Searching for: "Fyodor Dostoyevsky"

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    One of the most influential authors from Russia's Golden Age, Fyodor Dostoevsky left behind a vast collection of prized literary works, including Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov. In The Idiot, Prince Myshkin possesses a childlike innocence and trusting nature that leaves him vulnerable to abuse by those around him. Returning to St. Petersburg to collect an inheritance, Myshkin realizes he is a stranger in a society obsessed with wealth, manipulation and power. Alan Myers translated this...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky, including the classic Crime and Punishment, secured the great Russian writer an exalted position in the literary pantheon of 20th-century authors. The Gambler stands as one of the literary genius' most highly regarded shorter works. At the casino in Roulettenburg, Germany, a Russian family awaits word that a wealthy relative from Petersburg has died. But to their dismay, Granny arrives and begins gambling away their inheritance at an alarming...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Although titled The Possessed in the initial English translation, Dostoyevsky scholars and later translations favour the titles The Devils or Demons. An extremely political book, Demons is a testimonial of life in Imperial Russia in the late 19th century. As the revolutionary democrats begin to rise in Russia, different ideologies begin to collide. Dostoyevsky casts a critical eye on both the radical idealists, portraying their ideas and ideological foundation as demonic, and the conservative establishment's ineptitude in dealing with those ideas and their social consequences. This form of intellectual conservativism tied to the Slavophile movement of Dostoyevsky's day, called...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Esta es la historia de un parricidio y de cuatro hijos que tenian, cada uno, un motivo para el asesinato: Dmitry el sensual; Ivan el intelectual; Alyosha, el mistico; y el torcido y astuto Smerdyakov. La novela sumerge al lector en un triangulo de amor sordido, una obsesion patologica, y un drama de sala de...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Dostoyevsky’s titanic masterpiece The Brothers Karamazov is here adapted into a spellbinding full-cast drama by playwright David Fishelson. The passionate Karamazov brothers spring to life, led by their rogue of a father, who entertains himself by drinking, womanizing, and pitting his three sons against each other. The men have plenty to fight over, including the alluring Grushenka. An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring John de Lancie, Sharon Gless, Arye Gross, Harry Hamlin, Kaitlin Hopkins, Joseph Mascolo, Richard Hoyt Miller, John Randolph, John Rubinstein, Tom Virtue, Ping...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Exiled to four years in Siberia, but hailed by the end of his life as a saint, prophet, and genius, Fyodor Dostoevsky holds an exalted place among the best of the great Russian authors. One of Dostoevsky's five major novels, Devils follows the travails of a small provincial town beset by a band of modish radicals - and in so doing presents a devastating depiction of life and politics in late 19th-century Imperial Russia. Both a grotesque comedy and a shocking illustration of clashing ideologies, Dostoevsky's famed novel stands as an undeniable...read more

  • Fyodor Mikhail Dostoyevsky

    Dostoyevsky's famous and well-regarded 1880 novel The Brothers Karamazov is a tale of bitter family rivalries. Three brothers live in a small, typical Russian town. Their father, a selfish, cunning, lascivious figure with little love for them, tries to maintain his control over them and anyone who comes within his orbit. The roots of dissent, unhappiness, hope, ambition and desire run deep in this community as everywhere, and Dostoyevsky brings them to the fore with an unexpected death. The atmospheric spell of this great work of Russian literature is maintained throughout by a masterly reading by Tim...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Raskolnikov, a destitute and desperate former student, wanders through the slums of St Petersburg and commits a random murder without remorse or regret. He imagines himself to be a great man, a Napoleon: acting for a higher purpose beyond conventional moral law. But as he embarks on a dangerous game of cat and mouse with a suspicious police investigator, Raskolnikov is pursued by the growing voice of his conscience and finds the noose of his own guilt tightening around his neck. Only Sonya, a downtrodden prostitute, can offer the chance of...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    This is the novel that ensured Fyodor Dostoevsky's place as a giant of Russian literature. First published in 1866, this legendary work continues to enthrall readers around the world and earn Dostoevsky legions of fans with every printing. Timeless, and breathtaking in scope, Crime and Punishment-the story of a young Russian intellectual's decision to murder a cruel pawnbroker and his subsequent intellectual and spiritual crisis-is one of the most famous novels in all of literature. This absorbing book attacks the overly logical nihilistic ideals of reason and science and proves that only through love, self-denial and suffering comes salvation. George Guidall's fluent interpretation of the...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Fyodor Dostoyevsky's short masterpiece about a ranting, slightly mad civil servant. The stylistic inventiveness, and the insights into the absurdities and weakness of humans seem so fresh and incisive today that if published now (a century and a half later) Notes would be considered an avant-garde post-modernist triumph. In some ways this is a heavy text, laden with conversational philosophizing; but the vividness of the narrator make it a wonderful read, and funny. (Review by Hugh...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    A century after it first appeared, Crime and Punishment remains one of the most gripping psychological thrillers. A poverty-striken young man, seeing his family making sacrifices for him, is faced with an opportunity to solve his financial problems with one simple but horrifying act: the murder of a pawnbroker. She is, he feels, just a parasite on society. But does the end justify the means? Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov makes his decision and then has to live with it. Dostoyevsky, in masterly fashion, contrasts the comedy and tragedy of life in St Petersburg with the anguish and turmoil of Raskolnikov's inner...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    White Nights and Other Stories by Fyodor Dostoyevsky is a compilation published in 1918 by The MacMillan Company, NY (USA) and Heinemann (UK). It contains these 7 works: - White Nights - Notes from the Underground - A Faint Heart - A Christmas Tree and a Wedding - Polzunkov - A Little Hero - Mr....read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Notes from Underground is an 1864 novella by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. Notes is considered by many to be the first existentialist novel. It presents itself as an excerpt from the rambling memoirs of a bitter, isolated, unnamed narrator (generally referred to by critics as the Underground Man) who is a retired civil servant living in St. Petersburg. The first part of the story is told in monologue form, or the underground man's diary, and attacks emerging Western philosophy, especially Nikolay Chernyshevsky's What Is to Be Done?. The second part of the book is called "Àpropos of the Wet Snow," and describes certain events that, it seems, are destroying and sometimes renewing the underground man,...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Crime and Punishment focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov, an impoverished St. Petersburg student who formulates and executes a plan to kill a hated, unscrupulous pawnbroker for her money, thereby solving his financial problems and at the same time, he argues, ridding the world of evil. Crime and Punishment is considered by many as the first of Dostoevsky's cycle of great novels, which would culminate with his last completed work, The Brothers Karamazov, shortly before his...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The extraordinary child-adult Prince Myshkin, confined for several years in a Swiss sanatorium suffering from severe epilepsy, returns to Russia to claim his inheritance and to find a place in healthy human society. The teeming St Petersburg community he enters is far from receptive to an innocent like himself, despite some early successes and relentless pursuit by grotesque fortune-hunters. His naive gaucheries give rise to extreme reactions among his new acquaintance, ranging from anguished protectiveness to mockery and contempt. But even before reaching the city, during the memorable train journey that opens the novel, he has encountered the demonic Rogozhin, the son of a wealthy...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    "Crime and Punishment" is a novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky. It was first published in the literary journal "The Russian Messenger" in twelve monthly installments during 1866. It was later published in a single volume. It is the second of Dostoyevsky's full-length novels following his return from ten years of exile in Siberia. Crime and Punishment is considered the first great novel of his "mature" period of writing. "Crime and Punishment" focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Raskolnikov, an impoverished ex-student in St. Petersburg who formulates and executes a plan to kill an unscrupulous pawnbroker for her cash. Raskolnikov argues that with the...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Dostoyevsky’s titanic novels are transformed into spellbinding drama. The passionate Karamazov brothers spring to life, led by their rogue of a father, who entertains himself by drinking, womanizing, and pitting his three sons against each other. In The Idiot, meet the childlike Prince Myshkin, as he returns to the decadent social whirl of St. Petersburg. The two most beautiful women in town compete for his affections, in a duel that grows increasingly dangerous. Two L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performances. The Brothers Karamazov: John de Lancie, Sharon Gless, Arye Gross, Harry Hamlin, Kaitlin Hopkins, Joseph Mascolo, Richard Hoyt Miller, John Randolph, John Rubinstein, Tom Virtue...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Originally published in serial form in 1879-80, ÒThe Brothers KaramazovÓ is recognized as one of the very greatest masterpieces of world literature. It is the last and finest novel of Fyodor Dostoyevsky, who died before writing a planned sequel. The story is organized initially around the efforts of adult sons to deal with their cantankerous and exasperating father. More important, they also have to deal with the problem of how to live in a world where it is difficult to be sure of the truth Ñ whether that be ÒtruthÓ about others, about oneself, or about deep questions such as faith, doubt, free will, guilt, and responsibility. DostoyevskyÕs technique underlines the difficulty of...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The Brothers Karamazov (Russian: ?????? ??????????) is the final novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky, and is generally considered the culmination of his life's work. The book portrays a parricide in which each of a murdered man's sons share a varying degree of complicity. The Brothers Karamazov is a passionate philosophical novel that explores deep into the ethical debates of God, free will, and morality. It is a spiritual drama of moral struggles concerning faith, doubt, reason, and modern Russia. Since its publication, it has been acclaimed all over the world by thinkers as diverse as Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein, and Pope Benedict XVI as one of the supreme achievements in...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    First published in 1846, Fyodor Dostoyevsky's novella The Double is a classic doppelganger and the second major work published by the author. It is the story of Yakov Petrovich Golyadkin, a government clerk who believes that a fellow clerk has taken over his identity and is determined to bring about his ruin. Considered the most Gogolesque of Dostoyevsky's works, the novella brilliantly depicts Golyadkin's descent into madness in a way that is hauntingly poetic. The Double illustrates Dostoyevsky's uncanny ability at capturing the complexity of human emotion, especially the darker side of the human...read more