Searching for: "Carole Boston Weatherford"

  • Carole Boston Weatherford

    What have I to fear? My master broke every promise to me. I lost my beloved wife and our dear children. All, sold South. Neither my time nor my body is mine. The breath of life is all I have to lose. And bondage is suffocating me. Henry Brown wrote that long before he came to be known as Box; he "entered the world a slave." He was put to work as a child and passed down from one generation to the next-as property. When he was an adult, his wife and children were sold away from him out of spite. Henry Brown watched as his family left bound in chains, headed to the deeper South. What more could be taken from him? But then hope-and help-came in the form of the Underground Railroad. Escape! In...read more

  • Carole Boston Weatherford

    Tracing the history of African Americans in Tulsa's Greenwood district, this book chronicles the devastation that occurred in 1921 when a white mob attacked the Black community. News of what happened was largely suppressed, and no official investigation into the Tulsa Race Massacre occurred for seventy-five years. Sensitively introducing young audiences to this tragedy, Unspeakable concludes with a call for a better future. Please note that you may download an accompanying PDF that provides enhanced materials for this audiobook. To download the PDF please visit...read more

  • Carole Boston Weatherford

    In Birmingham, Alabama, on September 15, 1963, it is one little girl's 10th birthday. Excited about Youth Day at the 16th Street Baptist Church, she puts on her patent leather shoes and practices her choir solo. But her birthday will include no cake and no candles this year. A group of men have tucked a bundle of dynamite under the church's steps, and when it goes off, four girls are dead: AddieMae Collins, Carole Robertson, Cynthia Wesley, and Denise McNair. Smoke clogs the throats of worshippers as they search for sisters, brothers, mothers, and fathers in the crumbled plaster and broken glass. Author Carole Boston Weatherford, an award-winning poet and children's author, shares this...read more

  • Carole Boston Weatherford

    Jesse Owens' mother frequently told him, 'Put your best foot forward.' So Jesse followed her advice, worked hard, and made his dreams come true as one of the greatest Olympic champions of all time. But it wasn't easy, as Jesse had to overcome many obstacles. Even though World War II hadn't started yet, Adolf Hitler controlled Germany during the 1936 Olympics. He wanted to prove during the games that Germans were a superior 'race' to other people of the world. Little did he know that a black American would smash those claims by dominating the games as no athlete had before. Carter G. Woodson Award-winning author Carole Boston Weatherford captures the incredible story of a true American hero...read more

  • Carole Boston Weatherford

    Negro league baseball players didn't always get the respect that major leaguers received. And yet many-including Jackie Robinson, Willie Mays, Hank Aaron, Ernie Banks, and Roy Campanella-quickly became standouts in the major leagues after 1947. Others didn't get to prove their mettle in the majors at all-or not until long past their prime. Leroy 'Satchel' Paige mixed his blazing fastball with 29 other devastating pitches to win 42 games and strike out 402 batters in 1936. Credited with 175 stolen bases in one year, speedster James 'Cool Papa' Bell delighted fans by scoring from first base on a bunt. And powered by steroid-free meals, Josh Gibson hit 75 homeruns in 1931-with one blast...read more

  • Carole Boston Weatherford

    Before she was Marilyn Monroe-Hollywood icon, blond bombshell, and easily one of the most recognizable faces of the twentieth century-she was Norma Jeane, a young woman whose early life was filled with traumatic experiences: foster homes, loneliness, sexual abuse, and teen marriage. Despite all she overcame, her hard-won, meteoric rise to stardom was besieged by exploitation, pill dependency, and depression, eventually culminating in her tragic death at the age of thirty-six. In a story at once riveting, moving, and unflinching, Carole Boston Weatherford tells a tale of extraordinary pain and moments of unexpected grace, of gumption and perseverance, and of the inexorable power of...read more

  • Carole Boston Weatherford

    Despite fierce prejudice and abuse, even being beaten to within an inch of her life, Fannie Lou Hamer was a champion of civil rights from the 1950s until her death in 1977. Integral to the Freedom Summer of 1964, Ms. Hamer gave a speech at the Democratic National Convention that, despite President Johnson's interference, aired on national TV news and spurred the nation to support the Freedom Democrats. Based on the critically acclaimed 2016 Caldecott and Sibert Honor Book and winner of the Boston Globe Horn Book Honor Award, Voice of Freedom celebrates Fannie Lou Hamer's life and legacy with a message of hope, determination, and...read more

  • Carole Boston Weatherford

    As slaves relentlessly toiled in an unjust system in 19th century Louisiana, they all counted down the days until Sunday, when, at least for half a day, they were briefly able to congregate in Congo Square in New Orleans. There, they were free to set up an open market, sing, dance, and play music. They were free to forget their cares, their struggles, and their oppression. This poetic, nonfiction story about this little-known piece of African American history chronicles the daily duties of such slaves-from chopping logs on Mondays to baking bread on Wednesdays to plucking hens on Saturday-and builds to the freedom of Sundays and the special experience of an afternoon spent in Congo...read more

  • Carole Boston Weatherford

    Amid the scholars, poets, authors, and artists of the Harlem Renaissance stood an Afro-Puerto Rican named Arturo Schomburg. This law clerk's life's passion was to collect books, letters, music, and art from Africa and the African diaspora and to bring to light the achievements of people of African descent throughout the ages. When Schomburg's collection became so big that it began to overflow his house (and his wife threatened to mutiny), he turned to the New York Public Library, where he created and curated a collection that was the cornerstone of a new Negro Division. A century later, his groundbreaking collection, known as the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, has...read more

  • Carole Boston Weatherford

    As slaves relentlessly toiled in an unjust system in 19th century Louisiana, they all counted down the days until Sunday, when, at least for half a day, they were briefly able to congregate in Congo Square in New Orleans. There, they were free to set up an open market, sing, dance, and play music. They were free to forget their cares, their struggles, and their oppression. This poetic, nonfiction story about this little-known piece of African American history chronicles the daily duties of such slaves-from chopping logs on Mondays to baking bread on Wednesdays to plucking hens on Saturday-and builds to the freedom of Sundays and the special experience of an afternoon spent in Congo Square,...read more