Searching for: "Devdutt Pattanaik"

  • Devdutt Pattanaik

    Are the illustrious clans of the Mahabharata from Surya Vansh or Chandra Vansh? Which yuga does the Ramayana occur in, and does it occur only once? What do haldi, kumkum, bhasm or chandan signify in a puja thali? After the sensational response to Season 1 of EPIC Channel’s Devlok with Devdutt Pattanaik, Devdutt invited his viewers and readers to ask him questions about Hindu mythology, which he has answered over thirty thrilling episodes. Prepare to be educated, entertained and moved as Devdutt delves into the exhilarating variety of Hindu mythology. In this volume, you will discover the difference between dhyan and darshan, aastik and nastik, Surya Vansh...read more

  • Devdutt Pattanaik

    Patriarchy asserts men are superior to women Feminism clarifies women and men are equal Queerness questions what constitutes male and female Queerness isn’t only modern, Western or sexual, says mythologist Devdutt Pattanaik. Take a close look at the vast written and oral traditions in Hinduism, some over two thousand years old, and you will find tales of: Shikhandi, who became a man to satisfy her wife Mahadeva, who became a woman to deliver a devotee’s child Chudala, who became a man to enlighten her husband Samavan, who became the wife of his male friend and many more . . . Playful and touching—and sometimes disturbing—these stories when compared with tales of the...read more

  • Devdutt Pattanaik

    Devdutt Pattanaik is the author of over twenty-five books and 500 articles on the relevance of mythology in modern times. Trained in medicine (MBBSfrom Grant Medical College, Mumbai University), he worked in the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries for fifteen years before devoting all his time to his passion for decoding beliefs of all cultures, modern and ancient, located beneath the veneer of rationality. To know more, visit...read more

  • Devdutt Pattanaik

    Hindus have one God. They also have 330 million gods: male gods; female gods; personal gods; family gods; household gods; village gods; gods of space and time; gods for specific castes and particular professions; gods who reside in trees; in animals; in minerals; in geometrical patterns and in man-made objects. Then there are a whole host of demons. But no Devil. In this groundbreaking book Dr Devdutt Pattanaik; one of India’s most popular mythologists; seeks an answer to these apparent paradoxes and unravels an inherited truth about life and death; nature and culture; perfection and possibility. He retells sacred Hindu stories and decodes Hindu symbols and rituals; using a unique...read more

  • Devdutt Pattanaik

    • Olympus is the home of the Greek gods, much like Amravati of the Hindu devas. • Zeus, leader of Olympians, wields a thunderbolt like Indra and rides an eagle like Vishnu. • The feats of the Greek hero Heracles, known to Romans as Hercules, reminded many of Krishna, as did his name, ‘Hari-kula-esha’ or lord of the Hari clan. • The Greek epic of a husband sailing across the sea with a thousand ships to bring his wife, Helen, back from Troy seems strikingly similar to the story of Ram rescuing Sita from Lanka. Is there a connection between Greek and Hindu mythology then? Does it have something to do with a common Indo-European root? Or maybe an...read more

  • Devdutt Pattanaik

    ‘I am not sure that I am a man,’ said Yuvanashva. ‘I have created life outside me as men do. But I have also created life inside me, as women do. What does that make me? Will a body such as mine fetter or free me?’ Among the many hundreds of characters who inhabit the Mahabharata, perhaps the world’s greatest epic and certainly one of the oldest, is Yuvanashva, a childless king, who accidentally drinks a magic potion meant to make his queens pregnant and gives birth to a son. This extraordinary novel is his story. It is also the story of his mother Shilavati, who cannot be king because she is a woman; of young Somvat, who surrenders his genitals to become a...read more

  • Devdutt Pattanaik

    Jaya: An Illustrated Retelling Of The Mahabharata has the whole epic, which was originally known as Jaya, condensed into a tiny capsule in this book. Other than retelling the interesting parts of the Mahabharata, what makes this book a favourite among the readers is Pattanaik rendering of the various local folklores and tales that are associated with the epic, which have been presented in a whole new genre. With a master stroke, the author has elaborated the storyline by including lesser known folklore stories of the epic, while keeping intact its original form and style. The book has been divided into 108 chapters and has vivid illustrations along with 250 simple line drawings painted...read more

  • Devdutt Pattanaik

    In the forest of insecurities, is it possible to discover humanity through pleasure? Can we stop seeing each other as predator, prey, rival or mate, and rediscover ourselves as lovers? Does the divine reside in sensual delight, in emotional intimacy and in aesthetic experience? Yes, yes, yes. That is the promise of the Bhagavata. The Bhagavata is the story of Krishna, known as Shyam to those who find beauty, wisdom and love in his dark complexion. It is the third great Hindu epic after the Mahabharata and the Ramayana. However, this narration was composed in fragments over thousands of years, first as the Harivamsa, then as the Bhagavata Purana, and finally as the passionate songs...read more

  • Devdutt Pattanaik

    Sita: An Illustrated Retelling of Ramayana is an epic story based on the life of India’s most admired prince- ‘Rama’ and his wife ‘Sita’. Ramayana is a mythological story, which is being passed on from past many generations. Since ages, the character that is most emphasized has been that of Rama, who has always been known to keep his word whatever be the circumstances. The role of Sita has been generally overlooked in the past. Sita too is a pivotal character being a single mother; she went through many ups and downs all alone. Still, she has often been portrayed as a frail and meek character. In the present book, the author has emphasized on this very fact...read more

  • Devdutt Pattanaik

    Why are identity cards important, even for gods? How can you tell a Deva from a Manava? How would you find a particular god in a crowd of gods? One day, when Krishna wanted to board an aeroplane, he was not allowed to! All because he did not have an identity card. Then his friends Garuda and Sesha took him to meet Lata-kumari in Guwahati, who told him the story of Anasuya and the Ashwini twins, and why Rishi Chavan made a rule that all gods should carry a dhvaja a flag with each god's very own symbol. Did Krishna get his identity card so he could ride the aeroplane...read more

  • Devdutt Pattanaik

    Why is the cow useful to everyone? How are the earth and the cow similar? Why is Gauri another name for a cow? Little girl Gauri thinks milk comes from packets, till she meets Sweety the talking cow. Sweety tells Gauri about the first cow on earth, Surabhi, and how she provided so many useful things to man fuel, manure, medicine and shelter. Sweety narrates stories about a king who found good luck because he gifted cows to many people, and how another king was turned into a lizard because he was not careful about who he gave his cows to! Sweety also tells Gauri how Krishna the cowherd looked after his beloved animals, and why Kali decided to comb her...read more

  • Devdutt Pattanaik

    Why was Indra an unhappy god? What are the many magical things Indra has in paradise? Will Indra ever find happiness? Little Harsha was sad, so a cloud flew him up to Indra's palace, just to show Harsha that the king of gods was sadder than him! There, with his new friends Indra and Airavata, the six-tusked white elephant, Harsha sees so many amazing things a wish- fulfilling tree, a pot of never- ending gold, and a potion that keeps him healthy. Then Indra thinks of a naughty plan to steal Vasishta's cow! When he catches Indra, a very angry Vasishta tells him the secret to being happy. (And no, it has nothing to do with ice creams, video games or wish-fulfilling trees.) But will the king...read more

  • Devdutt Pattanaik

    Business Sutra: A Very Indian Approach To Management,published in 2013, introduces readers to the Indian way of management, which is very different from the commonly followed Western methods. Modern management, which is taught in business schools all across the globe, is rigidly goal-oriented, and lays extreme importance on increasing shareholder value. Ancient India was famous for its trade and commerce, thus management has long been a part and parcel of this country’s tradition. The author has used stories, rituals, and symbols from Indian mythology to provide a more subjective way of approaching management. Business Sutra: A Very Indian Approach To Management emphasizes on the...read more