Searching for: "George MacDonald"

  • George MacDonald

    The Princess and the Goblin is an enthralling fantasy tale written by George MacDonald. Her nurse Lootie raises the princess Irene in a house on a mountain, it is here that she meets her mysterious great-great-grandmother, and her friend the minor boy Curdie. Things are peaceful for Irene until the hideous race of goblins that live beneath the mountain start planning something...read more

  • George MacDonald

    George MacDonald's fairy stories and fantasy have inspired a number of writers including C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien and of this popular fairy story, which as you might suspect concerns a little princess plotted against by a race of goblins, G.K. Chesterton said that it "made a difference to my whole existence." (Summary by Andy...read more

  • George MacDonald

    Plenty of princesses have been cursed by wicked witches, but the curse placed on this princess by her evil aunt is an unusual one: it removes all the princess's gravity. What can break the curse before the princess floats away? Perhaps the best thing for her would be to fall in love, but how a person with no gravity can fall in anything is just the problem. (summary by...read more

  • George MacDonald Fraser

    The story of what happened to Flashman, the caddish bully of Tom Brown's Schooldays, after he was expelled in drunken disgrace from Rugby school in the late...read more

  • George MacDonald

    Also known as "A Double Story" or "The Wise Woman." The story of two very spoiled girls, a princess and a peasant, who are kidnapped by a strange woman for a lesson in life. They may not emerge the same... but will their parents be changed for the better too? (Summary by...read more

  • George MacDonald

    The Princess and Curdie is the sequel to The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald. It's been a year since the Princess Irene and Curdie first met, and a year since the goblin incident and all appears to be going well in the Kingdom. Or is it? After a visit from Irene's great-great-grandmother, Curdie finds himself on a mission to save the kingdom, with a rather strange companion in...read more

  • George MacDonald

    George MacDonald claimed that he did not write for children, but for the child-like. Some of his longer works are clearly intended for adults, and this fantastic fiction influenced later writers such as G.K. Chesterton, J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis. But you can find some of his best writing in the stories aimed squarely at children, and these are three of the finest. The Light Princess. A wicked aunt curses her baby niece so that gravity has no effect on her, and she floats through the air as if it were water.The only way to break the curse is to make the princess cry. The Giant's Heart. Two children argue and run away to Giantland. There they find out that one of the Giants steals...read more

  • George MacDonald

    Written at the height of George MacDonald's literary career, the story centers around the life of a simple merchant's daughter. Mary Marston's unswerving commitment to love, God, and others is contrasted with a backdrop of an array of characters and a complex and sometimes mysterious plot. It is a story of a woman who loves a man, and teaches him to change. Not out of his love for her, but simply because it was the right thing to do. MacDonald allows the characters a range from delightful to devious. As such, they were intended to serve as models. His message is that all eventually must stand before God. (Summary text from...read more

  • George MacDonald

    George MacDonald was an influential Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. MacDonald's works (particularly his fairy tales and fantasy novels) claimed the admiration of such authors as J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, and Madeleine L'Engle. The Wise Woman fairy tale was one of MacDonald's more popular works. This delightful story describes how a woman of mysterious powers pays visits to two very different young girls: one a princess, the other a shepherd's daughter. Neither girl is left unchanged by the startling events that are unleashed as a result: and the reader is confronted by astonishing fairy-worlds in which the girls are forced to choose between good and evil. The Wise...read more

  • George MacDonald Fraser

    In this volume of The Flashman Papers, Flashman, the arch-cad and toady, matches his wits, his talents for deceit and malice, and above all his speed in evasion against the most brilliant European statesman and against the most beauiful and unscrupulous adventuress of the era. From London gaming-halls and English hunting-fields to European dungeons and throne-rooms, he is involved in a desperate succession of escapes, disguises, amours and (when he cannot avoid them) hand-to-hand combats. All the while, the destiny of a continent rests on his broad and failing...read more

  • George MacDonald Fraser

    “Hilariously funny.”—The New York Times Book Review   “Great dirty fun!”—Grand Rapids Press   “The most entertaining anti-hero in a long time… Moves from one ribald and deliciously corrupt episode to the next… Wonderful and scandalous.”—Publishers Weekly The fourth volume of memoirs in which Harry Flashman confronts destiny with Lord Cardigan and the Light Brigade. Part of the Flashman series, comprising Flashman, Royal Flash, and Flash for Freedom, among others, which explores the successful though scandalous later career of the bully in Tom Brown's School...read more

  • George MacDonald

    George MacDonald was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. In his day he was considered one of the great Victorian authors on par with Dickens, Thackeray, Kipling and the like. His reputation as an author, however, has not fared as well largely because of the ubiquitous and fervent presence of religion throughout his works. MacDonald's theology, though sprinkled liberally throughout his fairly substantial number of books, is perhaps nowhere more palpable than in Unspoken Sermons. These sermons, though by no means amongst the most popular of MacDonald's work, have had theological impact from their first appearance. That influence is probably most notable in C.S. Lewis who...read more

  • George MacDonald Fraser

    A game of cards leads Flashman from the jungle death-house of Dahomey to the slave state of Mississippi as he dabbles in the slave trade in Volume III of the Flashman Papers. When Flashman was inveigled into a game of pontoon with Disraeli and Lord George Bentinck, he was making an unconscious choice about his own future - would it lie in the House of Commons or the West African slave trade? Was there, for that matter, very much difference? Once again Flashman's charm, cowardice, treachery, lechery and fleetness of foot see the lovable rogue triumph by the skin of his chattering...read more

  • George MacDonald

    In this sequel to The Princess and the Goblin, Curdie has returned to his life as a miner and has dismissed the supernatural happenings of the past, believing them to have been a dream. When Curdie callously wounds a pigeon, his conscience leads him to Princess Irene's mystical great-great-grandmother for help. She has him plunge his hands into a pile of rose petals that burns like fire. Extraordinarily, this grants him the power to see what kind of 'animal' a person is at heart. She then sends him on a quest, accompanied by a peculiar doglike creature named Lina, who was once a human. However, Curdie must resolve his own skepticism before he can use the powers granted him to defeat the...read more

  • George MacDonald

    In this inspirational collection of twelve sermons, George MacDonald offers compelling insight into the life of Jesus Christ. MacDonald stressed the necessity of salvation and the importance of combining Christian faith with obedience to Jesus’ teachings. He also believed that God’s universal grace would eventually save everyone. Though written in the mid-nineteenth century, these sermons, including “Mirrors of Christ,” “Glorified through Trouble, “Salvation from Sin,” and “The Giver of Rest,” continue to provide contemporary followers with the spiritual guidance they seek. For those who wish to know Jesus better, this is a book you...read more

  • George MacDonald

    Admired by J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis and considered by W. H. Auden to be “the only English children’s book in the same class as the Alice books,” The Princess and the Goblin is a classic example of nineteenth-century children’s literary fairy tales. This is an ageless tale of courage and loyalty, beauty and mystery, and above all, good and evil. The discovery of a secret stairway running to the top of the castle where she lives leads Princess Irene to a revelation even more weighty than the fiendish plans of the goblin community that Curdie, a miner boy, has discovered. Will the Princess and Curdie understand the significance of what they have found, or will...read more

  • George MacDonald Fraser

    The inimitable and appallingly appealing Flashy is back, in a long-awaited new installment of The Flashman Papers. When the memoirs of Sir Harry Flashman, the notorious Victorian soldier and scoundrel, first came to light thirty years ago, it was finally revealed what had become of the infamous bully who had darkened Tom Brown's school days. Now, three new episodes in the career of this eminently disreputable adventurer place us at the center of pivotal historical events--the attempted assassination of Emperor Franz Josef in the 1880s, the Prince of Wales's involvement in the Tranby Croft gambling scandal, and the military disaster at Rorke's Drift in South Africa--as the aging but agile...read more

  • George MacDonald

    George MacDonald (December 10, 1824 - September 18, 1905) was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. Though no longer well known, his works (particularly his fairy tales and fantasy novels) have inspired admiration in such notables as W. H. Auden, J. R. R. Tolkien, and Madeleine L'Engle. The Shadows is one such fairy tale. The strange Shadows spend their existence casting themselves upon the walls and forming pictures of various sorts: mimicking evil actions of those who have done wrong in the hopes of causing their repentance, playing a comic dumb-show to inspire a playwright and dancing to inspire a musician, nudging a little girl to comfort her grandfather, and playing with a...read more

  • Hans Christian Andersen

    “I do not write for children, but for the childlike, whether of five or fifty or seventy-five.” — George MacDonald The Princess and the Goblin, first published in 1872, was one of the very first fantasy novels and had a strong influence on the work of Lewis Carroll, C.S. Lewis, and J.R.R. Tolkien. Fans of fantasy-fiction love it to this day. Eight-year-old Princess Irene lives in a remote mountainous region with no one but her nursemaid for company. Then she meets a mysterious old woman and Curdie, a young miner. Meanwhile, deep in the heart of the earth beneath her lurk grotesque and hideous creatures seeking vengeance against human kind. The Goblin and the Grocer by Hans...read more

  • George MacDonald Fraser

    Harry Flashman: the unrepentant bully of Tom Brown's schooldays, now with a Victoria Cross, has three main talents - horsemanship, facility with foreign languages and fornication. A reluctant military hero, Flashman plays a key part in most of the defining military campaigns of the 19th century, despite trying his utmost to escape them all. Flashman, soldier, duellist, lover, imposter, coward, cad and hero, triumphs in this first instalment of The Flashman Papers. His adventures as the reluctant secret agent in Afghanistan and his entry into the exclusive company of Lord Cardigan's Hussars culminate in his foulest hour - his part in the historic disaster of the Retreat from...read more