Searching for: "Emily Dickinson"

  • Emily Dickinson

    Emily Dickinson, born in 1830, was the granddaughter of the founder of Amherst College. Except for a few journeys when she was young, Emily lived the life of a recluse in her father's house, spending her days writing poems and letters. In 1862, she sent a few of her poems to a publisher. He replied that her work was too unusual, too different. This was her first and last attempt to reach the public ear. From then on, she bound her work in small hand-stitched collections that she kept in her bureau drawer. After Emily's death in 1885, her sister discovered over a thousand poems hidden away in drawers and boxes. Although Emily's experiences were limited, her poems are profound, often playful,...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Born in Massachusetts in 1830, Emily Dickinson composed over 1770 poems; but apart from her closest friends, no-one knew she was writing at all. Only after her death was her astonishing output discovered and published. A reclusive figure for much of her life, few could have imagined the range of her subjects, the intensity of her imagination or the powerful delicacy of her writing. Emily Dickinson is one of America's greatest writers. This selection includes 147 of her best known poems, and is a perfect introduction to her unique...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Born in Massachusetts in 1830, Emily Dickinson composed over 1770 poems; but apart from her closest friends, no-one knew she was writing at all. Only after her death was her astonishing output discovered and published. A reclusive figure for much of her life, few could have imagined the range of her subjects, the intensity of her imagination or the powerful delicacy of her writing. Emily Dickinson is one of America’s greatest writers. This selection includes 147 of her best known poems, and is a perfect introduction to her unique...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Emily Dickinson is one of the most intriguing of American poets. Since she grew increasingly reclusive, very few of her poems were published until after her death. This collection includes two letters Dickinson wrote to her friends on the occasion of the deaths of her friend, Mr. Humphrey, and her brother, Austin. The rest of collection consists of her poetry on the subject of death. (Summary by Libby...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 8 recordings of Mother Nature by Emily Dickinson. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for June 3, 2013 While Emily Dickinson was a prolific private poet, fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime. The work that was published during her lifetime was usually altered significantly by the publishers to fit the conventional poetic rules of the time. Dickinson's poems are unique for the era in which she wrote; they contain short lines, typically lack titles, and often use slant rhyme as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation. Many of her poems deal with themes of death and immortality, two recurring...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) was a reclusive poet whose only friendships were carried out by letter. She wrote nearly 1800 poems in her life, but very few were published until after her death. In this volume the poems are presented in chronological order in their original form, unaltered by editorial revision. It offers a wide-angle view of Dickinson's poetic development, from the clunky rhyme schemes of her youth, through valentines she wrote in the early 1850s, to the gloomy writings of her last...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Emily Dickinson today has gaining her deserved place alongside Walt Whitman as one of the two greatest American poets of the nineteenth century. Beginning always with particulars of personal experience, her poems encompass life and death, love and longing, joyfulness and sorrow. With sparse, precise language, she conveyed a penetrating vision of the natural world and an acute understanding of the most profound human truths. The poems included in this collection are grouped by three time periods, 1890, 1891, and 1896, and by the subjects of life, love, nature, and time and...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Emily Dickinson has come to be regarded as one of the quintessential poets of 19th century America. A very private poet with a very quiet and reclusive life, her poetry was published posthumously and immediately found a wide audience. While she echoed the romantic natural themes of her times, her style was much more free and irregular, causing many to criticize her and editors to “correct” her. In the early 20th century, when poetic style had become much looser, new audiences learned to appreciate her work. Here collected are many of her most contemplative, most rebellious, and “dark” works, expressing her frustrations with the behavioral confines of her times, and the confines...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was born in 1830 in Amherst Massachusetts. Rightly regarded as a major American poet, her life was sheltered, introverted, and reclusive. Despite writing over 1800 poems, only a dozen or so were published during her lifetime. Her structures and wordings are at times difficult to get to grips with, though recurring themes of religion and death certainly shadow many of her works. At her death is 1886, it is likely her work might have been lost had it not been for a publication by her sister. Indeed it was only in the 1950s that a complete and unedited collection of her works was published. In the ensuing half century she has gradually climbed into the...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Renowned poet Emily Dickinson (1830 – 1886) wrote many many poems. This collection, “Poems: Series One”, presents the first installment of the complete poetic works of Miss Emily Dickinson. It is broken into four parts: Life, Love, Nature, and Time and Eternity. The verses of Emily Dickinson belong emphatically to what Emerson long since called “the Poetry of the Portfolio,”–something produced absolutely without the thought of publication, and solely by way of expression of the writer’s own mind. The poetry found here is then entirely honest, and indicative of the authors true...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 15 recordings of Because I Could Not Stop For Death by Emily Dickinson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for May 12, 2013. Despite Dickinson's prolific writing, fewer than a dozen of her poems were published during her lifetime. After her younger sister Lavinia discovered the collection of nearly eighteen hundred poems, Dickinson's first volume was published four years after her death. Until the 1955 publication of Dickinson's Complete Poems by Thomas H. Johnson, her poems were considerably edited and altered from their manuscript versions. Since 1890 Dickinson has remained continuously in print. (Summary by...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 27 recordings of The Lovers by Emily Dickinson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for May 27, 2012. The verses of Emily Dickinson belong emphatically to what Emerson long since called "the Poetry of the Portfolio,"-something produced absolutely without the thought of publication, and solely by way of expression of the writer's own mind. Such verse must inevitably forfeit whatever advantage lies in the discipline of public criticism and the enforced conformity to accepted ways. On the other hand, it may often gain something through the habit of freedom and the unconventional utterance of daring thoughts. In the case of the present author, there was absolutely...read more

  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

    January - the first month of the year in the Gregorian calendar ushers in the New Year. The cold and bleak landscape of winter however provides a rich background for our esteemed poets such as Byron, Longfellow, Cowper and Bronte to offer us their reflections and counterpoints. Among our readers are Richard Mitchley and Ghizela Rowe. The tracks are; January - An Introduction; January 1 1828 By Nathaniel Parker Willis; Written January The 1st, 1792 By Janet Little; Written January 1st 1832 By Henry Alford; Promises That Fail Their Makers Lips By Daniel Sheehan; The Old Year By John Clare; At The Entering Of The New Year By Thomas Hardy; Written During An Aurora Borealis January 7th...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    101 poems by one of America's greatest poets, sensitively read by actress Marian...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Esta es una colección de 24 poemas de la poeta Americana más famosa de la lengua inglesa. Emily Dickinson fue una poeta fenomenal, no sólo por sus artes innovadoras sino por su historia personal, la imagen que la vida formó en ella, y que le dio el aura de leyenda. Sus extraordinarios poemas no respetan las reglas tradicionales de la poesía, y la gran mayoría carece de...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 16 recordings of The Railway Train by Emily Dickinson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for May 28, 2011. Although Dickinson was a prolific private poet, fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime. The work that was published during her lifetime was usually altered significantly by the publishers to fit the conventional poetic rules of the time. Dickinson's poems are unique for the era in which she wrote; they contain short lines, typically lack titles, and often use slant rhyme as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation. Many of her poems deal with themes of death and immortality, two recurring...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 11 recordings of She sweeps with many-colored Brooms by Emily Dickinson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for February 24, 2013. Dickinson was a prolific private poet, but fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime. The work that was published during her lifetime was usually altered significantly by the publishers to fit the conventional poetic rules of the time. Dickinson's poems are unique for the era in which she wrote; they contain short lines, typically lack titles, and often use slant rhyme as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation.(Summary from...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    The Land of the Free, the Home of the Brave. This illustrious phrase encapsulates the aspirations of America and its people. In this volume we feature 50 American poets beginning with the Colonist Anne Bradstreet in the 17th century, when American poetry was entirely rooted in its parental British forms. From here our classic poets take us through Centuries of history, through Independence and expansion Westward, across the cities and vast landscapes of their words. Along the journey we also meet the Imagists, the poets from the Harlem Renaissance by way of the Transcendentalists and the Fireside Poets. The giants of the poetic way loom large; Walt Whitman. Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allan...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    The Land of the Free, the Home of the Brave. This illustrious phrase encapsulates the aspirations of America and its people. In this volume we feature 50 American poets beginning with the Colonist Anne Bradstreet in the 17th century, when American poetry was entirely rooted in its parental British forms. From here our classic poets take us through Centuries of history, through Independence and expansion Westward, across the cities and vast landscapes of their words. Along the journey we also meet the Imagists, the poets from the Harlem Renaissance by way of the Transcendentalists and the Fireside Poets. The giants of the poetic way loom large; Walt Whitman. Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allan...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 13 recordings of I Stepped from Plank to Plank by Emily Dickinson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for August 21, 2011. Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was an American poet. Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life. Thought of as an eccentric by the locals, she became known for her penchant for white clothing and her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, even leave her room. Most of her friendships were therefore carried out by correspondence.( Summary by...read more