Searching for: "George Bernard Shaw"

  • George Bernard Shaw

    Eight of George Bernard Shaw's most memorable plays in one splendid collection: Mrs. Warren’s Profession: Shaw pits a clever heroine against a memorable gallery of rogues in this superbly intelligent and still shocking comedy, which was banned for eight years from the English stage after its London debut. Performed by: Paul Gutrecht, Kaitlin Hopkins,Shirley Knight, Basil Langton, Dakin Matthews and Robin Sachs. Arms and the Man: Stars Anne Heche as the beautiful, headstrong Raina who awaits her fiancé’s return from battle – but instead meets a soldier who seeks asylum in her bedroom. Performed by: Al Espinosa, Jeremy Sisto, Teri Garr, Anne Heche, Micahel Winters, Jason Kravits...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    A star-studded BBC radio production of Bernard Shaw’s Pygmalion – plus bonus drama The ‘B’ Word, telling the story of the play’s scandalous opening night. Irascible phonetics professor Henry Higgins makes a bet with his friend Colonel Pickering that he can train Cockney flower girl Eliza Doolittle to talk ‘like a lady’ and pass as a duchess at the Ambassador’s Ball. As the day of reckoning approaches, can Eliza convince the assembled aristocrats that she’s one of them? And what will become of her afterwards? This effervescent radio version of Shaw’s classic comedy features a stellar cast, including award-winning comedians Alistair McGowan as Henry Higgins, Morgana...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    'Life isn't about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself.' 'We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.' 'Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything' George Bernard Shaw George Bernard Shaw was an Irish playwright, critic, polemicist and political activist. His influence on Western theatre, culture and politics extended from the 1880s to his death and beyond. He wrote more than sixty plays, including major works such as Man and Superman. With a range incorporating both contemporary satire and historical allegory, Shaw became the leading dramatist of his generation. Since his death he...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    George Bernard Shaw was an Irish playwright, critic, polemicist and political activist. His influence on Western theatre, culture and politics extended from the 1880s to his death and beyond. He wrote more than sixty plays, including major works such as Man and Superman. With a range incorporating both contemporary satire and historical allegory, Shaw became the leading dramatist of his generation. Since his death he has regularly been rated as second only to Shakespeare among British dramatists. Here in this exciting audiobook experience you will find the very best of George Bernard Shaw's vibrant personality and inspirational words. A rare audiobook adventure! Contents GEOFFREY GIULIANO...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    Saint Joan is a play by George Bernard Shaw about 15th-century French military figure Joan of Arc. Premiering in 1923, three years after her canonization by the Roman Catholic Church, the play reflects Shaw's belief that the people involved in Joan's trial acted according to what they thought was right. He wrote in his preface to the play: ÒThere are no villains in the piece. Crime, like disease, is not interesting: it is something to be done away with by general consent, and that is all [there is] about it. It is what men do at their best, with good intentions, and what normal men and women find that they must and will do in spite of their intentions, that really concern us.Ó (Wikipedia)...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    George Bernard Shaw presents two thinly veiled political allegories, shockingly applicable to today's society. In "The Music Cure," a patient in dire need of treatment finds a solution just crazy enough to work, and a doctor just as maniacal. In the second feature, "The Inca of Perusalem" is the mightiest ruler of them all, and fearsome enough to keep himself from having a true relationship with...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    George Bernard Shaw, a playwright with a few bones to pick of his own, undertakes a surgical analysis of the social philosophies underlying the work of Henrik Ibsen. Focusing his analysis on Ibsen's challenge to the conventional "ideals" which both Ibsen and Shaw consider the greatest evils in human society, Shaw summarizes and exposits sixteen of Ibsen's plays, seizing the opportunity to elucidate some of the principles dearest to himself. Some of the most striking passages reveal Shaw's radical feminist perspectives, some of which resonate as if a half-century ahead of their time. A fascinating revelation of the minds of two great and revolutionary writers (it's not always obvious whose...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    Arms and the Man is a comedy by George Bernard Shaw that takes place in 1885, during the Serbo-Bulgarian War. Raina Petkoff is engaged to the gallant Sergius Saranoff, hero of the recent Bulgarian victory over the Serbs. But she is distracted by the abrupt arrival of Captain Bluntschli, a Swiss mercenary who fought for the Serbian army. He takes refuge in her bedroom after the battle and although he is initially threatening, reveals that he carries chocolate creams instead of bullets. Will Raina marry the posturing Sergius or the chocolate cream soldier? Extra intrigue is provided by saucy servant girl Louka and her dour fiance Nicola. Produced by Devin Lawrence Edited by Macc Kay...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    Don Juan in Hell is an excerpt (Act 3, Scene 2) from George Bernard Shaw’s Man and Superman. It is often performed as a stand-alone play. In it, three characters from Mozart’s Don Giovanni (Don Juan, Dona Ana, and the statue of the Commendatore, Dona Ana’s father) meet in Hell and, joined by the Devil, have a philosophical debate on a variety of subjects, including Heaven and Hell, men, women and marriage. In the end, they all decide where they will spend eternity. Produced by Devin Lawerence Edited by Macc Kay Production executive Avalon Giuliano ICON Intern Eden Giuliano Music By AudioNautix With Their Kind Permission ©2020 Eden Garret Giuliano (P) Eden Garret...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    “Joan of Arc, a village girl from the Vosges, was born about 1412—burnt for heresy, witchcraft, and sorcery in 1431—rehabilitated after a fashion in 1456—designated Venerable in 1904—declared Blessed in 1908—and finally canonized in 1920. She is the most notable Warrior-Saint in the Christian calendar, and the queerest fish among the eccentric worthies of the Middle Ages.”—George Bernard Shaw With Saint Joan, Shaw reached the height of his fame as a dramatist. Fascinated by the story of Joan of Arc but unhappy with “the whitewash which disfigures her beyond recognition,” he presents a realistic Joan at war not just with British...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    Candida, a comedy by playwright George Bernard Shaw, was first published in 1898, as part of his Plays Pleasant. The central characters are clergyman James Morell, his wife Candida and a youthful poet, Eugene Marchbanks, who tries to win Candida's affections. The play questions Victorian notions of love and marriage, asking what a woman really desires from her husband. The cleric is a Fabian Socialist, allowing Shaw—himself a Fabian—to weave political issues, current at the time, into the story. (Summary from...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    George Bernard Shaw's Major Barbara focuses on the family of aristocratic Lady Britomart Undershaft and her estranged husband Andrew, a millionaire armaments manufacturer. Their daughters Sarah and Barbara are both engaged to be married, and Lady Britomart decides to ask Andrew for monetary support. Barbara is a Major in the Salvation Army, and agrees to let her father visit the mission in the East End of London where she works. In exchange, she agrees to visit his munitions factory. The conflict between Barbara's philanthropic idealism and her father's hard-headed capitalism clash when he decides he wants to fund the Salvation Army. Shaw's comedy, as always, delves into political and...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    Misalliance, a 1910 play by George Bernard Shaw, is an ironic examination of the romantic entanglements of a varied group of people gathered at a wealthy man's country home on a summer weekend. Most of the romantic interest centers on the host's daughter, Hypatia Tarleton, a typical Shaw heroine who exemplifies his lifelong theory that in courtship, women are the relentless pursuers and men the apprehensively pursued. Hypatia is the daughter of newly-wealthy John Tarleton who made his fortune in the unglamorous but lucrative underwear business. She is fed up with the stuffy conventions that surround her and with the hyperactive talk of the men in her life. Hypatia is engaged to Bentley...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    Gifted playwright George Bernard Shaw's Saint Joan is based on the life and trials of Joan of Arc whose canonisation occurred shortly before he wrote this play. Based on both substantial information of her life in Medieval France and records of her trial, Shaw characterizes this unique woman caught between the forces of the Church and law in this classic production with a strong cast supporting Siobhan McKenna's fine interpretation of this tragic...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    The play Don Juan in Hell originated as Act 3, Scene 2, of Man and Superman and is a spirited debate between Heaven and Hell. It was written by Irish playwright and a master of social commentary George Bernard Shaw (1856 1950), who is probably most famous for Pygmalion amongst his 60 plays. Shaw was the only person to ever win a Nobel Prize in literature and an Oscar. This famous performance features Charles Boyer as Don Juan, Charles Laughton as the Devil, Cedric Hardwicke as the Commander, and Agnes Moorehead as Doña...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    “What is life but a series of inspired follies? The difficulty is to find them to do. Never lose a chance: it doesn’t come every day.” Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw is the fascinating tale of Henry Higgins, a professor of speech and phonetics who takes on the task of teaching Eliza Doolittle, a lower-class flower seller, how to “act like a lady.” The street-smart Eliza knows how to fend for herself in many ways but wishes to become more ladylike, and Higgins claims that he can teach her to pass as a duchess simply by teaching her how to speak. The duo’s dynamic personalities clash, and the play follows their antics as Higgins imparts his book knowledge to a stubborn Eliza,...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    George Bernard Shaw's tale of marital fidelity, challenged by Eugene Marchbanks (James Lancaster), a young poet. Wedded life between Candida (Samantha Eggar), the beautiful wife of the successful London clergyman, James Morell (David Warner), appears to be satisfactory, but Marchbanks believes that Candida is missing something very important. He thinks he has the answer. Also starring William Windom, Kathleen Freeman, John Bliss, and John...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    Arms and the Man is a comedy by George Bernard Shaw that takes place in 1885, during the Serbo-Bulgarian War. Raina Petkoff is engaged to the gallant Sergius Saranoff, hero of the recent Bulgarian victory over the Serbs. But she is distracted by the abrupt arrival of Captain Bluntschli, a Swiss mercenary who fought for the Serbian army. He takes refuge in her bedroom after the battle and although he is initially threatening, reveals that he carries chocolate creams instead of bullets. Will Raina marry the posturing Sergius or the chocolate cream soldier? Extra intrigue is provided by saucy servant girl Louka, her dour fiance Nicola, and Raina's hand-wringing parents. (Summary by Elizabeth...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    Don Juan in Hell is an excerpt (Act 3, Scene 2) from George Bernard Shaw’s Man and Superman. It is often performed as a stand-alone play. In it, three characters from Mozart’s Don Giovanni (Don Juan, Dona Ana, and the statue of the Commendatore, Dona Ana’s father) meet in Hell and, joined by the Devil, have a philosophical debate on a variety of subjects, including Heaven and Hell, men, women and marriage. In the end, they all decide where they will spend eternity. (Summary by Bob...read more

  • George Bernard Shaw

    The Perfect Wagnerite: A Commentary on the Niblung's Ring (originally published London, 1898) is a philosophical commentary on Richard Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen, by the Irish writer George Bernard Shaw. Shaw offered it to those enthusiastic admirers of Wagner who "were unable to follow his ideas, and do not in the least understand the dilemma of Wotan." He interprets the Ring in Marxian terms as an allegory of the collapse of capitalism from its internal contradictions. Musicologically, his interpretation is noteworthy for its perception of the change in aesthetic direction beginning with the final scene of Siegfried, in which he claimed that the cycle turns from Musikdrama back...read more