Searching for: "Fyodor Dostoyevsky"

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The Gambler is a short novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky about a young tutor in the employment of a formerly wealthy Russian general. The novella reflects Dostoevsky's own addiction to roulette, which was in more ways than one the inspiration for the book: Dostoevsky completed the novella under a strict deadline so he could pay off gambling...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    This is the novel that ensured Fyodor Dostoevsky's place as a giant of Russian literature. First published in 1866, this legendary work continues to enthrall readers around the world and earn Dostoevsky legions of fans with every printing. Timeless, and breathtaking in scope, Crime and Punishment-the story of a young Russian intellectual's decision to murder a cruel pawnbroker and his subsequent intellectual and spiritual crisis-is one of the most famous novels in all of literature. This absorbing book attacks the overly logical nihilistic ideals of reason and science and proves that only through love, self-denial and suffering comes salvation. George Guidall's fluent interpretation of the...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The Brothers Karamazov (Russian: ?????? ??????????) is the final novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky, and is generally considered the culmination of his life's work. The book portrays a parricide in which each of a murdered man's sons share a varying degree of complicity. The Brothers Karamazov is a passionate philosophical novel that explores deep into the ethical debates of God, free will, and morality. It is a spiritual drama of moral struggles concerning faith, doubt, reason, and modern Russia. Since its publication, it has been acclaimed all over the world by thinkers as diverse as Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein, and Pope Benedict XVI as one of the supreme achievements in...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Notes from Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky is a sophisticated novell with extremely hard to comprehend philosophical ideas lying on the border of paranoia, orthodoxal believing of God and psychological researches on human nature. Every sentence sounds like a sort of revelation to an unprepared reader's mind and causes a deep flashback thoughts which are impossible to get rid of, which also require an immediate solution. Though it's hard to define precisely what kind of content presented in novell but one can say it is a sort of impossible mixture of traditional Dostoevsky's ideas of loneliness, ideas of internal human confilct, ideas of freedom and interhuman relationship. Reader keeps...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Belye Nochi ”White Nights” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. In this small 100kb story (though author states this is a sentimental novel) author describes in his traditional and particular way the internal world of one young lonely person. The hero’s 26 years old man, who is oriented into his internal world, who’s rather shy, and thus is in real demand of a soulful conversations and love. The action take place in the city of a real and deep sentiments and romance — Saint Petersburg, the most romantic and european city in Russia. Not only the location is important, but also a time of a day: all actions in the story take place in evening and night time — the famous time of white...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Notes from Underground is an 1864 novella by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. Notes is considered by many to be the first existentialist novel. It presents itself as an excerpt from the rambling memoirs of a bitter, isolated, unnamed narrator (generally referred to by critics as the Underground Man) who is a retired civil servant living in St. Petersburg. The first part of the story is told in monologue form, or the underground man's diary, and attacks emerging Western philosophy, especially Nikolay Chernyshevsky's What Is to Be Done?. The second part of the book is called "Àpropos of the Wet Snow," and describes certain events that, it seems, are destroying and sometimes renewing the underground man,...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The Possessed, also called Demons, is Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel about life in Russia at the end of the 19th century. In this highly political novel, Dostoevsky portrays the revolutionaries as demons or devils as they plot ruin and eventually turn on each...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The Grand Inquisitor is a parable told by Ivan to Alyosha in Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel The Brothers Karamazov (1879-1880). Ivan and Alyosha are brothers; Ivan questions the possibility of a personal, benevolent God and Alyosha is a novice monk. The Grand Inquisitor is an important part of the novel and one of the best-known passages in modern literature because of its ideas about human nature and freedom, and because of its fundamental ambiguity. In the tale, Christ comes back to earth in Seville at the time of the Inquisition. He performs a number of miracles (echoing miracles from the Gospels). The people recognize him and adore him, but he is arrested by Inquisition leaders and...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    'I am a sick man...I am a spiteful man,' a nameless voice cries out. And so, from underground, emerge the passionate confessions of a suffering man; the painful self-examination of a tormented soul; the bristling scorn of a lonely individual who has become one of the greatest anti-heroes in all literature. Notes from Underground reveals Fyodor Dostoevsky on the threshold of genius, discovering the ideas that would later lead him to create his most monumental novels: Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, and The Brothers Karamazov. Those who are familiar with his works will immediately recognize the novel's richly complex philosophical, political, and psychological themes; those who are not will...read more

  • Jack London

    This audio book contains the following short stories: 1) To Build a Fire (Jack London) 2) In the Penal Colony (Franz Kafka) 3) White Nights (Fyodor Dostoyevsky) 4) The Chimes (Charles Dickens) 5) What Men Live By (Leo Tolstoy) 6) To Build a Fire (Jack...read more

  • Robert Louis Stevenson

    This Audiobook contains the following works: - The Island of Doctor Moreau [H.G. wells] - Tess of the d'Urbervilles [Thomas Hardy] - The Call of Cthulhu [H.P Lovecraft] - A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court [Mark twain] - The strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde [Robert Louis Stevenson] - Crime and Punishment [Fyodor Dostoyevsky] - Wuthering Heights [Emily Brontë] - A Christmas Carol [Charles Dickens] - The jungle book [Rudyard Kipling] - The Border Legion [Zane...read more

  • Robert Louis Stevenson

    This Audiobook contains the following works: - White Fang [Jack London ] - Tess of the d'Urbervilles [Thomas Hardy] - The Call of Cthulhu [H.P Lovecraft] - A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court [Mark twain] - The Return of Sherlock Holmes [Arthur Conan Doyle] - The strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde [Robert Louis Stevenson] - Crime and Punishment [Fyodor Dostoyevsky] - Wuthering Heights [Emily Brontë] - A Christmas Carol [Charles Dickens] - The jungle book [Rudyard Kipling] Also Available 10 Masterpieces you have to listen before you die Vol: 1 (Golden Deer Classics) 10 Masterpieces you have to listen before you die Vol: 2 (Golden Deer...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    In this dark and compelling short novel, Fyodor Dostoevsky tells the story of Alexey Ivanovitch, a young tutor working in the household of an imperious Russian general. Alexey tries to break through the wall of the established order in Russia, but instead becomes mired in the endless downward spiral of betting and loss. His intense and inescapable addiction is accentuated by his affair with the General's cruel yet seductively adept niece, Polina. In The Gambler, Dostoevsky reaches the heights of drama with this stunning psychological...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Although titled The Possessed in the initial English translation, Dostoyevsky scholars and later translations favour the titles The Devils or Demons. An extremely political book, Demons is a testimonial of life in Imperial Russia in the late 19th century. As the revolutionary democrats begin to rise in Russia, different ideologies begin to collide. Dostoyevsky casts a critical eye on both the radical idealists, portraying their ideas and ideological foundation as demonic, and the conservative establishment's ineptitude in dealing with those ideas and their social consequences. This form of intellectual conservativism tied to the Slavophile movement of Dostoyevsky's day, called...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Although titled The Possessed in the initial English translation, Dostoyevsky scholars and later translations favour the titles The Devils or Demons. An extremely political book, Demons is a testimonial of life in Imperial Russia in the late 19th century. As the revolutionary democrats begin to rise in Russia, different ideologies begin to collide. Dostoyevsky casts a critical eye on both the radical idealists, portraying their ideas and ideological foundation as demonic, and the conservative establishment's ineptitude in dealing with those ideas and their social consequences. This form of intellectual conservativism tied to the Slavophile movement of Dostoyevsky's day, called...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Considered one of the first existentialist novels, Notes from Underground contains one of the most unsettling characters in 19th-century fiction. Resentful, cruel, entitled and pitiful, Dostoyevsky's Underground Man is a disturbing human being bent on humiliating others for his own amusement. He despises modern society and stews in a self-imposed misery, articulated through his bitter, contradictory monologues about torment and alienation. The Gambler is perhaps the most personal of Dostoyevsky's novels. Written to pay off the author's own gambling debts, the book follows the obsessions and anxieties of Alexey Ivanovitch, a sympathetic character who has given in to the forces of addiction....read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The final masterpiece from the celebrated author of 'Crime and Punishment' and 'The Idiot.'.. This extraordinary novel, Dostoyevsky s last and greatest work, tells the dramatic story of four brothers Dmitri, pleasure-seeking, impatient, unruly . . . Ivan, brilliant and morose . . . Alyosha, gentle, loving, honest . . . and the illegitimate Smerdyakov, sly, silent, cruel. Driven by intense passion, they become involved in the brutal murder of their own father, one of the most loathsome characters in all literature. Featuring the famous chapter, The Grand Inquisitor, Dostoyevsky's final masterpiece is at once a complex character study, a riveting murder mystery, and a fascinating...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Dostoyevsky’s titanic masterpiece The Brothers Karamazov is here adapted into a spellbinding full-cast drama by playwright David Fishelson. The passionate Karamazov brothers spring to life, led by their rogue of a father, who entertains himself by drinking, womanizing, and pitting his three sons against each other. The men have plenty to fight over, including the alluring Grushenka. An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring John de Lancie, Sharon Gless, Arye Gross, Harry Hamlin, Kaitlin Hopkins, Joseph Mascolo, Richard Hoyt Miller, John Randolph, John Rubinstein, Tom Virtue, Ping...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Dostoyevsky’s titanic novels are transformed into spellbinding drama. The passionate Karamazov brothers spring to life, led by their rogue of a father, who entertains himself by drinking, womanizing, and pitting his three sons against each other. In The Idiot, meet the childlike Prince Myshkin, as he returns to the decadent social whirl of St. Petersburg. The two most beautiful women in town compete for his affections, in a duel that grows increasingly dangerous. Two L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performances. The Brothers Karamazov: John de Lancie, Sharon Gless, Arye Gross, Harry Hamlin, Kaitlin Hopkins, Joseph Mascolo, Richard Hoyt Miller, John Randolph, John Rubinstein, Tom Virtue...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Cousin Betty (La Cousine Bette), published in serial format in 1846, was one of the last and greatest of Balzac's works. It was part of his long novel collection titled La Comédie Humaine. Set in mid-19th-century France, it tells the story of a woman who resents her position as a "poor relation." As we follow her schemes to bring ruin upon the more privileged members of her family, we see a society in transition. The stability and idealism of the old order give way to a new bourgeois world in which virtue is strangled in the struggle for power and money. In this novel, Balzac searchingly probes the psychology and motivations of his characters: his work influenced the development of...read more