Searching for: "Bertrand Russell"

  • Bertrand Russell

    Bertrand Russell (May 18, 1872 - February 2, 1970) was born in Monmouthshire, into one of the most prominent aristocratic families in Britain. Russell was a philosopher, logician, mathematician, historian, prominent anti-war activist, and an outspoken opponent of nuclear weapons. In 1950, Russell was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. The following is a 1959 speech on nuclear...read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    The Problems of Philosophy' discusses Bertrand Russell's views on philosophy and the problems that arise in the field. Russell's views focus on knowledge rather than the metaphysical realm of philosophy. 'The Problems with Philosophy' revolves around the central question that Russell asks in his opening line of Chapter 1 - Is there any knowledge in the world which is so certain that no reasonable man could doubt it? He examines this question by delving into the idea of reality versus appearance, as for Russell and other philosophers who share his ideas it is sensory perception of the world around them that shapes their knowledge. It is in this work that he discusses his idea of sense-data...read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    A concise version of Bertrand Russell's political philosophy and thoughts, focusing on his favoring of guild socialism. While Russell believed that pure Anarchism should be the ultimate goal, his realism lead him to favor the guild socialism which he expands upon in this volume. Russell first discusses the various aspects of socialism, anarchism, and syndicalism, focusing also on the major men/movements associated with each school - Marx and socialism, Bakunin and anarchy, and CGT (Confederation Generale du Travail) and syndicalism. He then lays out problems that will exist for the future if these philosophies are adhered to and focuses on various areas - including international relations...read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    Dedicated as few men have been to the life of reason, Bertrand Russell has always been concerned with the basic questions to which religion also addresses itself-questions about man's place in the universe and the nature of the good life, questions that involve life after death, morality, freedom, education, and sexual ethics. He brings to his treatment of these questions the same courage, scrupulous logic, and lofty wisdom for which his other work as philosopher, writer, and teacher has been famous. These qualities make the essays included in this collection perhaps the most graceful and moving presentation of the freethinker's position since the days of Hume and Voltaire. Whether...read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    This book records Bertrand Russell's impressions of the new regime after a 1920 visit to Russia following the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution, including his meetings with Lenin, Trostky, and Gorky. It includes a chapter that was authored by Dora Black, educational theorist and feminist author, and Russell's spouse. This chapter was unfortunately removed in the second edition, which was issued after Dora and Bertrand divorced. This recording is dedicated to my darling wife, Jill. Happy Hanukkah and Happy...read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    Bertrand Russel’s 1912 book The Problems of Philosophy was Rusell’s attempt to succinctly summarize problems in the subject of philosophy that prompt discussion among philosophers. In addition to espousing his own philosophies, Russel uses this book to introduce the philosophic principles from other famous philosophers: Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, John Locke, Kant, and others. The book focuses largely on the theory of knowledge and epistemology rather than matters of existence and reality. Russel sought to give light to philosophical problems that were not necessarily the most discussed, stating that he wanted to produce positive thoughts toward subjects that were garnering...read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    Russell sets forth the idea that political ideals must be based upon the ideals that best benefit the individual to create the best life possible. He details the issues that his current economic system and the unequal distribution of wealth present in achieving said ideals. He puts forth his beliefs on what the purposes of an economic system should be, including production and security. He criticizes monopolies and all the damage that they have done. Russell then moves toward a critique of socialism and the connection between the distribution of power and the distribution of wealth. From there, he discusses individual liberty and public control and then expands to national independence and...read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    'The Philosophy of Logical Atomism' is a series of lectures by Bertrand Russell (1872-1970) that touches on numerous topics, including the nature of propositions, the relations of propositions to facts and of different types of words to the varieties of things, what kinds of facts there are, existence, monism and pluralism, and aspects of philosophical logic and of reference. Guiding the lectures, at least according to Russell's headnote to his lectures, is Russell's intent to fully flesh out ideas he learned from his former pupil, Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951). - Summary by Landon D. C....read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    The Problems of Philosophy is one of Bertrand Russell's attempts to create a brief and accessible guide to the problems of philosophy. Focusing on problems he believes will provoke positive and constructive discussion, Russell concentrates on knowledge rather than metaphysics. Russell guides the reader through his famous distinction between "knowledge by acquaintance and knowledge by description" and introduces important theories of Plato, Aristotle, René Descartes, David Hume, John Locke, Immanuel Kant, Georg Hegel and others to lay the foundation for philosophical inquiry by general readers and scholars alike. (Summary from...read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    Remarkably relevant, beautifully written, and filled with wit and wisdom, these three essays by Bertrand Russell allow the listener to test the concepts of the good life, morality, the existence of God, Christianity, and human nature. "What I Believe" was used prominently in the 1940 New York court proceedings in which Russell was judicially declared unfit to teach philosophy at City College of New York. "Why I Am Not a Christian" concludes that churches throughout history have retarded progress and states that we should instead "look to our own efforts here below to make this world a fit place to live in." "A Free Man's Worship," perhaps the most famous single essay written by Russell,...read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    The Problems of Philosophy is one of Bertrand Russell's attempts to create a brief and accessible guide to the problems of philosophy. Focusing on problems he believes will provoke positive and constructive discussion, Russell concentrates on knowledge rather than...read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    Bertrand Russell, 3rd Earl Russell (1872 – 1970) was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, political activist and Nobel laureate. He led the British "revolt against idealism" in the early 1900s and is considered one of the founders of analytic philosophy along with his predecessor Gottlob Frege and his protégé Ludwig Wittgenstein. In this book, written in 1918, he offers his assessment of three competing streams in the thought of the political left: Marxian socialism, anarchism and syndicalism. (Summary by Wikipedia/Carl...read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    Bertrand Russell's A History of Western Philosophy serves as the perfect introduction to its subject. Charting philosophy's course from the pre-Socratics up to the early twentieth century, Russell relates each philosopher and school to their respective historical and cultural contexts, providing erudite commentary throughout his invaluable survey. This engaging and comprehensive work has done much to educate and inform generations of general readers; it is written in accessible and elegantly crafted prose and allows for an easy grasp of complex...read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    'New truth is often uncomfortable,' Bertrand Russell wrote, 'but it is the most important achievement of our species.' In Religion and Science (1961), his popular polemic against religious dogma, he covers the ground from demonology to quantum physics, yet concedes that science cannot touch the profound feelings of personal religious...read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    Six out of seven essays appearing here were reprinted from other publications; indeed, this 1910 collection went out of print, so that two of the essays occurring here were reprinted in Russell's 1917 "Mysticism and Logic, and Other Essays". Nonetheless, this essay records Russell's thinking at a critical juncture, just before the publication of Volume I of the co-authored "Principia Mathematica" and just after the passing of the American pragmatist, William James. These essays record Russell's reactions to pragmatism and its theory of truth, as well as the ethical aspects of philosophy suitable for co-existing alongside the new logical method in philosophy, announced subsequently in the...read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    This metaphysical self-help classic instills happiness within and urges individuals to pursue a content life without sin, boredom, or contempt. Written decades ago with post-war depression in mind, this text has transcended time and continues to give applicable advice for modern-day...read more

  • Bertrand Russell

    'The author is widely regarded as one of the greatest philosophers of the twentieth century and a brilliant writer and commentator on social and political affairs. What I Believe offers a lucid and concise insight into the author's thinking on issues that preoccupied him throughout his life: atheism, religious morality and the impact of science on society. With the addition of two further essays, 'Why I Took to Philosophy' and 'How I Write', this is a superb example of the author as his very...read more