Searching for: "Edd Mcnair"

  • Keisha Ervin

    You’ve seen them in print before, and their books are hot, hot, hot! Now see what Edd McNair, Keisha Ervin, and Brenda Hampton can do when they join forces to bring you three stories in the latest installment of Girls from da Hood. Being married to notorious gangsta rapper Sean Pynn isn’t as glamorous as it appears to be. Behind closed doors, Queen is dealing with knock-down drag-out fights, verbal abuse, and neglect. When her bodyguard, Ahsim, comes into the picture, things change in a hurry. When a man thinks his woman is cheating, he keeps tabs on her. When a woman thinks her man is cheating, she calls Jakki. Rochel “Jakki” Thomas’ way of catching a man in the act is a...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    Fresh from his self-imposed exile in New York, Black makes his long-awaited return, reuniting with his brothers Junie and Dee to handle the family business—moving mad weight, expanding their drug empire, and eliminating any and everything that gets in their way. Unfortunately, such wheeling and dealing always comes with a price, and for Black, Junie, and Dee, it’s no different. With a roller-coaster-like plot that twists and turns until the very end, Edd McNair’s Black Reign II keeps it real and gives listeners a look at the hood from the inside like never...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    When a military soldier dies, everyone feels the pain. When a street soldier dies, only those close to him mourn. But both soldiers have something in common: they fought for what they believed in. Home from their final tour, a team from the 82nd Airborne Division out of Ft. Bragg, NC faces harsh realities: a broken relationship, the death of a child, and even the murder of one of their own. They quickly realize that whether you're raised on a military base and trained in the military, or you come from the hard knocks of the projects and you are trained to go, a soldier is a soldier. Confident that their skills can be used on American soil to produce American dollars, these soldiers, armed...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    The best and most revered works of famed poet and author, Edgar Allen...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, Poe’s only full novel, is one of his most unusual works. A riveting story, in the first person, it tells of a disastrous sea voyage involving storms, mutiny, starvation, thirst and a mysterious conclusion. Jorge Luis Borges and Baudelaire were among those who rated it highly. The recording is timed to mark the 200th anniversary of Poe’s...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    Stories include: The Raven; Hop-Frog; The Black Cat; The Cask of Amontillado; The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar; The Fall of the House of Usher; The Gold-Bug; The Masque of the Red Death; The Murders in the Rue Morgue; The Purloined Letter; The Pit and the Pendulum; and The Tell-Tale...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    Edgar Allan Poe is the undisputed originator of the detective story. His brilliant, imaginative sleuth C. Auguste Dupin set the stage for eccentric, logic wielding investigators like Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot. This audio collection of Poe’s three Dupin stories also includes one non-Dupin detective tale, “Thou Art the Man.” It features celebrity narrator Bronson Pinchot. The story titles are: “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” “The Mystery of Marie Rogêt,” “The Purloined Letter,” and “Thou Art the Man.” “A fantastic listen…Pinchot’s funny accent work is quite unexpectedly perfect for the Dupin...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    First published in a 1843 edition of The Saturday Evening Post, The Black Cat tells the story of a man and his increasingly antagonistic relationship with his cat. Akin to The Tell-Tale Heart and The Cask of Amontillado, The Black Cat investigates the psychological effects of guilt as well as the potentially destructive and violent consequences of...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    First published in a 1846 edition of Godey's Lady's Book, The Cask of Amontillado is widely considered to be one of the most perfect short stories ever written. Told by the unreliable narrator Montresor-a man who sought vengeance against his acquaintance for an insult that the reader is not privy to-the story details how Montresor accomplished his...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    Inspired by an account in The Broadway Journal of a surgeon putting a patient into an magnetic sleep, The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar is a suspenseful tale concerning the forestallment of death by hypnosis. Originally published without a clear indication of its fictionality, the story was assumed to be a true account by some of its original...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    First published in a 1839 edition of Burton's Gentleman's Magazine, The Fall of the House of Usher is the story of the declining physical and psychological health of the residents of the House of Usher-and the way in which the house itself reflects that. Gothic in theme and style, the story is an exemplar of Poe's philosophy of composition, which dictates that literary works should be short, methodological, and have a unity of effect wherein all the elements of the story are related and...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    The grand-prize winner of a writing contest sponsored by the Philadelphia Dollar Newspaper, The Gold-Bug was one of Poe's most popular stories during his lifetime. Similar to his ratiocination tales-early versions of what we now call detective fiction-The Gold-Bug is full of mystery and adventure and includes a cryptogram, invisible ink, a scarab-like bug, and pirate...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    First published in a 1842 edition of Graham's Lady's and Gentleman's Magazine, The Masque of the Red Death tells the story of Prince Prospero as he tries to avoid a plague by confining himself and his nobles to a masquerade in an abbey. Often considered a gothic allegory, the story reflects on not only life and death but also the illusion of...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    First published in a 1841 edition of Graham's Magazine, The Murders in the Rue Morgue is often cited as the first modern detective story. The first of three stories to center around C. Auguste Dupin, Poe's fictional detective, The Murders in the Rue Morgue involves Dupin's investigation of two women's murders. Establishing many of the tropes that would later become common to detective fiction, the story begins with an explanation of Dupin's theory of ratiocination, a concept which greatly influenced the creation of detective fiction itself and other great detectives like Sherlock Holmes and Hercule...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    First published in a 1842 literary annual The Gift: A Christmas and New Year's Present for 1843, The Pit and the Pendulum takes place during the Spanish Inquisition and follows the plight of a prisoner in a cell that has a pit and a pendulum. Unlike many of Poe's short stories, The Pit and the Pendulum does not rely on any supernatural elements to inspire fear but instead uses the narrator's heightened sensory experiences to do...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    First published in a 1844 literary annual The Gift: A Christmas and New Year's Present for 1845, The Purloined Letter is the third and final story that features Poe's detective, C. Auguste Dupin. In it, Dupin is approached by the prefect of the police to help with a case that involves a stolen letter containing compromising...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    Perhaps Poe's most famous work, The Raven was first published in 1845 in the New York Evening Mirror. Known for its tight rhymes, rhythm, and the repetitive response given by the eponymous raven-Nevermore-the poem focuses on that raven and a forlorn man who is distraught over his lost lover,...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    First published in a 1843 edition of The Pioneer, The Tell-Tale Heart is one of Poe's best-known stories. In it, an unreliable narrator is increasingly troubled by the clouded eye of the old man he lives with. Similar to The Black Cat, The Tell-Tale Heart focuses on the effects of mental instability, crime, and...read more

  • Edd Mcnair

    First published in a 1849 edition of The Flag of Our Union, Hop-Frog is a revenge tale akin to The Cask of Amontillado. Told from the perspective of a crippled jester who was taken from his homeland and has been abused by the king he serves, the story focuses on the revenge Hop-Frog takes after the king strikes his fellow countrywoman and performer, the dancer...read more

  • Charles Dickens

    A chilling double-feature from two of the most celebrated writers of all time! In Charles Dickens' The Signalman, the titular character (played by Sylvester McCoy of Doctor Who and The Hobbit) recounts to a traveling writer (Anthony D.P. Mann) the terrifying tale of a ghostly spectre who forewarns of death and tragedy. Meanwhile, in a lively adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe's The Cask of Amontillado, a despicable rival of the noble Claudio Montressor gets his just desserts in this darkly comedic tale of revenge and...read more