Searching for: "Black Eye Entertainment"

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    Created by Don Quinn, the co-creator of Fibber McGee & Molly, The Halls of Ivy was a situation comedy series that ran on NBC radio from 1950 through 1952. Originally slated to star Gale Gordan and Edna Best, the lead roles went to British husband-and-wife actors Ronald and Benita Colman. The Colman’s were well versed at comedy and already a hit with radio fans having played Jack Benny’s next-door-neighbor on The Jack Benny Program for years. Ronald Colman played William Todhunter Hall, the urbane president of small, rural Ivy College. Benita, played his wife Victoria, a former British musical comedy star. The series chronicled their interactions with students, friends, and...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    The Weird Circle was an anthology of classic thrillers from the pens of the world’s best-known and respected fiction authors of the 19th Century. The focus was horror and suspense stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Robert Louis Stevenson and Mary Shelley (among others) with the occasional drama by Emily Bronte, Charles Dickens and George Eliot. The Weird Circle was produced in New York by NBC and offered in syndication. The narrator of The Weird Circle sat in a cave by a restless sea and instructed a bell keeper to “Toll the bell so all may know that we are gathered again in the weird circle for another strange and weird story from out of the past.” Casts included New...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    The Whistler was one of radio’s top mystery programs airing from May 16, 1942 until September 22, 1955. Sponsored by the Signal Oil Company, The Whistler (Joseph Kearns, Gale Gordon and Bill Forman) was an ominous narrator who knew the killer’s every move even before they did. The stories followed an effective formula in which a person's criminal acts were typically undone by their own missteps. The Whistler often commenting directly upon the action in the manner of a Greek chorus, taunting the criminal from an omniscient perspective. One of the show’s trademarks was the ironic twist endings that helped serve as a payoff for the listener. Radio performers heard in this...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    The Aldrich Family was a popular teenage situation comedy that was heard on radio and seen in films, television and comic books. The creation of playwright Clifford Goldsmith, teenager Henry Aldrich was an endearingly bumbling kid growing awkwardly into adolescence. Episodes revolved around Henry’s misadventures with girls, his family and his friends. Portrayed on radio by 20-something Ezra Stone, The Aldrich Family launched as a summer replacement program for Jack Benny in NBC’s Sunday night lineup, July 2nd, 1939, sponsored by Jell-O. Stone kept the lead role until 1942, when he entered the Army for WWII. Several actors took over until Stone returned to his signature role,...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    The adventures of Captain Midnight came to radio in 1938, originally sponsored by The Skelly Oil Company and later by Ovaltine. Our hero was Captain Jim “Red” Albright, a World War One U.S. Army pilot. His “Captain Midnight” code name was given to him by a general who sent him on a high-risk mission from which he returned precisely at the stroke of Midnight. Albright was recruited by our Government to head the Secret Squadron, an aviation-oriented paramilitary organization fighting sabotage and espionage during the period prior to the United States entering into World War Two. Captain Midnight and his Secret Squadron battled enemies including Ivan Shark, Baron von...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    Escape was radio's leading anthology series of high-adventure, airing on CBS from July 7, 1947 until September 25, 1954. The series' well-remembered opening combined Mussorgsky's Night on Bald Mountain with this introduction, as intoned by Paul Frees and/or William Conrad: “Tired of the everyday grind? Ever dream of a life of romantic adventure? Want to get away from it all? We offer you... Escape!” Following the opening theme, a second announcer (usually Roy Rowan) would add: “Escape! Designed to free you from the four walls of today for a half-hour of high adventure!” Many story premises, both originals and adaptations, involved a protagonist in dire life-or-death...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    Jack Benny liked to portray himself as a skinflint but his generosity as a comic allowed other characters to get their fair share of laughs … usually at his expense. Benny got more laughs playing the straight man and didn’t care if he was the butt of the jokes. With his brilliant timing, smooth delivery, and trademark mannerisms, Benny was a huge influence on the development of the radio sitcom. References to Benny’s reputed stinginess, vanity, and infirmities were expected and weekly running gags established the program’s memorable characters. Benny’s real wife, Mary, was his sarcastic female friend; Phil Harris, the brash bandleader, Dennis Day the eager...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    There were several newspaper-based dramas during radio’s golden age including The Big Story, Casey, Crime Photographer, Box 13, and Let George Do It but Night Beat was a cut above the others. It followed Randy Stone, hard-nosed Chicago Star newsman and his quest for the human-interest story behind the headlines. Hollywood actor Frank Lovejoy voiced the role of Randy Stone, who came to vivid life thanks to expert scripts by Russell Hughes, E. Jack Neumann, John Michael Hayes (who would later write the Hitchcock film classics To Catch a Thief and Rear Window), and Larry Marcus. Lovejoy's distinctive voice and approach to the role, combined with top performances by veteran radio actors...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    This collection contains 12 of the greatest shows ever broadcast during the Golden Age of Radio – including episodes of The Jack Benny Program, Burns & Allen, Gunsmoke, The Amos ‘n' Andy Show, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, Suspense, Dimension X, The Whistler, Sherlock Holmes and more. Radio’s finest actors perform before the microphones, including: Jack Benny, Tom Conway, Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Nigel Bruce, Chester Morris, Dick Powell, Howard Duff, George Burns, Gracie Allen, William Conrad, John Dehner and many more. Relive 12 of the best radio shows from yesterday and the legendary stars that made them amazing in this incredible collection. The Abbott &...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve was a popular character appearing regularly on The Fibber McGee & Molly Show. On August 31, 1941, the character landed his own situation comedy show, The Great Gildersleeve, becoming radio’s first spin-off. Gildy moved from the town of Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where he raised his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie (Lillian Randolph). The Great Gildersleeve was the first show to be centered on a single parent balancing raising children, work, and a social life, accomplished with taste and...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s detective genius, Sherlock Holmes, came to NBC radio in 1930 starring Richard Gordon. By 1939, Basil Rathbone was heard as Holmes with Nigel Bruce as Doctor Watson. The duo was simultaneously starring in a popular series of Sherlock Holmes features for Fox, and later for Universal. By the end of the feature run in the mid 1940’s, Rathbone was eager to separate himself from the radio show to avoid being typecast, and even though the show’s sponsor (Petri Wines) offered him generous pay to continue, he decided to move on. Tom Conway took over with Nigel Bruce continuing as Watson (in this paring Nigel Bruce received top billing). Tom Conway and Nigel...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    Like its predecessor Dragnet – Tales of the Texas Rangers adapted actual police case files for its broadcasts. Leading each week’s investigation of an actual Texas Ranger case was the same Texas Ranger, Jayce Pearson, portrayed by movie star Joel McCrea. Because the stories were set in present day, Pearson used the latest scientific techniques to identify criminals. Unlike Joe Friday, Pearson didn’t have a regular partner, typically working with the local sheriff instead (who was usually portrayed by Parley Baer). Working environments would range from big cities to isolated wilderness areas that could only be reached on horseback. Produced and Directed by Stacy Keach, Sr....read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    Movie star Alan Ladd played Dan Holiday, retired newspaperman turned fiction writer and adventurer extraordinaire. To gain ideas for his books, Holiday placed an ad in the Star-Times newspaper 'Adventure wanted – will go anywhere, do anything – Box Thirteen.' It wasn’t long before his Box Thirteen became jammed with adventures galore. Holiday always had more adventure than he had originally sought, because those who responded to his ad never revealed all of their glorious, unusual, and sometimes sinister details until they met in person and the adventure had already begun. Silvia Picker played Holiday's scatter-brained secretary, Suzy. Suzy added touches of humor to the...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    When real life husband and wife George Burns and Gracie Allen worked together in vaudeville, George was the comic and his wife Gracie had the straight lines. They switched their roles upon discovering that Gracie’s delivery got a bigger laugh than George’s punch lines. The duo became a big hit on vaudeville and in films so when radio beckoned, they delivered. Their first regular radio work was as supporting players on CBS’s The Guy Lombardo Show in the 1930s. When Lombardo switched to NBC, George and Gracie took over the show. Early on, the two did not play a married couple on the air. For a long time, they continued a ‘flirtation act’ with George as...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    This collection contains 12 of the greatest Christmas shows ever broadcast during the Golden Age of Radio! You’ll hear Edmund Gwenn and Natalie Wood reprising their roles from Miracle on 34th Street; Dick Powell as Detective Richard Diamond narrating A Christmas Carol; Eve Arden in a yuletide comedy on Our Miss Brooks; Hal Peary as The Great Gildersleeve; Joel McCrea as lawman Jase Pearson on Tales of the Texas Rangers; Jim & Marian Jordan as Fibber McGee & Molly plus many more! Relive these classic Christmas shows from yesteryear and their legendary stars in this incredible collection. Screen Director’s Playhouse 12-23-49 “Miracle On 34th Street” w/ Edmund...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    In 1935 when Phillips H. Lord created Gang Busters, the crime rate was high and confidence in law enforcement was low. Crimes were highly publicized, and their perpetrators were sometimes glamorized in Hollywood movies. With most radio crime programs dramatizing pulp-fiction stories, Lord decided to portray the procedure and practices of real-life law enforcement officers, basing his dramas on court records and police files. Quite often, at the close of the program, nationwide “clues” consisting of descriptions of suspects and contact information for the relevant police force or FBI, where given out. By May 1942, more than 250 criminals had been apprehended as a result of the...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    Versatile actor John Dehner had a long career (1940-1989) playing countless roles in all media. He appeared in more than 250 films and in thousands of radio and television shows. He began his career as an animator for the Walt Disney Studios but his love for performing found him work at KFWB in Los Angeles as a news editor and disc jockey. Dehner possessed a deep, resonant voice and soon landed supporting roles in radio dramas, including The Whistler, Gunsmoke, and Philip Marlowe. His big break came when he was cast as Paladin in the radio version of Have Gun-Will Travel. He also portrayed J.B. Kendall, the lead role on radio’s Frontier Gentleman. Dehner became one of the most...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    Versatile actor William Conrad had a long career (1945-1993) and was an American World War II fighter pilot, actor, producer, and director whose career spanned five decades in radio, film and television. He appeared in nearly 8,000 radio shows during the golden age and when TV beckoned, he delivered, starring in Cannon (1971-76), Nero Wolfe (1981) and Jake and the Fat Man (1987-1992). He also narrated the television adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle (1959-1964) and The Fugitive (1963-1967). He starred in numerous films, including the The Killers (1946), Body and Soul (1947), Sorry, Wrong Number (1948), Joan of Arc (1948) and The Naked Jungle (1954). His most popular role on radio was...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    Suspense … Radio’s Outstanding Theater of Thrills! Conceived as a potential radio vehicle for Alfred Hitchcock to direct, Suspense was a radio series of epic proportion. It aired on CBS from 1942 to 1962 and is considered by many to be the best mystery/drama series of the golden age. Known as Radio’s Outstanding Theater of Thrills it focused on suspenseful stories starring the biggest names in Hollywood. Early in the run, the episodes were hosted by the “Man in Black” who, from an omniscient perch, narrated stories of people thrown into dangerous or bizarre situations with plots that, at the very end, usually had an unseen twist or two. Hollywood’s finest actors jumped at the...read more

  • Black Eye Entertainment

    Whitehall 1212 was the famous telephone number for Scotland Yard-the headquarters of the London Metropolitan Police Force-and also an exciting true crime drama from the golden age of radio! Written and directed by Wyllis Cooper (the creator of Lights Out and Quiet Please), Whitehall 1212 was a crime drama that aired on NBC from 1951 until 1952. It was hosted by Chief Superintendent John Davidson, curator of the Black Museum, Scotland Yard's repository of death. Similar to The Black Museum, starring Orson Welles, Whitehall 1212 dramatized true-crime cases solved by Scotland Yard. The announcer cued up each episode with, "These are the true stories, the unvarnished facts, just as they...read more