Searching for: "Euripides"

  • Euripides

    Electra (the Unmated One) is eaten up with hatred of her mother Clytemnestra and stepfather Aegisthus for their murder of her father Agamemnon. Married platonically to a good-hearted but poverty-stricken old peasant, she longs for the return of her brother Orestes to help her wreak vengeance. Orestes finally returns and together they carry out their fated work, but find the result to be as tragically meaningless as the lust for vengeance had been poisonous. Strikingly different from Sophocles, who wrote his “Electra” with full sympathy for the divine ordinance of revenge, Euripides squarely blames the God Apollo for putting an evil commandment on the shoulders of the siblings. He also...read more

  • Euripide

    Euripide est un des trois grands tragiques de l'Athènes classique, avec Eschyle et Sophocle. Certains auteurs antiques lui attribuent 95 pièces dont 18 conservées dans leur intégralité. Il reste d'Euripide plus de pièces que d'Eschyle et Sophocle réunis, parce que sa popularité augmentait tandis que la leur déclinait. Il connut un immense succès durant l'époque hellénistique. Connu parmi les écrivains de l'Athènes classique pour sa sympathie sans égale envers toutes les victimes de la société, femmes incluses, ses contemporains l'ont associé à Socrate, et en ont fait le porte-parole d'un intellectualisme décadent. Les deux personnages se trouvent fréquemment raillés...read more

  • Euripides

    Like Euripides' Trojan Women, this play takes place after the sack of Troy. Hecuba, widow of King Priam, suffers the loss of her daughter Polyxena and her son Polydore, and is hungry for revenge on those who have wronged her. Summary by Elizabeth...read more

  • Euripides

    Iphigenie in Aulis übersetzt aus dem Euripides von Friedrich von Schiller. Die Gesinnungen in diesem Stücke sind groß und edel, die Handlung wichtig und erhaben, die Mittel dazu glücklich gewählt und geordnet. (aus den Anmerkungen von...read more

  • Euripides

    Euripides' play follows the fates of the women of Troy after their city has been sacked, their husbands killed, and as their remaining families are about to be taken away as slaves. However, it begins first with the gods Athena and Poseidon discussing ways to punish the Greek armies because they condoned Ajax the Lesser for dragging Cassandra away from Athena's temple. What follows shows how much the Trojan women have suffered as their grief is compounded when the Greeks dole out additional deaths and divide their shares of women. This translation by Gilbert Murray was published in 1915. (Summary by Wikipedia and Elizabeth...read more

  • Euripides

    In accordance with the advice of the god Apollo, Orestes has killed his mother Clytemnestra to avenge the death of his father Agamemnon at her hands. Despite Apollo’s earlier prophecy, Orestes finds himself tormented by Erinyes or Furies to the blood guilt stemming from his matricide. The only person capable of calming Orestes down from his madness is his sister Electra. To complicate matters further, a leading political faction of Argos wants to put Orestes to death for the murder. Orestes’ only hope to save his life lies in his uncle Menelaus, who has returned with Helen after spending ten years in Troy and several more years amassing wealth in Egypt. In the chronology of events...read more

  • Euripides

    The apparent sacrifice of Iphigenia at Aulis by her own father Agamemnon was forestalled by the godness Artemis, who by an adroit sleight of hand that fooled all participants, substituted a deer for the daughter. Wafted magically away to the “Friendless Shores” of savage Tauris and installed as chief priestess presiding over the human sacrifice of all luckless foreigners, Iphigenia broods over her “murder” by her parents and longs for some Greeks to be shipwrecked on her shores so she can wreak a vicarious vengeance on them. Little does she expect her own little brother Orestes to be one of those Greeks brought to her altar. Possibly the most beautiful of the plays of Euripides,...read more

  • Euripides

    Euripides' tragedy focuses on the disintegration of the relationship between Jason, the hero who captured the Golden Fleece, and Medea, the sorceress who returned with him to Corinth and had two sons with him. As the play opens, Jason plans to marry the daughter of King Creon, and the lovesick Medea plots how to take her revenge. (Summary by Elizabeth...read more

  • Euripides

    Medea is an ancient Greek tragedy written by Euripides, based upon the myth of Jason and Medea and first produced in 431 BCE. The plot centers on the actions of Medea, a barbarian and the wife of Jason; she finds her position in the Greek world threatened as Jason leaves her for a Greek princess of Corinth. Medea takes vengeance on Jason by killing Jason's new wife as well as her own children with him, after which she escapes to Athens to start a new life. Considered shocking to the playwright's contemporaries, Medea and the suite of plays that it accompanied in the City Dionysia festival came last in the festival that year. Nonetheless the play remained part of the tragedic repertoire,...read more

  • Platon

    La pensée antique est au fondement de l'histoire des idées et de la philosophie occidentale. Découvrez-en toute la profondeur en 700 citations soigneusement choisies pour présenter sous forme condensée les enseignements majeurs des sept figures incontournables de la philosophie antique, entre la Grèce et Rome qui s'en nourrit. Homme d'Etat et conseiller impérial, Sénèque expose une conception stoïcienne fondée sur la vertu et le détachement. Euripide est un des trois grands auteurs tragiques de l'Athènes classique, avec Eschyle et Sophocle, et connut un immense succès auprès de ses contemporains qui le rangeaient aux côtés de Socrate. Dernier des "Cinq bons empereurs" de...read more

  • Platon

    La pensée antique est au fondement de l'histoire des idées et de la philosophie occidentale. Fondamentalement pratique et axée sur le quotidien, elle est marquée par le stoïcisme et la recherche de la sagesse sous toutes ses formes. Découvrez-en toute la profondeur en 400 citations soigneusement choisies pour présenter sous forme condensée les enseignements majeurs des figures incontournables de la Grèce antique. Platon met en scène le geste primordial de l'interrogation de soi, pour se débarrasser des préjugés et de l'illusion ; son élève Aristote est l'un des penseurs les plus influents que le monde ait connus, et il dirigea la philosophie comme une recherche du savoir pour...read more

  • Euripides

    Medea is an ancient Greek tragedy written by Euripides, based upon the myth of Jason and Medea and first produced in 431 BC. The plot centers on the actions of Medea, a former princess of the 'barbarian' kingdom of Colchis, and the wife of Jason; she finds her position in the Greek world threatened as Jason leaves her for a Greek princess of Corinth. Medea takes vengeance on Jason by murdering Jason's new wife as well as her own children, after which she escapes to Athens to start a new...read more

  • Euripides

    Medea es una obra teatral en la que el personaje principal, Medea, mata a sus hijos para vengarse de su esposo, quien la ha dejado por otra mujer. A pesar de lo terrible de este acto, se ha identificado a este personaje con la mujer engañada. El análisis de ésta obra ha generado muchas controversias. Esta es la obra más famosa de...read more

  • Euripides

    Orestes, coming into Tauri in Scythia, in company with Pylades, had been commanded to bear away the image of Diana, after which he was to meet with a respite from the avenging Erinnyes of his mother. His sister Iphigenia, who had been carried away by Diana from Aulis, when on the point of being sacrificed by her father, chances to be expiating a dream that led her to suppose Orestes dead, when a herdsman announces to her the arrival and detection of two strangers, whom she is bound by her office to sacrifice to Diana. On meeting, a mutual discovery takes place, and they plot their escape. - Summary by Theodore...read more

  • Euripides

    The tragedy is based on the mythological story of King Pentheus of Thebes and his mother Agavë, and their punishment by the god Dionysus (who is Pentheus' cousin) for refusing to worship him. (Summary by...read more

  • Euripides

    Pohl takes us into the future in this quirky and funny story, where the population of the United States is less than 10,000 people ... total. Yes you guessed it, there was a war; but the 'clean' bombs killed people and left most everything else intact. Our trio of 'Knights' are not very talented or smart or brave, but they have survived very well and now are taking on New York City to fulfill a quest of Arthur. You see, Arthur has no legs. Or arms. Or body. But he is very opinionated nevertheless. Listen to this fascinating story that is full of humor and human nature as only Pohl can do it. (Summary by Phil...read more

  • Euripides

    Iphigenia in Aulis is the last extant work of the playwright Euripides. The Greek fleet is waiting at Aulis, Boeotia, with its ships ready to sail for Troy, but it is unable to depart due to a strange lack of wind. After consulting the seer Calchas, the Greek leaders learn that this is no mere meteorological abnormality but rather the will of the goddess Artemis, who is withholding the winds because Agamemnon has caused her offense. Calchas informs the general that in order to appease the goddess, he must sacrifice his eldest daughter, Iphigenia. Agamemnon, in spite of his horror, must consider this seriously because his assembled troops, who have been waiting on the beach and are...read more

  • Euripides

    Eurpides' tragedy tells of Theseus' chaste son Hippolytus, who refuses to worship Aphrodite in favor of Artemis. Aphrodite gets revenge by causing Hippolytus' stepmother Phaedra to fall in love with him, unleashing a chain of tragic events. (Summary by Elizabeth...read more