Searching for: "Arnold Bennett"

  • Arnold Bennett

    Neil Dudgeon and Tim McInnerny star in this epic tale of money, passion and defiance, inspired by the 'Five Towns' novels of Arnold Bennett In this radical reinterpretation of Arnold Bennett's classic novels set in the Staffordshire potteries, it's the 19th Century and the Industrial Revolution is at full throttle. Only the ruthless thrive in this uncompromising world - and Ephraim Tellwright and Darius Clayhanger are both determined to succeed. From humble beginnings, these two self-made men have risen to become wealthy and powerful. Now, they hold the fate of the Five Towns in their hands, passing judgement on those who put the prosperity and reputation of their community at...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    A BBC Radio 4 dramatisation of Arnold Bennett's tale of love, tyranny and rebellion, 'Anna of the Five Towns'. Brought up in the repressive tradition of Methodism by her miserly father, Anna Tellwright dreams of independence and freedom. On coming of age she learns that she is to inherit a fortune and realises that she is loved by the charismatic Henry Mynors. But with the money comes responsibility, and Anna's growing concern for William, the son of one of her tenants, leads her to a defiant act that threatens everything... Arnold Bennett's 'Anna of the Five Towns' was dramatised by Helen Edmundson, and stars Charlotte Riley as Anna, David Schofield as Tellwright, Emilia Harker as...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett - An Introduction. Arnold Bennett was born in 1867 in Hanley one of the six towns that formed the Potteries that later joined together to become Stoke On Trent; the area in which most of his works are located. For a short time he worked for his solicitor father before realising that to advance his life he would need to become his own man. Moving to London at 21 he obtained work as a solicitor's clerk and gradually moved into a career of Journalism. At the turn of the Century he turned full time to writing and shortly thereafter in 1903 he moved to Paris and in 1908 published to great acclaim The Old Wives Tale. With this his reputation was set. Clayhanger and The Old...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Learn to use your most precious commodity—time—to truly live. Arnold Bennett’s classic book, How to Live on 24 Hours a Day, has been changing the way people use and consider their time since it was first published in 1910. In the intervening century surprisingly little has changed—we still struggle to make use of our time and are often plagued by the persistent worry that we are not making the most of our lives. Bennett encourages listeners to stop merely following the rote patterns of their lives and leverage their free hours by viewing time as a commodity like money—each of us is allotted exactly 24 hours every day to spend as we see fit. What we make of our lives will...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    With the advent of the modern corporate workplace in the twentyfirst century, more and more people are toiling away behind desks, wearily clocking the standard fortyhour week. By 1910, writer Arnold Bennett had observed a worrying trend of exhausted wageearners whose waking hours revolved around their jobs and who had little time to spend on the business of actually living. Selfimprovement was Bennett's prescription for a speedy escape from the woes of the rat race. In his popular work How to Live on 24 Hours a Day, he advised those starved for time to set manageable goals for themselves and to pursue fulfilling activities-in much the same way that modern selfhelp experts urge today's busy...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Murder mystery by Arnold Bennett, adapted in two parts by Chris Harrald. Episode 1. American tycoon Theodore Racksole buys Europe's most exclusive hotel on a whim, but is warned by the seller that he will live to regret it. Soon, a mysterious death occurs and Theodore and his daughter Nella find themselves in danger in their own hotel. Episode 2: Having bought Europe's most exclusive hotel, American tycoon Theodore Racksole is thrown in to a world of intrigue, espionage and murder. Starring John Sessions with full...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    With the advent of the modern corporate workplace in the twentyfirst century, more and more people are toiling away behind desks, wearily clocking the standard fortyhour week. By 1910, writer Arnold Bennett had observed a worrying trend of exhausted wageearners whose waking hours revolved around their jobs and who had little time to spend on the business of actually living. Selfimprovement was Bennett’s prescription for a speedy escape from the woes of the rat race. In his popular work How to Live on 24 Hours a Day, he advised those starved for time to set manageable goals for themselves and to pursue fulfilling activities—in much the same way that modern selfhelp experts urge today’s...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    This is a selection of short stories recounting, with gentle satire and tolerant good humour, the small town provincial life at the end of the nineteenth century, based around the six towns in the county of Staffordshire, England, known as the Potteries. Arnold Bennett chose to fictionalize these towns by changing their names and omitting one (Fenton) as he apparently felt that “Five Towns” was more euphonious than “Six Towns”. The real town names which are thinly disguised in the novel are: Hanley, Longton, Burslem and Tunstal, the fifth, Stoke, became “Knype”. Arnold Bennett (1867-1931) was born in Hanley, the eldest child of a pawnbroker who subsequently became a solicitor....read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    With the advent of the modern corporate workplace in the twenty-first century, more and more people are toiling away behind desks, wearily clocking the standard forty-hour week. By 1910, writer Arnold Bennett had observed a worrying trend of exhausted wage earners whose waking hours revolved around their jobs and who had little time to spend on the business of actually living. Self-improvement was Bennett‘s prescription for a speedy escape from the woes of the rat race. In his popular work How to Live on 24 Hours a Day, he advised those starved for time to set manageable goals for themselves and to pursue fulfilling activities—in much the same way that modern self-help experts urge...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    "Which of us lives on twenty-four hours a day? And when I say 'lives,' I do not mean exists, nor 'muddles through.'" -- Arnold Bennett knew a "rat race" when he saw one. Every day, his fellow white-collar Londoners followed the same old routine. And they routinely decried the sameness in their lives.-- So Bennett set out to explain how to inject new enthusiasm into living. In this delightful little work, he taught his fellow sufferers how to set time apart for improving their lives. Yes, he assured them, it could be done. Yes, if you want to feel connected with the world, instead of endlessly pacing the treadmill (or, "exceeding your programme", as he called it), you must do so. For...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    In The Feast of St. Friend, a Christmas book, Arnold Bennett shares his views on Christmas as the season of goodwill. As always, Bennett's writing includes some thought-provoking ideas liberally spiced with his wry sense of humour, and as always too, you can barely believe it was written so long ago. This was published exactly 100 years ago, in 1911. (Introduction by Ruth...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett (1867-1931) was an English author, born in one of the "Five Towns" which form the background of so many of his witty stories. In The Burglary, Bennett tells the story of a highly respectable and distinguished citizen who hires a burglar to rob his...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The Old Wives' Tale is a novel by Arnold Bennett, first published in 1908. It deals with the lives of two very different sisters, Constance and Sophia Baines, following their stories from their youth, working in their mother's draper's shop, into old age. It is generally regarded as one of Bennett's finest works. It covers a period of about 70 years from roughly 1840 to 1905, and is set in Burslem and Paris. (Summary by...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    In The Feast of St. Friend, a Christmas book, Arnold Bennett shares his views on Christmas as the season of goodwill. As always, Bennett's writing includes some thought-provoking ideas liberally spiced with his wry sense of humour, and as always too, you can barely believe it was written so long ago. This was published exactly 100 years ago, in 1911. (Introduction by Ruth...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett was born in 1867 in Hanley one of the six towns that formed the Potteries that later joined together to become Stoke On Trent; the area in which most of his works are located. For a short time he worked for his solicitor father before realising that to advance his life he would need to become his own man. Moving to London at 21 he obtained work as a solicitor’s clerk and gradually moved into a career of Journalism.At the turn of the Century he turned full time to writing and shortly thereafter in 1903 he moved to Paris and in 1908 published to great acclaim The Old Wives Tale. With this his reputation was set. Clayhanger and The Old Wives Tale are perhaps his greatest and...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Published in 1917, this is a collection of a novella and seven short stories by one of the cleverest authors of the early twentieth century. ÔIn Queen's Quorum (1951), a survey of crime fiction, Ellery Queen listed Bennett's The Loot of Cities among the 100 most important works in the genre. This collection of stories recounts the adventures of a millionaire who commits crimes to achieve his idealistic ends. Although it was "one of his least known works," it was nevertheless "of unusual interest, both as an example of Arnold Bennett's early work and as an early example of dilettante...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett (1867-1931) was an English author, born in one of the "Five Towns" which form the background of so many of his witty stories. When Professor Malpetant pays an unannounced visit to his sister, Muriel, he finds nobody at home. Both Muriel and her maid, Annie, have gone out, though he finds the door unlocked and takes the opportunity to take a look around the house. In Muriel's bedroom he uses the telephone to call the station and arrange his onward journey to Bristol before setting off for the station. It is only when he is steaming on his way to Bristol that he realises he has left his umbrella in Muriel's bedroom. The unexplained presence of a man's umbrella in Muriel's...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The 'Card' in question is Edward Henry Machin - His mother called him 'Denry'. This light-hearted story is of his rise from humble beginnings as the son of a washerwoman and sempstress in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, in the pottery towns (which Arnold Bennett christened 'The Five Towns') of the English Midlands; how, by his own wits, enterprise and 'nerve' he rose to wealth, married bliss and public recognition as the youngest-ever mayor of his home town. "'And yet,' demanded Councillor Barlow, 'what's he done? What great cause is he identified with?' 'He's identified,' said the speaker, 'with the great cause of cheering us all up'." (summary by Andy...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett describes a method for enjoying literature, and suggests the contents of a comprehensive library. Chapters 1-10 and 14 describe his method for learning to enjoy literature. Chapters 11, 12, and 13 contain detailed lists of the 337 volumes required to complete a comprehensive library of English works. This reading is from the 1913 version at Project Gutenberg, and so does not contain the revisions made by Swinnerton for the 1939 edition, which included authors of the early Twentieth Century. Swinnerton's revisions are available from Wikipedia. (Summary by Timothy...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett (1867-1931) was an English author, born in one of the "Five Towns" which form the background of so many of his witty stories. When Alice joins her husband, whom due to the war she has barely seen since their marriage two years earlier, on his yacht for a belated honeymoon, she discovers that a boat is far from an ideal location to get to know one's spouse. For a start, there is no privacy anywhere. The crew can hear everything. Secondly, life about ship is run by men and operates on male terms. Alice sets out to establish herself as mistress of both her husband and his...read more