Searching for: "Charles Dickens"

  • Charles Dickens

    David Copperfield is een roman van Charles Dickens uit 1850. Zoals in vroeger eeuwen tamelijk gebruikelijk was, had het boek in werkelijkheid een lange titel: "The Personal History, Adventures, Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery (which he never meant to be published on any account)." Zoals de meeste van de boeken van Dickens verscheen het eerst als feuilleton; in dit geval in de periode 1848-1850. In dit boek komen nogal wat elementen voor uit Dickens' eigen leven, en daarmee is David Copperfield waarschijnlijk de meest autobiografische roman van Dickens. Zowel voor als na David Copperfield schreef Dickens zeven romans. David Copperfield is...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    Novel by Charles Dickens, published both serially and in book form in 1859. The story is set in the late 18th century against the background of the French Revolution. Although Dickens borrowed from Thomas Carlyle's history, The French Revolution, for his sprawling tale of London and revolutionary Paris, the novel offers more drama than accuracy. The scenes of large-scale mob violence are especially vivid, if superficial in historical understanding. The complex plot involves Sydney Carton's sacrifice of his own life on behalf of his friends Charles Darnay and Lucie Manette. While political events drive the story, Dickens takes a decidedly antipolitical tone, lambasting both aristocratic...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    'Please, sir, I want some more,' Oliver says, holding out his bowl for more gruel, a Dickens scene recognisable to most. A young orphan, Oliver Twist has only ever seen the tough side of life and having to suddenly live on the streets does not make surviving any easier. But being the sweet and innocent boy he is, Oliver eventually manages to attract the compassion of others, and time will reveal secrets about his past that could radically change his bleak future. Originally published in instalments, Oliver Twist (1839) is Charles Dickens' second - and hugely successful - novel. It introduced the concept of the child protagonist in the Victorian novel, and while doing so, plainly criticised...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    David Copperfield is a novel by Charles Dickens and was published in 1850. The story is told in the first person by David Copperfield. Now he is a grown man and tells us the story of his youth and his journey of self-discovery. He had an unhappy childhood, and his father died before he was born. We read his story until his middle-age when he becomes a successful novelist. His journey is full of adventures and numerous friends and enemies. Charles Dickens' prose is Full of tragedy and comedy in equal measure. David Copperfield is considered to be an autobiography. Dickens related early personal experiences that had meant much to him – like his work in a factory as a child, his schooling...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    David Copperfield is een roman van Charles Dickens uit 1850. Zoals in vroeger eeuwen tamelijk gebruikelijk was, had het boek in werkelijkheid een lange titel: 'The Personal History, Adventures, Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery (which he never meant to be published on any account).' Zoals de meeste van de boeken van Dickens verscheen het eerst als feuilleton; in dit geval in de periode 1848-1850. In dit boek komen nogal wat elementen voor uit Dickens' eigen leven, en daarmee is David Copperfield waarschijnlijk de meest autobiografische roman van Dickens. Zowel voor als na David Copperfield schreef Dickens zeven romans. David Copperfield is...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    Schauer- und Spukgeschichten weltberühmter Autoren, die es dem Hörer wohlig-kühl dem Rücken herunterlaufen lassen... Mit dabei: 'Eine Nacht im Jägerhause' (Friedrich Hebbel), 'Eine Nacht in Goslar' (H. Heine), 'Der Sargmacher' (A. Puschkin), 'Wirtshausgeschichten' (C. Dickens) und viele mehr. Ebenso mit dabei: Ein pdf-Dokument mit...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit (commonly known as Martin Chuzzlewit) is a novel by Charles Dickens, considered the last of his picaresque novels. It was originally serialised between 1842 and 1844. While he was writing it Dickens told a friend that he thought it was his best work, but it was one of his least popular novels. The late nineteenth century English novelist George Gissing read the novel in February 1888 'for refreshment' but felt that it showed 'incomprehensible weakness of story'. Like nearly all of Dickens's novels, Martin Chuzzlewit was first published in monthly instalments. Early sales of the monthly parts were disappointing, compared to previous works,...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel. It is his second novel, after David Copperfield, to be fully narrated in the first person. Great Expectations is a bildungsroman, or a coming-of-age novel, and it is a classic work of Victorian literature. It depicts the growth and personal development of an orphan named Pip. The novel was first published in serial form in Dickens's weekly periodical All the Year Round, from 1 December 1860 to August 1861. In October 1861, Chapman and Hall published the novel in three volumes. Dickens originally intended Great Expectations to be twice as long, but constraints imposed by the management of All the Year Round limited the novel's...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    The Personal History, Adventures, Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery (Which He Never Meant to Publish on Any Account), commonly known as David Copperfield, is a novel in the bildungsroman genre by Charles Dickens, narrated by the eponymous David Copperfield, detailing his adventures in his journey from infancy to maturity. It was first published as a serial in 1849-50, and as a book in 1850. David Copperfield is also an autobiographical novel: 'a very complicated weaving of truth and invention', with events following Dickens's own life. Of the books he wrote, it was his favourite. Called 'the triumph of the art of Dickens', it marks a...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    In these five novellas, written specifically for Christmas, Dickens combines his concern for social ills with the myths and memories of childhood and traditional seasonal lore. A Christmas Carol, the first of the selection, has become a touchstone of English festive fiction and an enduring favourite internationally. Repeatedly adapted, parodied, staged and filmed, this richly influential tale is powerfully vivid and moving. The other stories, The Chimes, The Cricket on the Hearth, The Battle of Life and The Haunted Man, blend whimsy, sentiment, comedy, satire, the didactic and the fantastic, developing the themes of joy, giving, and individual and social...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    The youngest child of debtor William Dorrit, Amy is born in Marshalsea prison. She and her father are befriended by Arthur Clennam, whose mother employs 'little Dorrit' as a seamstress. The fortunes of the Dorrits undergo an extreme change when Williams inherits a fortune, and the family move to Italy. Back in England, Arthur Clennam finds himself the victim of a massive fraud and ends up in Marshalsea. There he is found by Little Dorrit, whose fortune has had no effect on her generosity and humility. Arthur realises that she loves him, but it is not until the Dorrit fortune is lost that the two of them can be united at last. Peopled with Dickens' usual host of memorable characters, this...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    David Copperfieldis the timeless tale of a thoughtful orphan discovering how to live and love in a cutthroat, indifferent adult world. It firmly embraces all the eternal freshness, the comic delights, the tender warmth, and the ghastly horrors of childhood. Of all Charles Dickens' novels, this is perhaps the most revealing, both of Dickens himself and of the society of his time. Certainly Copperfield's experiences-his early rejection, child labor in a warehouse, experience as a journalist, and final success as a novelist-are strikingly similar to Dickens' own. It is little wonder that Dickens said of it, 'Of all my books I like this the best...Like many fond parents I have in my heart of...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    Charles Dickens started his literary career as a journalist reporting for ‘The Morning Chronicle,’ a profession which encouraged his observing eye. This collection of essays and short stories was first published in that journal and anticipates, and frequently demonstrates, the genius that was to come.The Sketches ‘Illustrative of Everyday Life and Everyday People’ are a valuable documentary account of existence in the great metropolis during the early part of the nineteenth century and exhibit to the full the waspish wit, joie de vivre and compassion, for which the author was known.From the humorous gossip of ‘The Curate’ to the informative ‘Scotland Yard’ and on to a...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    Featured title on PBS's The Great American Read in 2018 Dickens’ extraordinary novel of Victorian values Great Expectations chronicles the progress of Pip from childhood through adulthood. As he moves from the marshes of Kent to London society, he encounters a variety of extraordinary characters: from Magwitch, the escaped convict, to Miss Havisham and her ward, the arrogant and beautiful Estella. In this fascinating story, Dickens shows the dangers of being driven by a desire for wealth and social status. Pip must establish a sense of self against the plans which others seem to have for him—and somehow discover a firm set of values and priorities. This novel is part...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    Penguin Classics presents the audiobook adaptation of Martin Chuzzlewit, a tale of inheritiance and destiny and the story Dickens considered his best. Read by John Wells. The greed of his family has led wealthy old Martin Chuzzlewit to become suspicious and misanthropic, leaving his grandson and namesake to make his own way in the world. And so young Martin sets out from the Wiltshire home of his supposed champion, the scheming architect Pecksniff, to seek his fortune in America. In depicting Martin's journey - an experience that teaches him to question his inherited self-interest and egotism - Dickens created many vividly realized figures: the brutish lout Jonas Chuzzlewit, plotting to...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    The Mudfog Papers was written by Victorian era novelist Charles Dickens and published from 1837-38 in the monthly literary serial Bentley's Miscellany, which he then edited. They were first published as a book as 'The Mudfog Papers and Other Sketches. The Mudfog Papers relates the proceedings of the fictional 'The Mudfog Society for the Advancement of Everything', a Pickwickian parody of the British Association for the Advancement of Science founded in York in 1831, one of the numerous Victorian learned societies dedicated to the advancement of Science. Like The Pickwick Papers, The Mudfog Papers claim affinity with Parliamentary reports, memoirs, and posthumous papers. The serial was...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    A Tale of Two Cities is a novel by Charles Dickens, set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. With well over 200 million copies sold, it ranks among the most famous works in the history of fictional literature. The novel depicts the plight of the French peasantry demoralized by the French aristocracy in the years leading up to the revolution, the corresponding brutality demonstrated by the revolutionaries toward the former aristocrats in the early years of the revolution, and many unflattering social parallels with life in London during the same time period. It follows the lives of several protagonists through these events. The 45-chapter novel was published in 31...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    'Our Mutual Friend', Dickens' last complete novel, gives one of his most comprehensive and penetrating accounts of Victorian society. Its vision of a culture stifled by materialistic values emerges not just through its central narratives, but through its apparently incidental characters and scenes.'Our Mutual Friend', Dickens' last complete novel, gives one of his most comprehensive and penetrating accounts of Victorian society. Its vision of a culture stifled by materialistic values emerges not just through its central narratives, but through its apparently incidental characters and scenes. The chief of its several plots centres on John Harmon who returns to England as his father's heir....read more

  • Charles Dickens

    This comic masterpiece is read by Paul Schofield. It has been noted also by Dickens' biographer, Forster, that it marked a crucial phase in the author's development as he began to delve deeper into the 'springs of character'. 'Martin Chuzzlewit' is Charles Dickens' comic masterpiece about which his biographer, Forster, noted that it marked a crucial phase in the author's development as he began to delve deeper into the 'springs of character'.Old Martin Chuzzlewit, tormented by the greed and selfishness of his family, effectively drives his grandson, young Martin, to undertake a voyage to America. It is a voyage which will have crucial consequences not only for young Martin, but...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    Dickens worked on David Copperfield for two years between 1848 and 1850, carefully planning out the plot and structure. Seven novels precede it, and seven novels would come after it, Copperfield being his mid-point novel.The story deals with the life of David Copperfield from childhood to maturity. David is born in England in about 1820. David's father had died six months before he was born, and seven years later, his mother marries Mr Edward Murdstone. David is given good reason to dislike his stepfather and has similar feelings for Mr Murdstone's sister Jane, who moves into the house soon afterwards. Mr Murdstone thrashes David for falling behind with his studies. Following one of these...read more