Searching for: "Emily Dickinson"

  • Emily Dickinson

    Born in Massachusetts in 1830, Emily Dickinson composed over 1770 poems; but apart from her closest friends, no-one knew she was writing at all. Only after her death was her astonishing output discovered and published. A reclusive figure for much of her life, few could have imagined the range of her subjects, the intensity of her imagination or the powerful delicacy of her writing. Emily Dickinson is one of America’s greatest writers. This selection includes 147 of her best known poems, and is a perfect introduction to her unique...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Emily Dickinson has come to be regarded as one of the quintessential poets of 19th century America. A very private poet with a very quiet and reclusive life, her poetry was published posthumously and immediately found a wide audience. While she echoed the romantic natural themes of her times, her style was much more free and irregular, causing many to criticize her and editors to “correct” her. In the early 20th century, when poetic style had become much looser, new audiences learned to appreciate her work. Here collected are many of her most contemplative, most rebellious, and “dark” works, expressing her frustrations with the behavioral confines of her times, and the confines...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 27 recordings of The Lovers by Emily Dickinson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for May 27, 2012. The verses of Emily Dickinson belong emphatically to what Emerson long since called "the Poetry of the Portfolio,"-something produced absolutely without the thought of publication, and solely by way of expression of the writer's own mind. Such verse must inevitably forfeit whatever advantage lies in the discipline of public criticism and the enforced conformity to accepted ways. On the other hand, it may often gain something through the habit of freedom and the unconventional utterance of daring thoughts. In the case of the present author, there was absolutely...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Born in Massachusetts in 1830, Emily Dickinson composed over 1770 poems; but apart from her closest friends, no-one knew she was writing at all. Only after her death was her astonishing output discovered and published. A reclusive figure for much of her life, few could have imagined the range of her subjects, the intensity of her imagination or the powerful delicacy of her writing. Emily Dickinson is one of America's greatest writers. This selection includes 147 of her best known poems, and is a perfect introduction to her unique...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 12 recordings of If I Can Stop One Heart From Breaking by Emily Dickinson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for June 27th,...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    "The eagerness with which the first volume of Emily Dickinson's poems has been read shows very clearly that all our alleged modern artificiality does not prevent a prompt appreciation of the qualities of directness and simplicity in approaching the greatest themes,—life and love and death. That "irresistible needle-touch," as one of her best critics has called it, piercing at once the very core of a thought, has found a response as wide and sympathetic as it has been unexpected even to those who knew best her compelling power. This second volume, while open to the same criticism as to form with its predecessor, shows also the same shining beauties." (Summary by Mabel Loomis Todd, from...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Renowned poet Emily Dickinson (1830 – 1886) wrote many many poems. This collection, “Poems: Series One”, presents the first installment of the complete poetic works of Miss Emily Dickinson. It is broken into four parts: Life, Love, Nature, and Time and Eternity. The verses of Emily Dickinson belong emphatically to what Emerson long since called “the Poetry of the Portfolio,”–something produced absolutely without the thought of publication, and solely by way of expression of the writer’s own mind. The poetry found here is then entirely honest, and indicative of the authors true...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Emily Dickinson is one of the most intriguing of American poets. Since she grew increasingly reclusive, very few of her poems were published until after her death. This collection includes two letters Dickinson wrote to her friends on the occasion of the deaths of her friend, Mr. Humphrey, and her brother, Austin. The rest of collection consists of her poetry on the subject of death. (Summary by Libby...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Emily Dickinson today has gaining her deserved place alongside Walt Whitman as one of the two greatest American poets of the nineteenth century. Beginning always with particulars of personal experience, her poems encompass life and death, love and longing, joyfulness and sorrow. With sparse, precise language, she conveyed a penetrating vision of the natural world and an acute understanding of the most profound human truths. The poems included in this collection are grouped by three time periods, 1890, 1891, and 1896, and by the subjects of life, love, nature, and time and...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 15 recordings of Because I Could Not Stop For Death by Emily Dickinson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for May 12, 2013. Despite Dickinson's prolific writing, fewer than a dozen of her poems were published during her lifetime. After her younger sister Lavinia discovered the collection of nearly eighteen hundred poems, Dickinson's first volume was published four years after her death. Until the 1955 publication of Dickinson's Complete Poems by Thomas H. Johnson, her poems were considerably edited and altered from their manuscript versions. Since 1890 Dickinson has remained continuously in print. (Summary by...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Esta es una colección de 24 poemas de la poeta Americana más famosa de la lengua inglesa. Emily Dickinson fue una poeta fenomenal, no sólo por sus artes innovadoras sino por su historia personal, la imagen que la vida formó en ella, y que le dio el aura de leyenda. Sus extraordinarios poemas no respetan las reglas tradicionales de la poesía, y la gran mayoría carece de...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Poem XXI: "A Book", read by the wonderful podcasters at the Podcasters Across Borders 2006 conference, in Kingston, Ontario, June 23-24,...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 13 recordings of Summer Shower by Emily Dickinson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for January 10th,...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Emily Dickinson, born in 1830, was the granddaughter of the founder of Amherst College. Except for a few journeys when she was young, Emily lived the life of a recluse in her father's house, spending her days writing poems and letters. In 1862, she sent a few of her poems to a publisher. He replied that her work was too unusual, too different. This was her first and last attempt to reach the public ear. From then on, she bound her work in small hand-stitched collections that she kept in her bureau drawer. After Emily's death in 1885, her sister discovered over a thousand poems hidden away in drawers and boxes. Although Emily's experiences were limited, her poems are profound, often playful,...read more

  • William Blake

    Animal Poems. We all love animals, even if sometimes its only from afar on TV or at a zoo. But many of us have felt friendship and companionship with our friends in the animal world. We talk and react to them as if they really do understand us. Perhaps they do. In this volume Hardy, Thackeray, Carroll, DH Lawrence, Emily Dickinson and many others share their words with our...read more

  • William Wordsworth

    Autumn - An Introduction. For many of us Autumn, or as the Americans would say; Fall is the season of mixed emotions. Summer's long days are replaced by a chill in the air. The colours on the trees and fields ripen to warmer hues and the harvest is brought safely home. Yet with this bounty there is the knowledge that Nature is turning her attention to the harder, colder Winter month's ahead. Our collection of poems amplifies this balance between the loss of summer and the gain of the harvest with wonderful poems by such notables as Shelley, Yeats, Keats, Sheehan, Emily Dickinson and Longfellow. This collection is read for you by Ghizela Rowe and Gideon Wagner. We hope you've enjoyed...read more

  • William Wordsworth

    Christmas Poetry. An Introduction. Christmas, they say, comes but once a year. In these days it seems to also last for much of that year but this volume is not just for Christmas! For the religious amongst us this annual celebration of the Birth of Christ must seem bitter sweet; it's acknowledgment by billions of people countered by the pervasive spread of material possessions translating the event to little more than a sales pitch for their own wares. Most religions celebrate their founders but Christianity seems somehow to have lost possession of one of its key rituals in an ever more secular West. The spread of globalisation seems to have hindered rather than helped the true...read more

  • Rudyard Kipling

    Spring - An Introduction. Spring by tradition begins the renewal both of ourselves and of nature. The very sound of the word suggests impetus and movement and people do seem taken with the notion that the year's journey is about to begin. The days become longer, warmer and the fresh green of new growth begins to show itself. All manner of life start to busy themselves with activities and plans. In this collection of poetry Wordsworth, Browning, Kipling & Yeats are familiar voices to which Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Daniel Sheehan, Amy Lowell and Christina Rossetti and others bring their words of insight, charm and emotion. It's a rich and rewarding combination. This collection is...read more

  • Emily Dickinson

    Summer - An Introduction. Summer beckons each and every one of us to its warm embrace. For many of us it is the season we can most enjoy; the days are long and warm and all manner of things become easier. Nature shows us her most colourful side as she fills the landscape with colours and textures of every hue. As for ourselves we all seem a little more approachable, a little more likable. For poets the Summer season conjures up many themes and images. Keats, Blake, Dickinson, Tennyson, Longfellow, take us through many of these facets ably joined by Meynell, Pope, Van Dyke, Stevenson and many others. This volume is poured from the mouths of Ghizela Rowe and Richard...read more

  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

    January - the first month of the year in the Gregorian calendar ushers in the New Year. The cold and bleak landscape of winter however provides a rich background for our esteemed poets such as Byron, Longfellow, Cowper and Bronte to offer us their reflections and counterpoints. Among our readers are Richard Mitchley and Ghizela Rowe. The tracks are; January - An Introduction; January 1 1828 By Nathaniel Parker Willis; Written January The 1st, 1792 By Janet Little; Written January 1st 1832 By Henry Alford; Promises That Fail Their Makers Lips By Daniel Sheehan; The Old Year By John Clare; At The Entering Of The New Year By Thomas Hardy; Written During An Aurora Borealis January 7th...read more