Searching for: "Arnold Bennett"

  • Arnold Bennett

    Are you really 'living', or just existing? Do you want to improve yourself or just continue to muddle through? Do you use the time given you each day, or just throw most of it away? These questions Bennett asks each of us and for those who want to really live and learn, offers very valuable advice. Time is the most precious of commodities states Bennett in this book. Many books have been written on how to live on a certain amount of money each day. And he added that the old adage "time is money" understates the matter, as time can often produce money, but money cannot produce more time. Time is extremely limited, and Bennett urged others to make the best of the time remaining in their...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    "Which of us lives on twenty-four hours a day? And when I say 'lives,' I do not mean exists, nor 'muddles through.'" -- Arnold Bennett knew a "rat race" when he saw one. Every day, his fellow white-collar Londoners followed the same old routine. And they routinely decried the sameness in their lives.-- So Bennett set out to explain how to inject new enthusiasm into living. In this delightful little work, he taught his fellow sufferers how to set time apart for improving their lives. Yes, he assured them, it could be done. Yes, if you want to feel connected with the world, instead of endlessly pacing the treadmill (or, "exceeding your programme", as he called it), you must do so. For...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The Old Wives' Tale is a novel by Arnold Bennett, first published in 1908. It deals with the lives of two very different sisters, Constance and Sophia Baines, following their stories from their youth, working in their mother's draper's shop, into old age. It is generally regarded as one of Bennett's finest works. It covers a period of about 70 years from roughly 1840 to 1905, and is set in Burslem and Paris. (Summary by...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Bennett asks us to consider our brains as the most wonderful machine, a machine which is the only thing in this world that we can control. As he writes: "I am simply bent on calling your attention to a fact which has perhaps wholly or partially escaped you -- namely, that you are the most fascinating bit of machinery that ever was." As ever, his prose is honeyed, his thoughts inspired, and his advice as relevant today as when it was...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Rachel Louise Fleckring works for the elderly Mrs Maldon, and although with the woman for only a short time, she is taken into the heart of the family. She falls in love with one of Mrs Maldon's descendents, but along the way, she has to come to terms with the fact that he isn't, perhaps, the perfectly honest man she thought he was. (Summary by...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Bennett's essays always provide food for thought and bring a wry smile to the lips. Human nature, it appears, changes little over the ages, and Bennett, as always, stands the test of time, though in the case of some of the essays in this eclectic collection, it is well to remember that they were written at the time of the First World War and the fight for women's suffrage. (Summary by Ruth...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    In The Feast of St. Friend, a Christmas book, Arnold Bennett shares his views on Christmas as the season of goodwill. As always, Bennett's writing includes some thought-provoking ideas liberally spiced with his wry sense of humour, and as always too, you can barely believe it was written so long ago. This was published exactly 100 years ago, in 1911. (Introduction by Ruth...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    With the advent of the modern corporate workplace in the twentyfirst century, more and more people are toiling away behind desks, wearily clocking the standard fortyhour week. By 1910, writer Arnold Bennett had observed a worrying trend of exhausted wageearners whose waking hours revolved around their jobs and who had little time to spend on the business of actually living. Selfimprovement was Bennett’s prescription for a speedy escape from the woes of the rat race. In his popular work How to Live on 24 Hours a Day, he advised those starved for time to set manageable goals for themselves and to pursue fulfilling activities—in much the same way that modern selfhelp experts urge today’s...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    With the advent of the modern corporate workplace in the twentyfirst century, more and more people are toiling away behind desks, wearily clocking the standard fortyhour week. By 1910, writer Arnold Bennett had observed a worrying trend of exhausted wageearners whose waking hours revolved around their jobs and who had little time to spend on the business of actually living. Selfimprovement was Bennett's prescription for a speedy escape from the woes of the rat race. In his popular work How to Live on 24 Hours a Day, he advised those starved for time to set manageable goals for themselves and to pursue fulfilling activities-in much the same way that modern selfhelp experts urge today's busy...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    It is 1919 shortly after the termination of the 1st European holocaust. Henry Earlforward, a middle aged North London Bookseller, courts and marries Violet Arb, a widow who has inherited the confectioners shop opposite his own premises in Riceyman Square. Henry and Violet engage the services of Elsie as ‘charwoman’. The marriage outwardly appears to be successful, although Henry has also inherited and is not an esteemed native of the district and Violet likewise - having been a nomadic traveller due to the demands of her late husbands employment, and her entrenched belief in class differences. But Henry has a monstrous passion which transcends his love for Violet, his resolute...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    When local musical prodigy, Gilbert Swann, is selected to play the violoncello with the visiting London orchestra during the musical festival in the five towns, his mother is convinced that he will be the cornerstone of the entire event. When local dignitary Mrs. Clayton-Vernon invites Gilbert to dinner before the concert with her cousin, the famous conductor from London, she sees this as recognition of his musical genius. A sudden cold snap on the day, however, makes Mrs. Swann fearful that Gilbert's hands will get cold on the journey from Mrs. Clayton-Vernon's house to the concert. She resolves to deploy a remedy from her childhood, and sets off to Mrs. Clayton-Vernon's mansion with...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    A young wife in a quiet Midlands town, a new dress, a dance, an unimaginative husband. How could a mandarin's sudden death in far-away China have any connection with this homely...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett (1867-1931) was an English author, born in one of the "Five Towns" which form the background of so many of his witty stories. In The Burglary, Bennett tells the story of a highly respectable and distinguished citizen who hires a burglar to rob his...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett (1867-1931) was an English author, born in one of the "Five Towns" which form the background of so many of his witty stories. When Professor Malpetant pays an unannounced visit to his sister, Muriel, he finds nobody at home. Both Muriel and her maid, Annie, have gone out, though he finds the door unlocked and takes the opportunity to take a look around the house. In Muriel's bedroom he uses the telephone to call the station and arrange his onward journey to Bristol before setting off for the station. It is only when he is steaming on his way to Bristol that he realises he has left his umbrella in Muriel's bedroom. The unexplained presence of a man's umbrella in Muriel's...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Bennett described his story as an 'Idyllic Diversion'.Helen Rathbone meets her elderly uncle, James Ollerenshaw, in Bursley Park, after an estrangement of several years. Both are very strong willed, independent characters. Helen has an extravagant lifestyle and likes to spend money while the old man has lived a thrifty life and intends to continue in the same way.However, they develop a friendship which progresses rapidly and Helen moves in to James' house to look after him. A battle of wills begins in earnest.Each uses all the cunning and emotional blackmail they can muster to get their own way and both experience a transformation as romance comes knocking at the door.A wonderfully...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The Regent' is, if not a sequel to 'The Card', then a 'Further Adventures of' the eponymous hero of that novel. Denry Machin is now forty-three and begins to feel that he is getting old, that making money and a happy home life are not enough and that he has lost his touch as the entrepreneur and entertainer of the 'Five Towns'. In fact, as he says to himself 'What I want is change - and a lot of it too!'. A chance meeting at the local theatre leads to his going to London and then... (Summary by...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    The 'Card' in question is Edward Henry Machin - His mother called him 'Denry'. This light-hearted story is of his rise from humble beginnings as the son of a washerwoman and sempstress in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, in the pottery towns (which Arnold Bennett christened 'The Five Towns') of the English Midlands; how, by his own wits, enterprise and 'nerve' he rose to wealth, married bliss and public recognition as the youngest-ever mayor of his home town. "'And yet,' demanded Councillor Barlow, 'what's he done? What great cause is he identified with?' 'He's identified,' said the speaker, 'with the great cause of cheering us all up'." (summary by Andy...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Hilda is saved from destitution by Edwin Clayhanger who marries her. The two, with Hilda's son by her disastrous 'marriage' to George Cannon, are living in Bursley. Edwin does not enjoy an entirely happy marriage with Hilda because of her outspokenness. Hilda has strong opinions on matters which at the time were considered to be a male preserve - for example, on Edwin's business. She also does things without telling him. As a consequence, Edwin has his doubts about their marriage and is angered by his wife just as he had been by his father. The book shows how Hilda and Edwin attempt to compromise, its title being a play on words: does it mean "these two" or "these separate"? It is suggested...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    Arnold Bennett describes a method for enjoying literature, and suggests the contents of a comprehensive library. Chapters 1-10 and 14 describe his method for learning to enjoy literature. Chapters 11, 12, and 13 contain detailed lists of the 337 volumes required to complete a comprehensive library of English works. This reading is from the 1913 version at Project Gutenberg, and so does not contain the revisions made by Swinnerton for the 1939 edition, which included authors of the early Twentieth Century. Swinnerton's revisions are available from Wikipedia. (Summary by Timothy...read more

  • Arnold Bennett

    In this light-hearted yet thought-provoking collection of articles, Bennett offers his thoughts on exercising the mind, organising your life, the advantages (and disadvantages) of marriage and other pocket philosophies. The book stands the test of time, and much is still relevant and amusing - perhaps even more so, with nearly 100 years of hindsight, than when it was originally written. The book "X" to which Bennett refers in Chapter 5 is An Essay on the Principle of Population by Thomas Malthus, of which there is also a Librivox recording. (Summary by Ruth...read more