Searching for: "Emily Dickinson"

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 20 different recordings of A Word Is Dead, by Emily Dickinson. This was the weekly poetry for the week of July 06, 2008. Version 4 read by Sean McGaughey and Rose...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 9 recordings of The Song Against Songs by G. K. Chesterton. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for October 16, 2011. Chesterton was a large man, standing 6 feet 4 inches (1.93 m) and weighing around 21 stone (130 kg; 290 lb). His girth gave rise to a famous anecdote. During World War I a lady in London asked why he was not 'out at the Front'; he replied, 'If you go round to the side, you will see that I am.' On another occasion he remarked to his friend George Bernard Shaw: "To look at you, anyone would think a famine had struck England". Shaw retorted, "To look at you, anyone would think you have caused it". P. G. Wodehouse once described a very loud...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Born in Massachusetts in 1830, Emily Dickinson composed over 1770 poems; but apart from her closest friends, no-one knew she was writing at all. Only after her death was her astonishing output discovered and published. A reclusive figure for much of her life, few could have imagined the range of her subjects, the intensity of her imagination or the powerful delicacy of her writing. Emily Dickinson is one of America’s greatest writers. This selection includes 147 of her best known poems, and is a perfect introduction to her unique...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 13 recordings of Summer Shower by Emily Dickinson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for January 10th,...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Summer - An Introduction. Summer beckons each and every one of us to its warm embrace. For many of us it is the season we can most enjoy; the days are long and warm and all manner of things become easier. Nature shows us her most colourful side as she fills the landscape with colours and textures of every hue. As for ourselves we all seem a little more approachable, a little more likable. For poets the Summer season conjures up many themes and images. Keats, Blake, Dickinson, Tennyson, Longfellow, take us through many of these facets ably joined by Meynell, Pope, Van Dyke, Stevenson and many others. This volume is poured from the mouths of Ghizela Rowe and Richard...read more

  • Rudyard Kipling

    Spring - An Introduction. Spring by tradition begins the renewal both of ourselves and of nature. The very sound of the word suggests impetus and movement and people do seem taken with the notion that the year's journey is about to begin. The days become longer, warmer and the fresh green of new growth begins to show itself. All manner of life start to busy themselves with activities and plans. In this collection of poetry Wordsworth, Browning, Kipling & Yeats are familiar voices to which Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Daniel Sheehan, Amy Lowell and Christina Rossetti and others bring their words of insight, charm and emotion. It's a rich and rewarding combination. This collection is...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Whether we understand it or recognise it, it is women who have shaped the course and journey of humanity. We are all born from women and usually raised by women. Half the world's population is female but many of them are trodden down by misogyny, religious misinterpretation, failing systems of education and welfare and all manner of other ills that shame us all. In a world where, gender, colour, race and orientation are still stumbling blocks to inclusion, women's words are too often unheard and neglected.Whilst the world has moved measurably forward in recent decades, although not enough, some progress has been made. Our poets wrote at a time when their basic rights as human beings...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 11 recordings of She sweeps with many-colored Brooms by Emily Dickinson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for February 24, 2013. Dickinson was a prolific private poet, but fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime. The work that was published during her lifetime was usually altered significantly by the publishers to fit the conventional poetic rules of the time. Dickinson's poems are unique for the era in which she wrote; they contain short lines, typically lack titles, and often use slant rhyme as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation.(Summary from...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Emily Dickinson has come to be regarded as one of the quintessential poets of 19th century America. A very private poet with a very quiet and reclusive life, her poetry was published posthumously and immediately found a wide audience. While she echoed the romantic natural themes of her times, her style was much more free and irregular, causing many to criticize her and editors to “correct” her. In the early 20th century, when poetic style had become much looser, new audiences learned to appreciate her work. Here collected are many of her most contemplative, most rebellious, and “dark” works, expressing her frustrations with the behavioral confines of her times, and the confines...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Arthur Hugh Clough (kluf) was an English poet, an educationalist, and the devoted assistant to ground-breaking nurse Florence Nightingale. He was the brother of suffragist Anne Clough, who became principal of Newnham College, Cambridge. - Summary by...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 16 recordings of The Railway Train by Emily Dickinson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for May 28, 2011. Although Dickinson was a prolific private poet, fewer than a dozen of her nearly eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime. The work that was published during her lifetime was usually altered significantly by the publishers to fit the conventional poetic rules of the time. Dickinson's poems are unique for the era in which she wrote; they contain short lines, typically lack titles, and often use slant rhyme as well as unconventional capitalization and punctuation. Many of her poems deal with themes of death and immortality, two recurring...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    This is a Century for the history books. The Chinese curse of living in interesting times could not be more suited.A small island continued its expansion across the globe bringing both good and evil in its march. Empires clashed. Revolution shook many. The Industrial Age was upon us.Poets spoke up against slavery bringing social and political pressure upon an abominable horror. It was also the Age of the Romantics; Shelley, Keats, Byron lyrically rapture. Tennyson, Arnold, Browning rode a century of sweeping change of dynamism and great...read more

  • Rudyard Kipling

    June - the sixth month of the year in our Gregorian calendar and the official beginning of Summer. The days stretch to their longest and many subjects and thoughts fill the minds of our Poets such as Dryden, Levy, Raleigh, Blunt and Dickenson as they describe the warming days. Among our readers are Richard Mitchley and Ghizela Rowe. The tracks are; June - An Introduction; Knee Deep In June By James Whitcomb Riley; A June Tide Echo By Amy Levy; June By William Cullen Bryant; There Is A June When Corn Is Cut By Emily Dickinson; Sweet Empty Sky of June By Henry Vaughan; June 14th By Maria Frances Cecilia Cowper; Dusk In June By Sara Teasdale; Wishes Of An Elderly Man Wished At A Garden...read more

  • William Shakespeare

    July - the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian calendar and Summer is a rich harvest of colours and sights. Poets of the calibre of Shakespeare, Keats, Pope, Whitman and Tennyson describe and marshall their thoughts for our delight. Among our readers are Richard Mitchley and Ghizela Rowe. The tracks are; July - An Introduction; July 2nd 1863 By Tom Reynolds; America, From The National Ode July 4th 1876 By James Bayard Taylor; 4th July 1882, Malines, Midnight By James Kenneth Stephen; Fourth Of July By Julia A Moore; July 4th 1857 By Alfred Gibbs Campbell; Ode For July 4th 1917 By HP Lovecraft; Ode For The 4th Of July By James Monroe Whitfield; Sonnet LVII - Summit Of Skiddaw, July...read more

  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

    January - the first month of the year in the Gregorian calendar ushers in the New Year. The cold and bleak landscape of winter however provides a rich background for our esteemed poets such as Byron, Longfellow, Cowper and Bronte to offer us their reflections and counterpoints. Among our readers are Richard Mitchley and Ghizela Rowe. The tracks are; January - An Introduction; January 1 1828 By Nathaniel Parker Willis; Written January The 1st, 1792 By Janet Little; Written January 1st 1832 By Henry Alford; Promises That Fail Their Makers Lips By Daniel Sheehan; The Old Year By John Clare; At The Entering Of The New Year By Thomas Hardy; Written During An Aurora Borealis January 7th...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was born in 1830 in Amherst Massachusetts. Rightly regarded as a major American poet, her life was sheltered, introverted, and reclusive. Despite writing over 1800 poems, only a dozen or so were published during her lifetime. Her structures and wordings are at times difficult to get to grips with, though recurring themes of religion and death certainly shadow many of her works. At her death is 1886, it is likely her work might have been lost had it not been for a publication by her sister. Indeed it was only in the 1950s that a complete and unedited collection of her works was published. In the ensuing half century she has gradually climbed into the...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Man's best friend. An always faithful ally.Whether the dog is domesticated as a pet and there to enjoy life with a family or as a work-dog herding sheep, helping to hunt, police or guard, the dog has proved time and time again to have many invaluable uses. They come in all shapes and sizes from sought after breeds to lowly mongrels each with an array of qualities that give them distinct personalities. From earliest times dogs have been able to find a unique place fulfilling the needs of their keepers and often there is equal devotion from master to servant. A dog's life no longer has to have negative connotations as so many pooches are loved, extravagantly fed, groomed, petted and pawed...read more

  • Rudyard Kipling

    On a summer's day we have perhaps all wish to take flight and view life and the world from the vantage point of a clear blue sky. Our feathered friends do it as a matter of course and in this volume some of our finest wordsmith's speak with imagination, longing and desire on their...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Angels are undeniably associated with religion and more usually Christianity, Islam and Judaism. Often they are seen as supernatural beings, benevolent celestial intermediaries interposed between God, Heaven and humanity.They are protectors, our heavenly guides, and the servants of God. They are also His Messengers. The faithful seek their blessing, their help. A visitation is a miraculous event, filled with reverence, awe and shared with the wider community as a sign that faith has reward.Other religions also make note of angelic contributions including Sikhism and Zoroastrianism. There is also the unnerving distinction that there are 'fallen Angels' that seep dark, malevolent forces into...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    It is often said that two things are unavoidable; Death and Taxes. Certainly the latter is a common thorn in adult life but as to the former it seems that for many people it is merely a hiccup in Life's eternal journey. A journey they wish, if being of good deed and character, to share at the eternity of Heaven's largesse, a reward for Faith and the obligations of Religion. Of course for those not so fortunate an altogether different experience was prepared for them; Hell. For those who take religion as their companion Heaven conjures up all manner of eternal delights. Here we take the thoughts and words of such greats as Gerald Manley Hopkins, WB Yeats, Rupert Brooke, Emily Dickinson and...read more