Small House at Allington, concerns the lives of the two Dale girls, Lily and Bell, who live at the Small House. While Bell is in love with the local doctor, James Crofts, Lily is pursued by two men: the worldly, rich and handsome Adolphus Crosbie and the poor but honest Johnny Eames. With each determined to gain her hand in marriage, who will she choose? Enshrined as a literary classic, The Small House takes the reader on a delightful visit to rural England, and presents an insightful, compassionate and amusing examination of human nature, along with Trollope's signature flashes of...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

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  • Anthony Trollope

    Sir Harry Hotspur of Humblethwaite (1871) is a novel by Anthony Trollope. In this work Trollope offers psychological dissection of the issues of inheritance, filial duty, noblesse oblige, gentlemanly behavior, repentance and love, all hung upon the story of the wooing and losing of Sir Harry Hotspur's daughter (and heir to his property), Emily, by their 'scamp' of a cousin (and heir to Sir Harry's baronetcy), Captain George Hotspur. Artist Bio Author: Anthony Trollope (1815-1882) was an English novelist of the Victorian era. He wrote the novel series Chronicles of Barsetshire, and novels on political, social, and gender...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    A man of conscience, duty and tradition, an immature, impressionable girl of supreme virtue and perhaps the greatest cad in English Literature are the chief protagonists of this tale. Tragedy falls upon the House of Humblethwaite. Sir Harry Hotspur's son dies at 21 years of age. There is no other male heir save a second cousin, a scapegrace seemingly beyond redemption. Can Sir Harry's daughter, Emily, effect a miracle and hold property and title together by an affectionate and honourable marriage to such a fellow, or is the demise of the ancient Hotspur family and all it stands for inevitable? "A novel can hardly be made interesting or successful without love. It is necessary because the...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    "Anthony Trollope (1815-1882) was one of England's most successful and respected novelists. "Relics of General Chassé"" is a humorous tale of a corpulent and somewhat dandified clergyman who, while visiting the castle at Antwerp, inadvertently becomes separated from his breeches. What follows shakes him to the core. The breeches fall into the hands of a group of female English tourists who decide to take some sample of the cloth as a souvenir. Having snipped enough of the garment to make a bag, a needlecase, a pin cushion, a pair of slippers and some leggings there are only a few seams and buttons left. The clergyman is left in a highly embarrassing position, not least because his nearest...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    Unscrupulous financial speculator Ferdinand Lopez, aspiring to marry into respectability and wealth, has society at his feet: well-connected ladies vying with each other to exert influence on his behalf. Even Lady Glencora, the wife of Plantagenet Palliser, prime minister of England, supports the exotic imposter. Palliser, respectable man of power and inherited wealth, is appalled by the rise of this man who seemingly appeared out of nowhere. When Lopez achieves his socially advantageous marriage, Palliser must decide whether to stand by his wife’s support for Lopez in a by-election or leave him to face exposure as a fortune-hunting adventurer. This fifth installment in...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    The Prime Minister is the fifth in Trollope's series of six Palliser novels. With Phineas' difficulties resolved, Trollope introduces new characters. A respectable young girl forsakes the man her family had always intended her to marry when she falls in love with a man of foreign extraction and an unknown family. He has a gentleman's education and manners, but his family background and financial means are mysterious. Is he really a gentleman? Meanwhile, Plantagenet Palliser becomes Prime Minister of a shaky coalition government, and Glencora and Madame Goessler are busy with the ensuing social obligations. (Summary by Karen...read more

  • Anthony Trollope

    When the liberal government falls and neither party is able to form a cabinet, Plantaganet Palliser is called upon to lead a coalition government. He is reluctant at first, and displays none of the charisma of his predecessors, but eventually he grows into the role. However, his confidence is short-lived as he becomes embroiled in a scandal involving the villainous Ferdinand Lopez - unintentionally brought about by Lady Glencora Palliser. Pronounced 'a beautiful book' by Leo Tolstoy, The Prime Minister is a superb portrait of marriage and politics, and the compromises necessary for success in both. It is the fifth novel in Trollope's Palliser series. **Contact Customer Service for...read more