Searching for: "CBS Radio"

  • Franklin D. Roosevelt

    Arthur Godfrey, The Romance of Helen Trent, Our Gal Sunday, The Goldbergs, President Roosevelt's Address to Congress, Amos and Andy, Joe E. Brown, Major Bowes, Louis Prima, and more all in a row! This is a recording of a full broadcast day, remastered (from the National Archives transcript disks) by Joe Bevilacqua. On Thursday, September 21st, 1939, radio station WJSV (CBS) in Washington, D.C., recorded their entire broadcast day - from sign on, to sign off. This was before the advent of magnetic recording tape, so transcription disks were used. The overall quality of these disk recordings is good to excellent, except for a few spots of noticeable distortion and drop out. This...read more

  • CBS Radio

    You Are There is the best radio dramatization I have ever heard. Each show begins with "live" background coverage of the historical event, and then the "on the scene reporters" take over. Everybody knows there were no radio announcers aboard the Niña, Pinta, or Santa María-or from ancient Greece, medieval France, or the Battle of Gettysburg either!-but you will be transported back in time anyway as the show "broadcasts" from the ships, the shore, and from Spain. The dialogue is very believable, historically accurate, and very much in character. It is apparent that the producers of this show did their homework! Let's listen to the announcer now ... "CBS takes you back to 1492. All things...read more

  • CBS Radio

    Bring history back to life through Jim Hodges' historically accurate, exciting, and edifying audio recordings. "You Are There" radio dramatization begins with "live" background coverage of the historical event, and then the "on the scene reporters" take over. Everybody knows there were no radio announcers onboard the Niña, Pinta, or Santa Maria, (or from Ancient Greece, Medieval France, or the Battle of Gettysburg either!) but you will be transported back in time anyway as the show "broadcasts" from the ships, the shore, and from Spain. The dialogue is very believable, historically accurate, and very much in character. It is apparent that the producers of this show did their homework!...read more

  • CBS Radio

    "The Lux Radio Theatre" was radio's most important dramatic hour, commanding the top Hollywood stars, the biggest budgets, and the best writing, directing and sound effects. Cecil B. DeMille, the long-time host, was often shown in publicity photographs as overseeing every aspect of each broadcast, but the reality is that the show's real directors - Tony Stanford, Frank Woodruff, Fred MacKaye and Earl Ebi - did all of the heavy lifting from week to week, including keeping the stars' egos in check and making sure everything went off without a hitch. This collection offers ten broadcasts of "The Lux Radio Theatre", just as originally aired over CBS in 1945 and 1947, transferred directly from...read more

  • CBS Radio

    "The Lux Radio Theatre" was radio's most important dramatic hour, commanding the top Hollywood stars, the biggest budgets, and the best writing, directing and sound effects. Cecil B. DeMille, the long-time host, was often shown in publicity photographs as overseeing every aspect of each broadcast, but the reality is that the show's real directors - Tony Stanford, Frank Woodruff, Fred MacKaye and Earl Ebi - did all of the heavy lifting from week to week, including keeping the stars' egos in check and making sure everything went off without a hitch. This collection offers six broadcasts of "The Lux Radio Theatre", just as originally aired over CBS in 1938 and 1939, transferred directly from...read more

  • CBS Radio

    "Suspense" premiered in 1942 and soon became known for its inventive writing and for casting well-known stars in off-beat roles. In 1947, CBS decided to take a gamble: "Suspense" was turned into a full-hour Saturday night feature, hosted by actor and occasional star Robert Montgomery. Many of the hour-long shows were movie adaptations and, with the permission of the original writers, several earlier programs were expanded to accommodate the increased length. Having failed to attract a sponsor, however, the experiment ended in 1948 and, a couple of months later, the show moved back to its cozy Thursday night berth in its earlier half-hour form. "Radio's Outstanding Theater of Thrills" would...read more

  • CBS Radio

    In this rare and exciting collection, Radio Archives offers you the chance to travel back in time and experience a complete broadcast day from September 1939, including every minute of the day from the 6:00 AM sign-on right through to sign-off at 1:00 AM the next morning. Thanks to the foresight of the Library of Congress and station WJSV in Washington D.C., you'll hear exactly what it was like to listen to the radio in 1939 - including the early morning wake-up show, the soap operas, the news and interviews, a live baseball game from Griffith Stadium, and a speech by President Roosevelt, right through to "Amos 'n' Andy", Major Bowes and his "Original Amateur Hour", a series of live big...read more

  • CBS Radio

    Conceived originally as a program to push the boundaries of network radio, Columbia Workshop became a voice for writers and actors, a voice that America listened to. Columbia Workshop found its true stride in 1937 both as an innovator in radio production, but also in the quality of work it was producing. Columbia Workshop focused on turning quality scripts into quality episodes. Both the extremely intricate production of this program as well as the stories featured rung true with listeners, proving radio drama could indeed be effective and bring something different than its stage and film counterparts. Due to this, Columbia Workshop became a platform for socially conscious productions and...read more

  • CBS Radio

    Although many programs can be described as innovative and cutting edge, one classic from radio's golden era was truly an experiment in what could be done with the medium from its first episode. The concept of Columbia Workshop, conceived by Irving Reis, was to try new innovations on radio. The program focused on both the cutting edge work of sound techs and producers as well as the ability of performers to push themselves in ways other shows did not require them to. Extreme attention was paid to every aspect of production. New tricks and techniques for sound proved to be one of the hallmarks of the program. Columbia Workshop, Volume 1 features episodes that at the time went directions radio...read more

  • CBS Radio

    An often-overlooked aspect of old time radio, overshadowed frequently by the stories told on the shows and the stars that performed them, was the fact that a crucial part of the medium was sound. Columbia Workshop not only paid attention to sound, but advanced how it was used on other programs then and now. Believing that 'production, not the play, was the thing', Irving Reis, the man behind the show, worked to make sure that Columbia Workshop was rich with music, sound, and innovative techniques setting it apart from other programs. Reis produced some cutting edge episodes. Multiple innovations in sound mark Columbia Workshop as a classic radio program, a true vehicle of experimentation...read more

  • CBS Radio

    Raymond Burr stars as the commanding officer of a rugged cavalry outpost in "Fort Laramie," a subtle and realistic dramatic series created, written, and produced by many of the same people who made radio history with the groundbreaking adult western "Gunsmoke". Producer Norman Macdonnell saw the series as "a monument to ordinary men who lived in extraordinary times"; their enemies "the rugged, uncharted country, the heat, the cold, disease, boredom, and, perhaps last of all, hostile Indians." Though its run was short, just 40 episodes in all, "Fort Laramie" proved to be every bit as grand as the critically acclaimed "Gunsmoke" and, today, you'll find it among the top ten shows on the list...read more

  • CBS Radio

    Raymond Burr stars as the commanding officer of a rugged cavalry outpost in "Fort Laramie," a subtle and realistic dramatic series created, written, and produced by many of the same people who made radio history with the groundbreaking adult western "Gunsmoke". Producer Norman Macdonnell saw the series as "a monument to ordinary men who lived in extraordinary times"; their enemies "the rugged, uncharted country, the heat, the cold, disease, boredom, and, perhaps last of all, hostile Indians." Though its run was short, just 40 episodes in all, "Fort Laramie" proved to be every bit as grand as the critically acclaimed "Gunsmoke" and, today, you'll find it among the top ten shows on the list...read more

  • CBS Radio

    Before creating cinematic masterpieces like "Citizen Kane", Orson Welles established his creative credentials with "The Mercury Theatre on the Air", an hour-long showcase which allowed him, producer John Houseman, musical director Bernard Hermann, and a close-knit team of performers and technicians to broadcast innovative adaptations of both well-known and obscure stories - programs that quickly set a new standard for dramatic radio production. Radio Archives is proud to offer an impressive collection containing ten immortal broadcasts of the series, just as originally aired in 1938, transferred directly from the highest quality master recordings and painstakingly restored for the best...read more

  • CBS Radio

    Volume 10 of Suspense! Very few shows are as fondly remembered as one that left listeners sitting on the edge of their seats biting their nails and even a bit afraid at times. Suspense provided its audience with not only chills, thrills, action and adventure, but also expertly written stories and some of the finest performances given by radio's best actors. Show producer William Spier aspired to make Suspense the success it would become. Spier wanted a tense, edge-of-your-seat kind of show - and the best way to get this, in his opinion, was by keeping his entire cast and crew as tense and on-edge as the audience would be. Pitch perfect performances, exceptional production value and tightly...read more

  • CBS Radio

    Volume 11 of Suspense! Very few shows are as fondly remembered as one that left listeners sitting on the edge of their seats biting their nails and even a bit afraid at times. Suspense provided its audience with not only chills, thrills, action and adventure, but also expertly written stories and some of the finest performances given by radio's best actors. Show producer William Spier aspired to make Suspense the success it would become. Spier wanted a tense, edge-of-your-seat kind of show - and the best way to get this, in his opinion, was by keeping his entire cast and crew as tense and on-edge as the audience would be. Pitch perfect performances, exceptional production value and tightly...read more

  • CBS Radio

    Volume 12 of Suspense! Very few shows are as fondly remembered as one that left listeners sitting on the edge of their seats biting their nails and even a bit afraid at times. Suspense provided its audience with not only chills, thrills, action and adventure, but also expertly written stories and some of the finest performances given by radio's best actors. Show producer William Spier aspired to make Suspense the success it would become. Spier wanted a tense, edge-of-your-seat kind of show - and the best way to get this, in his opinion, was by keeping his entire cast and crew as tense and on-edge as the audience would be. Pitch perfect performances, exceptional production value and tightly...read more

  • CBS Radio

    Volume 2 of Suspense! "Radio's Theater of Thrills" premiered in 1942 and, from the start, producer William Spier strived for a tense, edge-of-your-seat kind of program that would both grab and keep the attention of listeners. As it increased in popularity, "Suspense" began to attract Hollywood stars, most of whom had seldom been given the chance to really flex their acting muscles on the air. Spier would test their mettle, frequently casting them against type, but this wasn't a stunt; movie stars were required to deliver the same intense performances as their radio-based co-stars -- and most not only delivered the goods but were thrilled by the opportunity to do so. Heard today, it's...read more

  • CBS Radio

    Volume 3 of Suspense! With a history full of twists and turns, Suspense is a program that lives on as one of the best produced of the classic era as well as a collection of tense, well told stories. Show producer William Spier aspired to make Suspense the success it would become. With his actors he expected nothing less than perfection, but was also willing to risk on-air disaster by often throwing them a curve at the last minute. Spier wanted a tense, edge-of-your-seat kind of show -- and the best way to get this, in his opinion, was by keeping his entire cast and crew as tense and on-edge as the audience would be. Suspense is a true radio classic. For all the Thrills, Chills, and Action...read more

  • CBS Radio

    Volume 6 of Suspense! Very few shows are as fondly remembered as one that left listeners sitting on the edge of their seats biting their nails and even a bit afraid at times. Suspense provided its audience with not only chills, thrills, action and adventure, but also expertly written stories and some of the finest performances given by radio's best actors. Show producer William Spier aspired to make Suspense the success it would become. Spier wanted a tense, edge-of-your-seat kind of show - and the best way to get this, in his opinion, was by keeping his entire cast and crew as tense and on-edge as the audience would be. Pitch perfect performances, exceptional production value and tightly...read more

  • CBS Radio

    Volume 9 of Suspense! Very few shows are as fondly remembered as one that left listeners sitting on the edge of their seats biting their nails and even a bit afraid at times. Suspense provided its audience with not only chills, thrills, action and adventure, but also expertly written stories and some of the finest performances given by radio's best actors. Show producer William Spier aspired to make Suspense the success it would become. Spier wanted a tense, edge-of-your-seat kind of show - and the best way to get this, in his opinion, was by keeping his entire cast and crew as tense and on-edge as the audience would be. Pitch perfect performances, exceptional production value and tightly...read more