Searching for: "Ed Yong"

  • Ed Yong

    Enter a new dimension—the world as it is truly perceived by other animals—from the Pulitzer Prize-winning, New York Times bestselling author of I Contain Multitudes. “A stunning achievement, steeped in science but suffused with magic.”—Siddhartha Mukherjee, author of The Gene The Earth teems with sights and textures, sounds and vibrations, smells and tastes, electric and magnetic fields. But every kind of animal, including humans, is enclosed within its own unique sensory bubble, perceiving but a tiny sliver of our immense world.  In An Immense World, author and Pulitzer Prize–winning science journalist Ed Yong coaxes us beyond the confines...read more

  • Ed Yong

    New York Times Bestseller New York Times Notable Book of 2016 NPR Great Read of 2016 Economist Best Books of 2016 Brain Pickings Best Science Books of 2016 Smithsonian Best Books about Science of 2016 Science Friday Best Science Book of 2016 A Mother Jones Notable Read of 2016 A Bill Gates “Gates Notes” Pick MPR Best Books of 2016 Chicago Public Library Best of the Best Books of 2016 Minnesota Star-Tribune Best of the Year A Kirkus Best Book of the Year A PW Best Book of the Year Guardian Best of the Year Times (London) Best of the Year Joining the ranks of popular science classics like The Botany of Desire and The Selfish Gene, a...read more

  • Ed Yong

    Your body is teeming with tens of trillions of microbes. It’s an entire world, a colony full of life. In other words, you contain multitudes. These microscopic companions sculpt our organs, protect us from diseases, guide our behaviour, and bombard us with their genes. They also hold the key to understanding all life on earth. In I Contain Multitudes, Ed Yong opens our eyes and invites us to marvel at ourselves and other animals in a new light, less as individuals and more as thriving ecosystems. We learn the invisible and wondrous science behind the corals that construct mighty reefs and the squid that create their own light shows. We see how bacteria can alter our response...read more

  • Ed Yong

    Brought to you by Penguin. Humans have three or four colour-detecting cones in their retinas. Mantis shrimp have 16. In fact, their eyes seem to have more in common with satellite technology than with biological vision as we currently understand it. They have evolved to track movement with an acuity no other species can match by processing raw information; they may not 'see', in the human sense, at all. Marine molluscs called chitons have eyes which are made of stone. Scorpions appear to see with their entire bodies. It isn't only vision that differs from species to species - some animals also have senses we lack entirely. Knifefish navigate by electrical charge. An Immense World...read more