Searching for: "Arnold Bennett"

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett (1867-1931) was an English author, born in one of the "Five Towns" which form the background of so many of his witty stories. When Professor Malpetant pays an unannounced visit to his sister, Muriel, he finds nobody at home. Both Muriel and her maid, Annie, have gone out, though he finds the door unlocked and takes the opportunity to take a look around the house. In Muriel's bedroom he uses the telephone to call the station and arrange his onward journey to Bristol before setting off for the station. It is only when he is steaming on his way to Bristol that he realises he has left his umbrella in Muriel's bedroom. The unexplained presence of a man's umbrella in Muriel's...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The 'Card' in question is Edward Henry Machin - His mother called him 'Denry'. This light-hearted story is of his rise from humble beginnings as the son of a washerwoman and sempstress in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, in the pottery towns (which Arnold Bennett christened 'The Five Towns') of the English Midlands; how, by his own wits, enterprise and 'nerve' he rose to wealth, married bliss and public recognition as the youngest-ever mayor of his home town. "'And yet,' demanded Councillor Barlow, 'what's he done? What great cause is he identified with?' 'He's identified,' said the speaker, 'with the great cause of cheering us all up'." (summary by Andy...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett describes a method for enjoying literature, and suggests the contents of a comprehensive library. Chapters 1-10 and 14 describe his method for learning to enjoy literature. Chapters 11, 12, and 13 contain detailed lists of the 337 volumes required to complete a comprehensive library of English works. This reading is from the 1913 version at Project Gutenberg, and so does not contain the revisions made by Swinnerton for the 1939 edition, which included authors of the early Twentieth Century. Swinnerton's revisions are available from Wikipedia. (Summary by Timothy...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett (1867-1931) was an English author, born in one of the "Five Towns" which form the background of so many of his witty stories. When Alice joins her husband, whom due to the war she has barely seen since their marriage two years earlier, on his yacht for a belated honeymoon, she discovers that a boat is far from an ideal location to get to know one's spouse. For a start, there is no privacy anywhere. The crew can hear everything. Secondly, life about ship is run by men and operates on male terms. Alice sets out to establish herself as mistress of both her husband and his...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett (1867-1931) was an English author, born in one of the Five Towns which form the background of so many of his witty stories. 'The Fire of London' is an unusual mystery story about a case of fraud and blackmail. Bruce Bowring, a businessman of dubious integrity, has been running what amounts to a Ponzi scheme in the heart of the city of London. At the start of our story, Bowring receives a mysterious telephone call from a stranger, warning him that his house will be burgled that evening. Shortly afterwards, a telegram arrives, signed by his wife, suggesting they dine out, as their cook is drunk. As Bowring sets off for the rendezvous with his wife, he has no inkling of...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett (1867-1931) was an English author, born in one of the Five Towns which form the background of so many of his witty stories. 'A Bracelet at Bruges' is a mystery story about a lost diamond bracelet. Initially there does not appear to be any mystery about the loss. Kitty Sartorius, the famous actress, visiting Bruges with her friend Eve Fincastle, had just passed the valuable trinket to her new acquaintance Madame Lawrence to look at, when the latter accidentally dropped the jewellery into the canal. But despite the best efforts of the Bruges police department to drain the bottom of the canal over several days, the bracelet does not reappear. Cecil Thorold, a mutual...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett is famous for his stories about the Five Towns and the people who live there. They look and sound just like other people, and, like all of us, sometimes they do some very strange things. There's Sir Jee, who is a rich businessman. So why is he making a plan with a burglar? Then there is Toby Hall. Why does he decide to visit Number 11 Child Row, and who does he find there? And then there are the Hessian brothers and Annie Emery - and the little problem of twelve thousand...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The book, written by Arnold Bennett in 1910, is part of a larger work entitled How to Live. In this volume, he offers practical advice on how one might live (as opposed to just existing) within the confines of 24 hours a day. The book includes the following chapters: The Daily Miracle The Desire to Exceed One's Programme Precautions before Beginning The Cause of the Trouble Tennis and the Immortal Soul Remember Human Nature Controlling the Mind The Reflective Mood Interest in the Arts Nothing in Life is Humdrum Serious Reading Dangers to...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett offers practical advice on how one might live (as opposed to just existing) within the confines of 24 hours a day. 'Which of us lives on twenty-four hours a day? And when I say 'lives,' I do not mean exists, nor 'muddles through.' Which of us is free from that uneasy feeling that the 'great spending departments' of his daily life are not managed as they ought to be? [...] Which of us is not saying to himself - which of us has not been saying to himself all his life: 'I shall alter that when I have a little more time'? We never shall have any more time. We have, and we have always had, all the time there...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Buried Alive (1908) is a witty satire by Arnold Bennett about a shy painter. Excerpt from the book: 'The peculiar angle of the earth's axis to the plane of the ecliptic—that angle which is chiefly responsible for our geography and therefore for our history—had caused the phenomenon known in London as summer. The whizzing globe happened to have turned its most civilized face away from the sun, thus producing night in Selwood Terrace, South Kensington. No. 91 was one of about ten thousand similar houses between South Kensington Station and North End Road. With its grimy stucco front, its cellar kitchen, its hundred stairs and steps, its perfect inconvenience, and its conscience heavy...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    A Great Man: a Frolic (1904) is a humorous novel by Arnold Bennett about the beginning of the marriage of another author: Henry Shakspere Knight. Excerpt from the book: 'On an evening in 1866 Mr. Henry Knight, a draper's manager, aged forty, dark, clean-shaven, short, but not stout, sat in his sitting-room on the second-floor over the shop which he managed in Oxford Street, London. He was proud of that sitting-room, which represented the achievement of an ideal. The rich green wall-paper covered with peonies in full bloom matched the magenta table-cloth of the table at which Mr. Knight was writing. The fine elaborate effect thus produced was in no way impaired, but rather enhanced and...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The Card is a comic novel written by Arnold Bennett. Like many of Bennett's best works, it is set in the Potteries District of Staffordshire. It chronicles the rise of Edward Henry ('Denry') Machin from washerwoman's son to Mayor of Bursley (a fictitious town based on...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The Matador of the Five Towns and Other Stories consists of twenty-two short stories written by Arnold Bennett, their main setting being the pottery manufacturing towns of the English midlands. Contents: THE MATADOR OF THE FIVE TOWNS MIMI THE SUPREME ILLUSION THE LETTER AND THE LIE THE GLIMPSE JOCK-AT-A-VENTURE THE HEROISM OF THOMAS CHADWICK UNDER THE CLOCK THREE EPISODES IN THE LIFE OF MR COWLISHAW, DENTIST CATCHING THE TRAIN THE WIDOW OF THE BALCONY THE CAT AND CUPID THE FORTUNE-TELLER THE LONG-LOST UNCLE THE TIGHT HAND WHY THE CLOCK STOPPED HOT POTATOES HALF-A-SOVEREIGN THE BLUE SUIT THE TIGER AND THE BABY THE REVOLVER AN UNFAIR...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The Matador of the Five Towns and Other Stories is a collection written by English writer Arnold Bennett (1867-1931). It was first published in 1912. These satirical stories draw on author's experience of life in the Potteries, as did most of his best work. This collection includes 22 tales of life in the five pottery manufacturing towns of Staffordshire: Mimi, The Supreme Illusion, The Letter and the Lie, The Glimpse, Jock-at-a-Venture, The Heroism of Thomas Chadwick, Under the Clock, Three Episodes in the Life of Mr Cowlishaw Dentist, Catching the Train, The Widow of the Balcony, The Cat and Cupid, The Fortune Teller, The Long Lost Uncle, The Tight Hand, Why the Clock Stopped, Hot...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Hilda Lessways (1911) by Arnold Bennett is the second book of the Clayhanger trilogy, which paralleled Edwin Clayhanger's story from the point of view of his eventual wife, Hilda. It tells the story from her coming of age, her working experiences as a shorthand clerk and keeper of a lodging house in London and Brighton, her relationship with George Cannon that ends in her disastrous bigamous marriage and pregnancy, and finally her reconciliation with Edwin Clayhanger. In part a re-telling of the plot of Clayhanger, the book includes some scenes from the earlier book from Hilda's...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The Old Wives' Tale is a novel by Arnold Bennett. It deals with the lives of two sisters, Constance and Sophia Baines, follows their stories from adolescence, working in their mother's draper's shop, into old age. It is generally regarded as one of Bennett's finest...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennet's masterly novel is a gritty tale about a bookseller whose life and love of a woman are afflicted by miserliness. It is set in London's characterful Clerkenwell district shortly after the First World...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The Ghost: A Modern Fantasy (1911) is a novel by Arnold Bennett. Excerpt from the book: 'I see,' I observed, carrying my crushed remains out into the street. Impossible to conceal the fact that I had recently arrived from Edinburgh as raw as a ploughboy! If you had seen me standing irresolute on the pavement, tapping my stick of Irish bog oak idly against the curbstone, you would have seen a slim youth, rather nattily dressed (I think), with a shadow of brown on his upper lip, and a curl escaping from under his hat, and the hat just a little towards the back of his head, and a pretty good chin, and the pride of life in his ingenuous eye. Quite unaware that he was immature! Quite unaware...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Are you really 'living', or just existing? Do you want to improve yourself or just continue to muddle through? Do you use the time given you each day, or just throw most of it away? These questions Bennett asks each of us and for those who want to really live and learn, offers very valuable advice. Time is the most precious of commodities states Bennett in this book. Many books have been written on how to live on a certain amount of money each day. And he added that the old adage "time is money" understates the matter, as time can often produce money, but money cannot produce more time. Time is extremely limited, and Bennett urged others to make the best of the time remaining in their...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Are you really 'living', or just existing? Do you want to improve yourself or just continue to muddle through? Do you use the time given you each day, or just throw most of it away? These questions Bennett asks each of us and for those who want to really live and learn, offers very valuable advice. Time is the most precious of commodities states Bennett in this book. Many books have been written on how to live on a certain amount of money each day. And he added that the old adage "time is money" understates the matter, as time can often produce money, but money cannot produce more time. Time is extremely limited, and Bennett urged others to make the best of the time remaining in their...read more