Searching for: "Douay-Rheims Version"

  • Douay-Rheims Version

    The Additions to Daniel comprise three chapters not found in the Hebrew/Aramaic text of Daniel. The text of these chapters is found in the Greek Septuagint and in the earlier Old Greek translation. They are accepted as canonical and translated as such in Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox Bibles. They are listed in Article VI of the Thirty-Nine Articles of the Church of England. However, most Protestant Versions exclude these passages as apocryphal, retaining only the text available today in the Hebrew/Aramaic manuscripts. The additions are: The Prayer of Azariah and Song of the Three Holy Children : Daniel 3:24-90 inserted between verses 23 and 24 (v. 24 becomes v....read more

  • Douay-Rheims Version

    The Book of Baruch consists of exhortation to Jews in exile to accept exile, hope for the mercy of God, and resist the temptation to worship idols of the nations. The Book of Baruch, occasionally referred to as 1 Baruch, is called a deuterocanonical or apocryphal book of the Bible. Although not in the Hebrew Bible, it is found in the Greek Bible (LXX) and in the Vulgate Bible, and also in Theodotion's Version. There it is found among the prophetical books which also include Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, and the twelve minor prophets. It is named after Baruch ben Neriah, Jeremiah's scribe. Scholars propose that it was written during or shortly after the period of the...read more

  • Douay-Rheims Version

    1 Maccabees is an apocryphal/deuterocanonical book written by a Jewish author after the restoration of an independent Jewish kingdom, probably about 100 BC. It is included in the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox canons. Protestants, Jews, and some others regard it as generally reliable historically, but not a part of Scripture. The setting of the book is about a century after the conquest of Judea by the Greeks under Alexander the Great, after Alexander's empire has been divided so that Judea was part of the Greek Seleucid Empire. It tells how the Greek ruler Antiochus IV Epiphanes attempted to suppress the practice of basic Jewish religious law, resulting in a Jewish revolt against Seleucid...read more

  • Douay-Rheims Version

    An additional six chapters appear interspersed in Esther in the Septuagint, the Greek translation, which then was noted by Jerome in compiling the Latin Vulgate; additionally, the Greek text contains many small changes in the meaning of the main text. The extra chapters include several prayers to God, perhaps because it was felt that the above-mentioned lack of mention of God was inappropriate in a holy book. Jerome recognized them as additions not present in the Hebrew Text and placed them at the end of his Latin translation as chapters 10:4-16:24. However, some modern Catholic English Bibles restore the Septuagint order, such as Esther in the NAB. (Summary by...read more

  • Douay-Rheims Version

    The story revolves around Judith, a daring and beautiful widow, who is upset with her Jewish countrymen for being unwilling to engage their foreign conquerors. She goes with her loyal if reluctant maid Abra to the camp of the enemy general, Holofernes, to whom she slowly ingratiates herself, promising him both sexual favors and information on the Israelites. Gaining his trust (though not having delivered on either promise), she is allowed access to his tent one night as he lies in a drunken stupor. She decapitates him, then takes his head back to her fearful countrymen. The Assyrians, having lost their leader, disperse, and Israel is saved. Though she is courted by many, she remains...read more

  • Douay-Rheims Version

    The book tells the alleged story of a righteous Israelite of the Tribe of Naphtali named Tobit living in Nineveh after the deportation of the northern tribes of Israel to Assyria in 721 BC under Sargon II. (Summary by Wikipedia, modified by Sam...read more

  • Douay-Rheims Version

    Judith is the 18th book of the Bible and one of the historical books in the Old Testament. The overall theme is the power of prayer. The Israelites are beseiged by the forces of Holofernes and pray to God to overcome the forces. Judith seduces Holofernes and beheads him in his sleep, when the forces find their leader dead, they flee in battle. The Israelites benefit from their spoils and Judith sings praises to God. (Summary by Sean...read more

  • Douay-Rheims Version

    Tobias is the 17th book of the Bible and one of the historical books in the Old Testament. In the text, Raphael, after revealing his angelic nature, commanded both father and son to tell all the wonders that God had done to them and write it in a book. It is likely that the parts of the book written in first person singular are an autobiography of Tobias the elder. It was written originally during the Babylonian Exile, in the early portion of the seventh century B.C.; and that all except the last chapter was the work of Tobias the elder and his...read more

  • Douay-Rheims Version

    Wisdom is one of the apocryphal/deuterocanonical books of the Bible. It is a wisdom book, bearing similarity to the canonical works. Scholars believe that the book represents the most classical Greek language found in the Septuagint, having been written during the Jewish Hellenistic period (the 1st or 2nd century BC). The author of the text appears well versed in the popular philosophical, religious, and ethical writings adopted by Hellenistic Alexandria. According to St. Melito in the second century AD, it was considered canonical by Jews and Christians,[1] and a Hebrew translation of the Wisdom of Solomon is mentioned by Na?manides in the preface to his commentary on the Pentateuch.The...read more

  • Douay-Rheims Version

    LibriVox's 2006 Christmas Colletion containing public domain short stories, essays, poems, and scripture passages recorded by a variety of LibriVox...read more

  • Douay-Rheims Version

    The Book of 2 Machabees (more commonly rendered 2 Maccabees) is an abridgement of another work, now lost, which describes the events surrounding the defeat of Antiochus IV Epiphanes and the rededication of the Jewish temple in the 2nd Century BCE. It's canonicity (status as Holy Writ) was established later in the Christian era, and hence forms part of the deuterocanon (2nd canon). It is excluded from the Jewish bibles as well as modern Protestant bibles. The Church of England, in 1571, affirmed that 2 Machabees, as well as several other books excluded from the Protestant canon, "the Church doth read for example of life and instruction of manners; but yet doth it not apply them to establish...read more