Searching for: "Edith Wharton"

  • Edith Wharton

    BBC radio productions of classic works by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Edith Wharton - plus two bonus documentaries American author Edith Wharton is renowned for her merciless satires of marriage and money, set in the upper-class milieu into which she was born. Included here are a superb selection of her novels, short stories and plays, recorded for BBC Radio - as well as two programmes exploring her life and work. The House of Mirth - Bewitching socialite Lily Bart is hunting for a wealthy husband - but time is running out... Starring June Barrie, Carole Mowlam and Keith Alexander. Madame de Treymes - John Durham's fight for the woman he loves sparks a confrontation with a...read more

  • Edith Wharton

    Edith Wharton (1862-1937) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist and short story writer. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927, 1928 and 1930. Among her most popular and terrifying tales are the many masterly ghost stories which she wrote in her early career. This selection presents six of her best tales: "Afterward", "The Eyes", "The Debt", "Kerfol", "Miss Mary Pask" and "Pomegranate...read more

  • Edith Wharton

    Penguin Classics presents Edith Wharton's Ethan Frome, adapted for audio and available as a digital download as part of the Penguin English Library series. Read by Nathan Osgood. 'He seemed a part of the mute melancholy landscape, an incarnation of its frozen woe, with all that was warm and sentient in him fast bound below the surface' Ethan Frome works his unproductive farm and struggles to maintain a bearable existence with his difficult, suspicious and hypochondriac wife, Zeena. But when Zeena's vivacious cousin enters their household as a 'hired girl', Ethan finds himself obsessed with her and with the possibilities for happiness she comes to represent. In one of American...read more

  • Edith Wharton

    Edith Wharton. Perhaps best known for her classic novel The Age of Innocence Wharton loved the short story form because its brevity allowed her to concentrate on telling the story. In these three powerful stories, Edith Wharton transports the listener to the turn of the century where she depicts (without turning to sensationalism) the shocking topics of the time. Often, she opens just after an incident allowing the listener to be immersed straight into the story. In Souls Belated we meet a couple on a train, digesting and reacting to that morning's event. In The Muse's Tragedy, a young man meets his favourite poet's muse and soon uncovers the truth about their much talked about...read more

  • Edith Wharton

    "The real loneliness is living among all these kind people who only ask one to pretend!" Awarded the 1921 Pulitzer Prize, the first to be presented to a woman, Edith Wharton's The Age of Innocence is a powerful depiction of love and desire in New York's glamorous Gilded Age. When Newland Archer, happily engaged to May Welland, meets fiancé's cousin Ellen, his entire future is cast into doubt: strong-willed, witty, and entirely unpretentious, Ellen is unlike any woman he has ever met. He is torn between his infatuation for her and his duty to marry May. In subtle and elegant language, Wharton delivers a critical look at the social mores of the...read more

  • Edith Wharton

    Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist Edith Wharton was most well known for her novels that illuminated privileged life in the 19th century, such as The Age of Innocence and The House of Mirth. In addition to her award-winning novels, she also wrote poetry and short stories. Collected here are some of her best works of short fiction, including: 'The Eyes,' a famous ghost story; 'The Daunt Diana,' which tells about the love of art; 'The Moving Finger,' an eerie story about a man clinging to his wife's memory; and 'The Debt,' a story of...read more

  • Edith Wharton

    Set in the 1870s, the same period as Wharton's The Age of Innocence, The Buccaneers is about five wealthy American girls denied entry into New York Society because their parents' money is too new. At the suggestion of their clever governess, the girls sail to London, where they marry lords, earls, and dukes who find their beauty charming—and their wealth extremely useful.After Wharton's death in 1937, The Christian Science Monitor said, 'If it could have been completed, The Buccaneers would doubtless stand among the richest and most sophisticated of Wharton's novels.' Now, with wit and imagination, Marion Mainwaring has finished the story, taking her cue from Wharton's own synopsis....read more

  • Edith Wharton

    Edith Newbold Jones was born in New York on January 24, 1862. Born into wealth, this background of privilege gave her a wealth of experience to eventually, after several false starts, produce many works based on it culminating in her Pulitzer Prize winning novel ‘The Age Of Innocence’Marriage to Edward Robbins Wharton, who was 12 years older in 1885 seemed to offer much and for some years they travelled extensively. After some years it was apparent that her husband suffered from acute depression and so the travelling ceased and they retired to The Mount, their estate designed by Edith. By 1908 his condition was said to be incurable and prior to divorcing Edward in 1913 she began an...read more

  • Edith Wharton

    Edith Wharton's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel Newland Archer is a young lawyer, a member of New York's high society, and engaged to be married to May Welland.Countess Ellen Olenska is May's cousin, and wants a divorce from the Polish nobleman she married. Intelligent and beautiful, she comes back to New York where she tries to fit into the high society life she had before her marriage. Her family and former friends, however, are shocked by the idea of divorce within their social circle, and she finds herself snubbed by her own class.When Ellen and Newland fall in love, will they be able to choose between passion and conventions?This novel is part of Brilliance Audio's extensive Classic...read more

  • Edith Wharton

    A full-cast dramatisation of Edith Wharton's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about a passionate love affair which breaks all the rules of the restrictive high society of 1870s New York. In the exclusive world of upper-class New York, in which attendance at balls and dinner passes for occupation, Newland Archer anticipates his marriage to May Welland, a beautiful young girl from a suitable family 'who knows nothing and expects everything'. Into this well-ordered community May's cousin, the captivating and exotic Countess Olenska, arrives. She has returned from Europe after the collapse of her marriage and alternately enchants and outrages New York society with her cosmopolitan lifestyle....read more

  • Edith Wharton

    A BBC Radio 4 full-cast dramatisation of Edith Wharton’s 1913 satire of marriage and money in early-20th century American society. The play follows the beautiful Undine Spragg as she arrives in New York and sets her sights on Ralph Marvell, then travels to Paris where she meets a charming French aristocrat. Will Undine ever find real happiness? Starring Rebecca Night as Undine Spragg and Barbara Barnes as Mrs Spragg. Also included in the cast are Lorelei King, Jonathan Keeble, William Houston, Lucy Gaskell, Paul McCleary, Provence Maydew, Tom Hollander, Dan Stevens, Tessa Nicholson, Olwen May, Joseph Kloska and Daniel Rogers. Dramatised by Jane Rogers and directed by Nadia Molinari. ...read more

  • Virginia Woolf

    Unabridged readings of four fictional masterpieces Contained in this collection are four more enduring classics, read in full by some of the very best audiobook narrators. With over 32 hours of irresistible storytelling, tracked by chapter for ease of navigation, this is the perfect way to immerse yourself in these iconic works. Wuthering Heights Emily Brontë's tempestuous tale of passions, betrayal and retribution on the wild Yorkshire moors. Read by Susan Jameson. Silas Marner George Eliot's heart-warming tour de force about a lonely weaver's search for redemption and hope. Read by Sean Baker. Ethan Frome Edith Wharton's powerful, affecting novella about a poverty-stricken...read more

  • Edith Wharton

    An original compilation of eight of Edith Wharton’s gothic stories A ghostly presence in “The Lady’s Maid’s Bell” desires revenge against a tyrannical husband. In “Mr. Jones,” Lady Jane Lynke inherits an estate unexpectedly, and can’t make sense of how to manage the servants—especially since the caretaker has been dead for decades, but keeps giving orders. Meanwhile, in “Afterward,” a newly wealthy American couple moves into a large, isolated house in southern England complete with a ghost … and the mysteries surrounding the husband’s business are slowly uncovered. In “The Hermit and the Wild Woman,” the “hermit,” while a young boy, witnessed the killing...read more

  • Edith Wharton

    The Age of Innocence centers on an upper-class couple's impending marriage, and the introduction of a woman plagued by scandal whose presence threatens their happiness. Though the novel questions the assumptions and morals of 1870s' New York society, it never devolves into an outright condemnation of the institution. In fact, Wharton considered this novel an "apology" for her earlier, more brutal and critical novel, The House of Mirth. Not to be overlooked is Wharton's attention to detailing the charms and customs of the upper caste. The novel is lauded for its accurate portrayal of how the 19th-century East Coast American upper class lived, and this, combined with the social tragedy,...read more

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald

    Ten superbly narrated stories that help explain America by America's best writers. Irving's incredible and amusing tale of the archetypal 'Rip Van Winkle' relates the story of a man who slept through history. Stephen Crane's 'The Red Badge of Courage' tells of a young soldier who must struggle with his conscience no matter what the consequences. 'The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County' is Mark Twain's hilarious story of a contest to end all contests in the rowdy days of the Forty-Niners. Edgar Allan Poe's 'The Man of the Crowd' tells of one man's strange fascination with another. 'The Ransom of Red Chief' is another of O. Henry's tales of a kidnapping that goes horribly, horribly,...read more

  • Edith Wharton

    The Glimpses of the Moon is written by Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, short story writer, and designer Edith Wharton (1862 –1937). It was published in 1920. Set in the early 1920s, this novel continues Edith Wharton's examination of New York society. Nick Lansing and Susy Branch are both barely getting by in the wealthy social circles they move in and they can't afford to get married. They make a deal. They will get married and stay together as long as they can but when they run out of money, they can divorce each...read more

  • Edith Wharton

    The House of Mirth (1905), by Edith Wharton, is the story of Lily Bart, a well-born, but penniless woman of the high society of New York City, who was raised and educated to become wife to a rich man, a hothouse flower for conspicuous consumption. As an unmarried woman with gambling debts and an uncertain future, Lily is destroyed by the society who created her. Written in the style of a novel of manners, The House of Mirth was the fourth novel by Edith Wharton (1862–1937), which tells the story of Lily Bart against the background of the high-society of upper class New York City of the 1890s; as a genre novel, The House of Mirth (1905) is an example of American literary...read more

  • Edith Wharton

    Ethan Frome is a novel by Edith Wharton, set in the fictional New England town of Starkfield. There a visiting engineer tells the story of his encounter with Ethan Frome, a man with a history of thwarted dreams and desires. The accumulated longing of Frome ends in an ironic turn of events. His initial impressions are based on his observations of Frome going about his mundane tasks in Starkfield, and something about him catches the eye and curiosity of the visitor, but no one in the town seems interested in revealing many details about the man or his history—or perhaps they are not able to. The narrator ultimately finds himself in the position of staying overnight at Frome's house in order...read more

  • Edith Wharton

    'I tell you there's nothing the public likes as much as convictions – they'll always follow a man who believes in his own ideas. And this book is just on the line of popular interest.' Professor Linyard is a man of science. And when he writes a book to great acclaim in which he takes the side of religion, he fully expects the satire to be understood. But when it's taken at face value, he goes along with it to better provide for his family. Is Professor Linyard a sellout or merely a good provider? 'The Descent of Man' is a brilliant short story by Edith Wharton that leaves it to the reader to finds the answers. B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in 2007, wanting...read more

  • Edith Wharton

    'You won't know till afterward. You won't know till long, long afterward.' When Ned and Mary Boyne hear that their new house is haunted, they laugh it off and joke that every good house in the countryside must have a ghost for it to be worth purchasing. They move in and forget all about its supposed supernatural quirks. But when Mary notices a strange change in her husband's behaviour, she begins to suspect a not so friendly ghost is indeed at play. 'Afterward' is a chilling and disturbing short story that starts out on a happy note and then slowly unravels. It's made all the more haunting by Edith Wharton's impeccable prose. B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back in...read more