Searching for: "Charles Alexander Eastman"

  • Charles Alexander Eastman

    Based in part upon the author's own observations and personal knowledge, it was the aim of the book to set forth the status and outlook of the North American Indian. He addressed issues such as Indian schools, health, government policy and agencies, and citizenship in this book. In connection with his writings, Eastman was in steady demand as a lecturer and public speaker with the purpose of interpreting his race to the present age. (Summary in part from "The Indian To-day" by Charles A....read more

  • Charles Alexander Eastman

    CharlesAlexander Eastman, an educated and well-known Sioux, saw both sides of thegreat divide between Indians and whites, and he wrote eleven books attemptingto reconcile the two cultures. Although he was a convert to Christianity,Eastman never lost his sense of the wholeness and beauty of the Indian'srelation to his existence and to the natural world. These sixessays on the Indian's spiritual beliefs and cultural habits, told in verypersonal terms and coupled with seven folk tales, illuminate the high ethicsand morality of a culture that few people know about. The six essays are: "The Great Mystery,""The Family Altar," "Ceremonial and Symbolic Worship," "Barbarism and the MoralCode,"...read more

  • Charles Alexander Eastman

    From the Deep Woods to Civilization is the sequel to Indian Boyhood. Charles Eastman (Ohiyesa) gives his account of what it was like to transition from the ways of his Inidan life to that of the white man. His father, long thought dead, had converted to Christianity and wished the same for his son as well as receiving education in the white man's school. At the age of 15, Ohiyesa must learn to balance the old familiar life of the American Indian with that of the new in the world of the white man, one of his first acts being the cutting of his long hair and attending school. It also chronicles his life of college to becoming a doctor at Pine Ridge in South Dakota, his marriage to Elaine...read more

  • Charles Alexander Eastman

    "We also have a religion which was given to our forefathers, and has been handed down to us their children. It teaches us to be thankful, to be united, and to love one another! We never quarrel about...read more

  • Charles Alexander Eastman

    The author was raised as an American Indian and describes what it was like to be an Indian boy (the first 7 chapters) and an Indian Girl (the last 7 chapters). This is very different from the slanted way the white man tried to picture them as 'savages' and 'brutes.'Quote: Dear Children:—You will like to know that the man who wrote these true stories is himself one of the people he describes so pleasantly and so lovingly for you. He hopes that when you have finished this book, the Indians will seem to you very real and very friendly. He is not willing that all your knowledge of the race that formerly possessed this continent should come from the lips of strangers and enemies, or that you...read more