Searching for: "Fyodor Dostoyevsky"

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    A Faint Heart is a testament to the author's brilliant sense of style and subtle sense of psychology. Two men have a passionate and loving relationship but are not homosexuals. The narrative is about a young clerk who can not reconcile his own personal happiness at marrying a lovely young woman while the rest of the world is not equally as happy. He winds up institutionalized and his beloved marries another, but falls to the ground weeping when meeting his dear friend two years later. A unique story, unlike any other we know of in the literary...read more

  • William Shakespeare

    It's the most wonderful time of the year! The happiest season of them all. This volume offers selected sorties dedicated to Christmas and winter seasons from some of the best storytellers such as Fyodor Dostoyevsky, William Shakespeare, L. Frank Baum, Anton Chekhov. There'll be tales of the glories of Christmases long, long ago. And hearts will be glowing. The collection opens with 'The Heavenly Christmas Tree' by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, followed by 'At Christmas Time' from Anton Chekhov. In the second part we have 'A Kidnapped Santa Claus' by L. Frank Baum, followed by 'The Winter's Tale' from William...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    First published in 1846, Fyodor Dostoyevsky's novella The Double is a classic doppelganger and the second major work published by the author. It is the story of Yakov Petrovich Golyadkin, a government clerk who believes that a fellow clerk has taken over his identity and is determined to bring about his ruin. Considered the most Gogolesque of Dostoyevsky's works, the novella brilliantly depicts Golyadkin's descent into madness in a way that is hauntingly poetic. The Double illustrates Dostoyevsky's uncanny ability at capturing the complexity of human emotion, especially the darker side of the human...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881) is recognised as one of the greats of Russian literature. Soon after his 1843 graduation from the School of Engineering in St. Petersburg, the young Dostoyevsky abandoned his career to devote himself to literature. He quickly became a popular, recognised author, but in the unstable political environment of the time, he was accused of conspiracy, and in 1849 he was sentenced to ten years' hard labour in Siberia. On his return from prison, he recommenced writing, this time with a new poignancy, depth of psychological insight, and vibrant character study, all drawn from his Siberian experience. "The Christmas Tree and the Wedding" is an excellent example of...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    The House of the Dead is a novel published in 1861 by Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky, which portrays the life of convicts in a Siberian prison camp. Dostoyevsky himself spent four years in exile in such a camp following his conviction for involvement in the Petrashevsky Circle. This experience allowed him to describe with great authenticity the conditions of prison life and the characters of the convicts. The narrator, Aleksandr Petrovich Goryanchikov, has been sentenced to penalty deportation to Siberia and ten years of hard labour. Life in prison is particularly hard for Aleksandr Petrovich, since he is a 'gentleman' and suffers the malice of the other prisoners, nearly all of whom...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Brought to you by Penguin. The murder of brutal landowner Fyodor Karamazov changes the lives of his sons irrevocably: Mitya, the sensualist, whose bitter rivalry with his father immediately places him under suspicion for parricide; Ivan, the intellectual, driven to breakdown; the spiritual Alyosha, who tries to heal the family's rifts; and the shadowy figure of their bastard half-brother, Smerdyakov. Dostoyevsky's dark masterwork evokes a world where the lines between innocence and corruption, good and evil, blur, and everyone's faith in humanity is tested. Translated with an Introduction and notes by DAVID McDUFF 'The most magnificent novel ever written' Sigmund Freud © David...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1822-1881) was Russia's greatest mystic who wrote of the contest between the rebellious uncertain human and the mystery of divine omnipresence which is revealed to the enlightened in the midst of life's bitterest wrongs and suffering. His work is defined by a pity and compassion that shines from all his writing. The Honest Thiefis one of Dostoyevsky's tale's of pity, in which he reveals that compassionate sympathy of the Russian mind for all suffering, the pure and noble conscience awakened in the spirit of a fallen man. The central relationship - between the poor peasant and the even poorer old alcoholic tramp who he has taken into his home - is beautifully described...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Uncle's Dream by Fyodor Dostoyevsky was written following his five year exile to Siberia where he was sent to serve in a hard labor camp. Following what could only have been a harrowing and harsh existence in Russia's infamous prison for political and social prisoners, one would expect Dostoyevsky's work to have been dark and bitter. Rather, Uncle's Dream is a humorous and yet scathing commentary on Russian provincial high-society. The story of elderly Prince K. who comes to visit the town of Mordasoff, lorded over by the imperious Maria Alexandrovna, is one of love, hate, deceit and greed. Standing reluctantly at Maria Alexandrovna's side is her haughty daughter, Zina, who has few friends...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Although titled The Possessed in the initial English translation, Dostoyevsky scholars and later translations favour the titles The Devils or Demons. An extremely political book, Demons is a testimonial of life in Imperial Russia in the late 19th century. As the revolutionary democrats begin to rise in Russia, different ideologies begin to collide. Dostoyevsky casts a critical eye on both the radical idealists, portraying their ideas and ideological foundation as demonic, and the conservative establishment's ineptitude in dealing with those ideas and their social consequences. This form of intellectual conservativism tied to the Slavophile movement of Dostoyevsky's day, called...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Although titled The Possessed in the initial English translation, Dostoyevsky scholars and later translations favour the titles The Devils or Demons. An extremely political book, Demons is a testimonial of life in Imperial Russia in the late 19th century. As the revolutionary democrats begin to rise in Russia, different ideologies begin to collide. Dostoyevsky casts a critical eye on both the radical idealists, portraying their ideas and ideological foundation as demonic, and the conservative establishment's ineptitude in dealing with those ideas and their social consequences. This form of intellectual conservativism tied to the Slavophile movement of Dostoyevsky's day, called...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    White Nights and Other Stories by Fyodor Dostoyevsky is a compilation published in 1918 by The MacMillan Company, NY (USA) and Heinemann (UK). It contains these 7 works: - White Nights - Notes from the Underground - A Faint Heart - A Christmas Tree and a Wedding - Polzunkov - A Little Hero - Mr....read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Fyodor Dostoyevsky's short masterpiece about a ranting, slightly mad civil servant. The stylistic inventiveness, and the insights into the absurdities and weakness of humans seem so fresh and incisive today that if published now (a century and a half later) Notes would be considered an avant-garde post-modernist triumph. In some ways this is a heavy text, laden with conversational philosophizing; but the vividness of the narrator make it a wonderful read, and funny. (Review by Hugh...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    "Crime and Punishment" is a novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky. It was first published in the literary journal "The Russian Messenger" in twelve monthly installments during 1866. It was later published in a single volume. It is the second of Dostoyevsky's full-length novels following his return from ten years of exile in Siberia. Crime and Punishment is considered the first great novel of his "mature" period of writing. "Crime and Punishment" focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Raskolnikov, an impoverished ex-student in St. Petersburg who formulates and executes a plan to kill an unscrupulous pawnbroker for her cash. Raskolnikov argues that with the...read more

  • Jack London

    This audio book contains the following short stories: 1) To Build a Fire (Jack London) 2) In the Penal Colony (Franz Kafka) 3) White Nights (Fyodor Dostoyevsky) 4) The Chimes (Charles Dickens) 5) What Men Live By (Leo Tolstoy) 6) To Build a Fire (Jack...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    'The Dream of a Ridiculous Man' (Russian: ??? ???????? ????????, Son smeshnovo cheloveka) is a short story by Fyodor Dostoyevsky written in 1877. It chronicles the experiences of a man who decides that there is nothing of any value in the world. Slipping into nihilism with the "terrible anguish" he is determined to commit suicide. A chance encounter with a young girl, however, begins the man on a journey that re-instills a love for his fellow...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    Originally published in serial form in 1879-80, ÒThe Brothers KaramazovÓ is recognized as one of the very greatest masterpieces of world literature. It is the last and finest novel of Fyodor Dostoyevsky, who died before writing a planned sequel. The story is organized initially around the efforts of adult sons to deal with their cantankerous and exasperating father. More important, they also have to deal with the problem of how to live in a world where it is difficult to be sure of the truth Ñ whether that be ÒtruthÓ about others, about oneself, or about deep questions such as faith, doubt, free will, guilt, and responsibility. DostoyevskyÕs technique underlines the difficulty of...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    This is a collection of short stories written by Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Dostoevsky), who is arguably better-known for his lengthy, contemplative novels. Several of his trademark philosophical, political and religious themes are interwoven throughout these short stories, for example: "Dream of a Ridiculous Man" critiques European nihilism; "The Crocodile" has notes of Russian political commentary; and "Bobok" is critically acclaimed as top-rate Menippean satire. Dostoevsky also provides a Christmas story ("The Heavenly Christmas Tree") with a biting social...read more

  • Robert Louis Stevenson

    This Audiobook contains the following works: - The Island of Doctor Moreau [H.G. wells] - Tess of the d'Urbervilles [Thomas Hardy] - The Call of Cthulhu [H.P Lovecraft] - A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court [Mark twain] - The strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde [Robert Louis Stevenson] - Crime and Punishment [Fyodor Dostoyevsky] - Wuthering Heights [Emily Brontë] - A Christmas Carol [Charles Dickens] - The jungle book [Rudyard Kipling] - The Border Legion [Zane...read more

  • Robert Louis Stevenson

    This Audiobook contains the following works: - White Fang [Jack London ] - Tess of the d'Urbervilles [Thomas Hardy] - The Call of Cthulhu [H.P Lovecraft] - A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court [Mark twain] - The Return of Sherlock Holmes [Arthur Conan Doyle] - The strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde [Robert Louis Stevenson] - Crime and Punishment [Fyodor Dostoyevsky] - Wuthering Heights [Emily Brontë] - A Christmas Carol [Charles Dickens] - The jungle book [Rudyard Kipling] Also Available 10 Masterpieces you have to listen before you die Vol: 1 (Golden Deer Classics) 10 Masterpieces you have to listen before you die Vol: 2 (Golden Deer...read more

  • Fyodor Dostoyevski

    Notes from the Underground (1864) by Fyodor Dostoyevsky is one of the first existentialist novels. It presents itself as an excerpt from the rambling memoirs of a bitter, isolated, unnamed narrator, who is a retired civil servant living in St. Petersburg. The first part of the story is told in monologue form, or the underground man's diary, and attacks emerging Western philosophy, especially Nikolay Chernyshevsky's What Is to Be Done? The second part of the book is called 'Apropos of the Wet Snow', and describes certain events that, it seems, are destroying and sometimes renewing the underground man, who acts as a first person, unreliable narrator and...read more