Searching for: "Arnold Bennett"

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett (1867-1931) was an English author, born in one of the "Five Towns" which form the background of so many of his witty stories. When Alice joins her husband, whom due to the war she has barely seen since their marriage two years earlier, on his yacht for a belated honeymoon, she discovers that a boat is far from an ideal location to get to know one's spouse. For a start, there is no privacy anywhere. The crew can hear everything. Secondly, life about ship is run by men and operates on male terms. Alice sets out to establish herself as mistress of both her husband and his...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett (1867-1931) was an English author, born in one of the "Five Towns" which form the background of so many of his witty stories. When Professor Malpetant pays an unannounced visit to his sister, Muriel, he finds nobody at home. Both Muriel and her maid, Annie, have gone out, though he finds the door unlocked and takes the opportunity to take a look around the house. In Muriel's bedroom he uses the telephone to call the station and arrange his onward journey to Bristol before setting off for the station. It is only when he is steaming on his way to Bristol that he realises he has left his umbrella in Muriel's bedroom. The unexplained presence of a man's umbrella in Muriel's...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Hilda is saved from destitution by Edwin Clayhanger who marries her. The two, with Hilda's son by her disastrous 'marriage' to George Cannon, are living in Bursley. Edwin does not enjoy an entirely happy marriage with Hilda because of her outspokenness. Hilda has strong opinions on matters which at the time were considered to be a male preserve - for example, on Edwin's business. She also does things without telling him. As a consequence, Edwin has his doubts about their marriage and is angered by his wife just as he had been by his father. The book shows how Hilda and Edwin attempt to compromise, its title being a play on words: does it mean "these two" or "these separate"? It is suggested...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    These Twain (1916) is the third book in the Clayhanger trilogy, and chronicles the married life of Edwin and Hilda. Edwin, now released from the controlling influence of his father, finds himself free to run his business and his life, a freedom that is diminished by his wife's caprices. She does not conform to the period's stereotype of a submissive wife—which is, of course, partly why Edwin married her. Hilda, who is rescued from virtual destitution by Edwin through their marriage, and who already has a child, is not a figure of passive gratitude, and has opinions on matters—such as Edwin's business—which would normally be a wholly male preserve. Edwin has his doubts about their...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    This is a selection of short stories recounting, with gentle satire and tolerant good humour, the small town provincial life at the end of the nineteenth century, based around the six towns in the county of Staffordshire, England, known as the Potteries. Arnold Bennett chose to fictionalize these towns by changing their names and omitting one (Fenton) as he apparently felt that “Five Towns” was more euphonious than “Six Towns”. The real town names which are thinly disguised in the novel are: Hanley, Longton, Burslem and Tunstal, the fifth, Stoke, became “Knype”. Arnold Bennett (1867-1931) was born in Hanley, the eldest child of a pawnbroker who subsequently became a solicitor....read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett is famous for his stories about the Five Towns and the people who live there. They look and sound just like other people, and, like all of us, sometimes they do some very strange things. There's Sir Jee, who is a rich businessman. So why is he making a plan with a burglar? Then there is Toby Hall. Why does he decide to visit Number 11 Child Row, and who does he find there? And then there are the Hessian brothers and Annie Emery - and the little problem of twelve thousand...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Bennett's essays always provide food for thought and bring a wry smile to the lips. Human nature, it appears, changes little over the ages, and Bennett, as always, stands the test of time, though in the case of some of the essays in this eclectic collection, it is well to remember that they were written at the time of the First World War and the fight for women's suffrage. (Summary by Ruth...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    'Self and Self-management: Essays about Existing' looks at identity and characteristics in connection to parts of social behavior. The emphasis is on self and self-administration. The parts inspect the subtleties of outgoing people; war; social collaboration; the roles of men and women; human apparel, and related sex contrasts in differing...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Self and Self-Management: Essays about Existing is one of Bennett's most successful works, comprising a series of essays that address the struggles concerning work that mainly young women have faced during his time, at an individual level. The essays start at a basis that seems to suggest all individuals have a certain ability to use their energy wisely while working, and to either tap into their own resources, or use tactics of avoidance that can be extremely elaborate at a psychological level. According to Bennett, 'some individuals appear to lack energy, when, in fact, they are full of energy which is merely dormant.' The essays themselves tackle issues that we are faced with on a...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Bennett's essays always provide food for thought and bring a wry smile to the lips. Human nature, it appears, changes little over the ages, and Bennett, as always, stands the test of time, though in the case of some of the essays in this eclectic collection, it is well to remember that they were written at the time of the First World War and the fight for women's suffrage. (Summary by Ruth...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The Roll-Call (1918) by Arnold Bennett is a novel written after the Clayhanger trilogy. It describes the young life of Clayhanger's stepson, George. George Edwin Cannon—he soon drops the surname Clayhanger, given to him upon his mother's marriage—is an architect, and represents what his stepfather Edwin Clayhanger wished to become. The characters of Edwin and Hilda are not developed further in this book: Edwin—now elevated to Alderman—appears only briefly. The central character displays an unattractive arrogance because of the wealth behind him. In an early chapter, he thinks about adding electric light to his London dwelling, and decides that he—or rather, his stepfather—can...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    It is 1919 shortly after the termination of the 1st European holocaust. Henry Earlforward, a middle aged North London Bookseller, courts and marries Violet Arb, a widow who has inherited the confectioners shop opposite his own premises in Riceyman Square. Henry and Violet engage the services of Elsie as ‘charwoman’. The marriage outwardly appears to be successful, although Henry has also inherited and is not an esteemed native of the district and Violet likewise - having been a nomadic traveller due to the demands of her late husbands employment, and her entrenched belief in class differences. But Henry has a monstrous passion which transcends his love for Violet, his resolute...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennet's masterly novel is a gritty tale about a bookseller whose life and love of a woman are afflicted by miserliness. It is set in London's characterful Clerkenwell district shortly after the First World...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The Regent' is, if not a sequel to 'The Card', then a 'Further Adventures of' the eponymous hero of that novel. Denry Machin is now forty-three and begins to feel that he is getting old, that making money and a happy home life are not enough and that he has lost his touch as the entrepreneur and entertainer of the 'Five Towns'. In fact, as he says to himself 'What I want is change - and a lot of it too!'. A chance meeting at the local theatre leads to his going to London and then... (Summary by...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Denry Machin is now in his forties and begins to feel that he is getting old, that making money and a happy home life are not enough for him and that he has lost his touch as the entrepreneur and entertainer of the 'Five...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The Regent; or A towns story of adventure in London is a story about London's upper class society in the Victorian era. The protagonist Edward Henry is a self-made successful entrepreneur, a 'nouveau riche'. He is a charming and clever man, but unfortunately with no artistic taste. Despite his wealth and accomplished political influence, he becomes bored in the small town so he heads up to London in order to get back into the competitive and exciting 'game' of...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Rachel Louise Fleckring works for the elderly Mrs Maldon, and although with the woman for only a short time, she is taken into the heart of the family. She falls in love with one of Mrs Maldon's descendents, but along the way, she has to come to terms with the fact that he isn't, perhaps, the perfectly honest man she thought he was. (Summary by...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The Old Wives' Tale is a novel by Arnold Bennett, first published in 1908. It deals with the lives of two very different sisters, Constance and Sophia Baines, following their stories from their youth, working in their mother's draper's shop, into old age. It is generally regarded as one of Bennett's finest works. It covers a period of about 70 years from roughly 1840 to 1905, and is set in Burslem and Paris. (Summary by...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The Old Wives' Tale is a novel by Arnold Bennett. It deals with the lives of two sisters, Constance and Sophia Baines, follows their stories from adolescence, working in their mother's draper's shop, into old age. It is generally regarded as one of Bennett's finest...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The Old Wives' Tale is a novel by Arnold Bennett, first published in 1908. It deals with the lives of two very different sisters, Constance and Sophia Baines, following their stories from their youth, working in their mother's draper's shop, into old age. It is regarded as one of Bennett's finest works. The story covers a period of about 70 years from roughly 1840 to 1905, and is set in Burslem and Paris. The book is broken up into four parts, Mrs Baines, Constance, Sophia and What Life Is. The first section, 'Mrs Baines' details the adolescence of both Sophia and Constance, and their life in their father's shop and house. The father is ill and bedridden, and the main adult in their life is...read more