Searching for: "George Macdonald"

  • George MacDonald

    A favorite author of C.S. Lewis, George MacDonald delivers another lovely tale in the story The Wise Woman. It is a story of two girls, one is a princess and the other a daughter of a shepherd; both are spoiled and self-serving. Their lives are forever changed when they encounter the Wise Woman, who undertakes to teach them virtue with an astounding balance of grace and truth. Firm and loving, the Wise Woman is everything a good parent could hope to be, and a refreshing portrayal of the Heavenly Parent of us...read more

  • George MacDonald

    Join the children Tangle and Mossy as they embark on a journey of faith, spiritual maturity, and sanctification. Richly imaginative and sparkling with mythic qualities, this story communicates the joy of entering into faith as a child, traveling through life with a loving companion, and longing for the heavenly country. Poignant and beautifully written, The Golden Key will nourish both faith and imagination in the listener. C.S. Lewis delighted in the cleansing ability of reading George MacDonald, and The Golden Key certainly possesses that...read more

  • George MacDonald

    The Light Princess is a short story that is warm and humorous, with a surprisingly poignant conclusion. A princess doomed by a witch to lose her “gravity” results in a silly heroine that has neither physical nor spiritual weight. George MacDonald’s masterful teaching on the subject of sacrificial love is delivered eloquently in the events and characters of this engaging...read more

  • Hans Christian Andersen

    “I do not write for children, but for the childlike, whether of five or fifty or seventy-five.” — George MacDonald The Princess and the Goblin, first published in 1872, was one of the very first fantasy novels and had a strong influence on the work of Lewis Carroll, C.S. Lewis, and J.R.R. Tolkien. Fans of fantasy-fiction love it to this day. Eight-year-old Princess Irene lives in a remote mountainous region with no one but her nursemaid for company. Then she meets a mysterious old woman and Curdie, a young miner. Meanwhile, deep in the heart of the earth beneath her lurk grotesque and hideous creatures seeking vengeance against human kind. The Goblin and the Grocer by Hans...read more

  • George MacDonald

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 14 recordings of Mother Nature by George MacDonald. This was the Weekly Poetry project for March 3, 2013. George MacDonald was a Scottish author, poet and Christian minister. He inspired J. R. R. Tolkien and other authors with his fairy tales and fantasy novels. (Summary by David...read more

  • George MacDonald

    George MacDonald was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. In his day he was considered one of the great Victorian authors on par with Dickens, Thackeray, Kipling and the like. His reputation as an author, however, has not fared as well largely because of the ubiquitous and fervent presence of religion throughout his works. MacDonald's theology, though sprinkled liberally throughout his fairly substantial number of books, is perhaps nowhere more palpable than in Unspoken Sermons. These sermons, though by no means amongst the most popular of MacDonald's work, have had theological impact from their first appearance. That influence is probably most notable in C.S. Lewis who...read more

  • George MacDonald

    St. George and St. Michael’ is a little-known historical romance telling the story of a young couple who find themselves on opposing sides during the tumultuous years of the English Civil Wars. Tensions are rising between king and parliament, the Church of England and the numerous independent puritans, and rumours abound that Charles I will soon declare open war on the dissident elements within his realm. Seventeen-year-old Dorothy Vaughan knows little of the brewing conflict, yet is sure that her loyalty must be with her king and her nation. When she challenges her childhood friend, Richard Heywood, to prove himself a man and so worthy of winning her hand in marriage by becoming...read more

  • George MacDonald

    A witch’s curse ensures that a boy can never wake at night nor sleep when the sun beams. Conversely, a girl is doomed never to slumber at night nor be awake during daylight hours. Finally, a twist of fate unites them. MacDonald’s skill in imagery and grandfatherly style deliver a remarkable story that is accessible and light, yet acutely stirring and imbued with enduring value. Your capacity for imagination is sure to grow through this story that lifts our spirits and fills our minds with...read more

  • George Macdonald

    It is the story of Mr. Vane, an orphan and heir to a large house -- a house in which he has a vision that leads him through a large old mirror into another world. In chronicling the five trips Mr. Vane makes to this other world, MacDonald hauntingly explores the ultimate mystery of...read more

  • George MacDonald Fraser

    George MacDonald Fraser—beloved for his series of Flashman historical novels—offers an action-packed memoir of his experiences in Burma during World War II.  Fraser was only 19 when he arrived there in the war’s final year, and he offers a first-hand glimpse at the camaraderie, danger, and satisfactions of service. A substantial Epilogue, occasioned by the 50th anniversary of VJ-Day in 1995, adds poignancy to a volume that eminent military historian John Keegan described as “one of the great personal memoirs of the Second World...read more

  • George MacDonald

    George MacDonald was an influential Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. MacDonald's works (particularly his fairy tales and fantasy novels) claimed the admiration of such authors as J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, and Madeleine L'Engle. The Wise Woman fairy tale was one of MacDonald's more popular works. This delightful story describes how a woman of mysterious powers pays visits to two very different young girls: one a princess, the other a shepherd's daughter. Neither girl is left unchanged by the startling events that are unleashed as a result: and the reader is confronted by astonishing fairy-worlds in which the girls are forced to choose between good and evil. The Wise...read more

  • George MacDonald

    George MacDonald was the great nineteenth-century innovator of modern fantasy, who influenced the work of C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams. This book collects some of his finest fairy stories, including "The Gray Wolf," "The Cruel Painter," "The Broken Swords," "The Wow O'Rivven, the Bell" "Uncle Cornelius, His Story," "The Butcher's Bills," and "Birth, Dreaming, Death." "I do not write," MacDonald once said, "for children, but for the childlike, whether of five, or fifty, or seventy-five." Here then, for the childlike of all ages, is a collection of seven stories certain to delight both confirmed MacDonald readers and those about to meet him for the first...read more

  • George MacDonald

    In this inspirational collection of twelve sermons, George MacDonald offers compelling insight into the life of Jesus Christ. MacDonald stressed the necessity of salvation and the importance of combining Christian faith with obedience to Jesus’ teachings. He also believed that God’s universal grace would eventually save everyone. Though written in the mid-nineteenth century, these sermons, including “Mirrors of Christ,” “Glorified through Trouble, “Salvation from Sin,” and “The Giver of Rest,” continue to provide contemporary followers with the spiritual guidance they seek. For those who wish to know Jesus better, this is a book you...read more

  • George MacDonald

    One of the most successful and beloved Victorian fairy tales... The Princess and the Goblin is the story of Princess Irene and her friend Curdie, who come face to face with the dreaded mountain goblins. This children’s fantasy novel was originally published in 1872. It uses subtle layers of symbolism to tell a story of courage and...read more

  • George MacDonald

    Overshadowed by the dark legend of the murderous rider of the horse with the loose shoe, Duncan Campbell sets out from his home in the Highlands to make his fortune in the world. When he finds the woman whose destiny is mingled with his, he must overcome first her indifference, then the malice of her family, then the forces of space and time. Will he ever put to rest the old curse? George MacDonald was an influence on many famous fantasy writers, including C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, and Madeleine L'Engle. This fantasy romance derives from MacDonald's own Celtic tradition of the "Second Sight". It is a daydream, but one which holds up a mirror to human nature and shows us the truth of...read more

  • George MacDonald

    Written at the height of George MacDonald's literary career, the story centers around the life of a simple merchant's daughter. Mary Marston's unswerving commitment to love, God, and others is contrasted with a backdrop of an array of characters and a complex and sometimes mysterious plot. It is a story of a woman who loves a man, and teaches him to change. Not out of his love for her, but simply because it was the right thing to do. MacDonald allows the characters a range from delightful to devious. As such, they were intended to serve as models. His message is that all eventually must stand before God. (Summary text from...read more

  • George MacDonald

    Revolutionary for the time in encouraging children to think like children, the adventure of Princess Irene and Curdie, the boy miner, was to influence generations of writers, including Chesterton and Tolkien. Overflowing with fantastic ideas and images to delight the young and allegory to inspire their morality ‘The Princess and the Goblin’ has remained one of the most exciting tales for over 100 years.Irene lives in a castle on a mountain under which there is a labyrinth of tunnels inhabited by Goblins. Also, within the hillsides, is a group of miners digging for precious metals. When the Goblins try to kidnap the Princess and flood the mines it is up to Curdie, the boy miner, and...read more

  • George MacDonald

    David Elginbrod was George Macdonald's first real success, a novel of Scottish country life. Published in 1862, it was dedicated to the memory of Lady Noel Byron.(Summary from...read more

  • George MacDonald

    A boy named Photogen, who has never seen the moon, meets a girl named Nycteris, who has never seen the sun. The two of them must escape from the witch Watho. As usual with George MacDonald, this fairy tale has layers of meaning that go deeper than the story on the surface. (summary by L.A....read more

  • George MacDonald

    George MacDonald claimed that he did not write for children, but for the child-like. Some of his longer works are clearly intended for adults, and this fantastic fiction influenced later writers such as G.K. Chesterton, J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis. But you can find some of his best writing in the stories aimed squarely at children, and these are three of the finest. The Light Princess. A wicked aunt curses her baby niece so that gravity has no effect on her, and she floats through the air as if it were water.The only way to break the curse is to make the princess cry. The Giant's Heart. Two children argue and run away to Giantland. There they find out that one of the Giants steals...read more