Searching for: "Emily Dickinson"

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 20 different recordings of A Word Is Dead, by Emily Dickinson. This was the weekly poetry for the week of July 06, 2008. Version 4 read by Sean McGaughey and Rose...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 6 different recordings of One day is there of the series by Emily Dickinson. This was the weekly poetry project for the week of November 25th,...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Poem XXI: "A Book", read by the wonderful podcasters at the Podcasters Across Borders 2006 conference, in Kingston, Ontario, June 23-24,...read more

  • Rudyard Kipling

    On a summer's day we have perhaps all wish to take flight and view life and the world from the vantage point of a clear blue sky. Our feathered friends do it as a matter of course and in this volume some of our finest wordsmith's speak with imagination, longing and desire on their...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Arthur Hugh Clough (kluf) was an English poet, an educationalist, and the devoted assistant to ground-breaking nurse Florence Nightingale. He was the brother of suffragist Anne Clough, who became principal of Newnham College, Cambridge. - Summary by...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 9 recordings of The Song Against Songs by G. K. Chesterton. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for October 16, 2011. Chesterton was a large man, standing 6 feet 4 inches (1.93 m) and weighing around 21 stone (130 kg; 290 lb). His girth gave rise to a famous anecdote. During World War I a lady in London asked why he was not 'out at the Front'; he replied, 'If you go round to the side, you will see that I am.' On another occasion he remarked to his friend George Bernard Shaw: "To look at you, anyone would think a famine had struck England". Shaw retorted, "To look at you, anyone would think you have caused it". P. G. Wodehouse once described a very loud...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Read in English by Ann Simmons; CaprishaPage; David Lawrence; Joe Brenneman; Jason Mills; venom3071; Jannie Meisberger; Julia Niedermaier; John Sercel; Jacob Paul Starr; Lee Ann Howlett; Larry Greene; Maryanka; Maria Kasper; ravenotation;...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Love. What is love?The question is asked by each of us but the answer remains elusive. Dictionaries summon up many words but none fulfill. Love itself is often ethereal, felt but only seen in a glance, a look, a fleeting touch. Part of Love’s beauty is perhaps in the fact that the question never can be adequately answered; its ephemeral, a chimera of the heart and only felt. Our own experiences are unique and personal to ourselves and of little help defining it for another.Love is perhaps best expressed through poetry. As Plato said 2500 years ago “At the touch of a lover, everyone becomes a poet”. Writing a love poem for ones’ partner is seen as the most romantic of gestures....read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    This is a Century for the history books. The Chinese curse of living in interesting times could not be more suited.A small island continued its expansion across the globe bringing both good and evil in its march. Empires clashed. Revolution shook many. The Industrial Age was upon us.Poets spoke up against slavery bringing social and political pressure upon an abominable horror. It was also the Age of the Romantics; Shelley, Keats, Byron lyrically rapture. Tennyson, Arnold, Browning rode a century of sweeping change of dynamism and great...read more