Searching for: "Harriet Beecher Stowe"

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    The story telling genius of Harriet Beecher Stowe is never more obvious than in these animal stories. Meant to enchant as well as instruct young listeners on the dilemmas we face growing up, Ms. Stowe sees through the eyes of the forest creatures, large and small, and shows us how things might work in the adventure of growing "big". This set of short tales include: 1. Hen that Hatched Ducks 2. The Nutcrackers of Nutcracker Lodge 3. The History of Tip-Top 4. Miss Katy-did and Miss Cricket 5. Mother Magpie's Mischief 6. The Squirrels That Live in a House 7. Hum, Son of Buz 8. Our Country Neighbors 9. The Diverting History of Little Whiskey AUTHOR Harriet Beecher Stowe...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    Painstakingly based upon the classic 1852 novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe re-tells the story to allow young readers a glimpse into the darker side of American History. Uncle Tom's Cabin was the best selling novel of the 1800s and had an enormous influence in gallvanizing public opinion against slavery. Uncle Tom's Cabin is the story of two slaves who's master must sell them to settle his debts. Uncle Tom is sold ""down the river"", away from his wife and children, Eliza decides to escape. Uncle Tom has a great faith in God and is a righteous man, but is sorely tested when he is sold to a sadist owner named Simon Legree. Does Eliza make it to Canada? Will...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    Onkel Tom, ein alter schwarzer Sklave aus Kentucky, erlebt zunächst nur glückliche Tage bei seinem neuen Herrn Augustin St. Clare und seiner Tochter Evangeline. Aber dann lernt er plötzlich auf einer Baumwollplantage in Louisiana den ganzen Schrecken seines ärmlichen Sklavendaseins...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    'One thing is certain, - that there is a mustering among the masses, the world over; and there is a dis irae coming on, sooner or later.'Viewed by many as fuelling the abolitionist movement of the 1850s and laying the groundwork for the Civil War, Harriet Beecher Stowe's sentimental and moral tale of slaves attempting to secure their freedom was one of the most popular books of the nineteenth century. Centred round the long-suffering Uncle Tom, a devout Christian slave who endures cruelty and abuse from his owners, Tom is often celebrated as the first black hero in American fiction who refuses to obey his white masters. With other strong protagonists such as Eliza, a courageous slave who...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    Among the most “banned” books in the United States, Uncle Tom’s Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly is a novel by American author Harriet Beecher Stowe which treats slavery as a central theme. Stowe was a Connecticut-born teacher at the Hartford Female Academy and an active abolitionist. The novel is believed to have had a profound effect on the North’s view of slavery. In fact, when he met Harriet Beecher Stowe, President Lincoln is said to have commented, “So you’re the little lady whose book started the Civil War.” First published on March 20, 1852, the story focuses on the tale of Uncle Tom, a long-suffering black slave, the central character around whose life the other...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    Among the most "banned" books in the United States, Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly is a novel by American author Harriet Beecher Stowe which treats slavery as a central theme. Stowe was a Connecticut-born teacher at the Hartford Female Academy and an active abolitionist. The novel is believed to have had a profound effect on the North's view of slavery. In fact, when he met Harriet Beecher Stowe, President Lincoln is said to have commented, "So you're the little lady whose book started the Civil War." First published on March 20, 1852, the story focuses on the tale of Uncle Tom, a long-suffering black slave, the central character around whose life the other characters-both...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    Among the most banned books in the United States, Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly is a novel by American author Harriet Beecher Stowe which treats slavery as a central theme. Stowe was a Connecticut-born teacher at the Hartford Female Academy and an active abolitionist. The novel is believed to have had a profound effect on the North's view of slavery. In fact, when he met Harriet Beecher Stowe, President Lincoln is said to have commented, So you're the little lady whose book started the Civil War. First published on March 20, 1852, the story focuses on the tale of Uncle Tom, a long-suffering black slave, the central character around whose life the other characters—both fellow...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    LibriVox volunteers bring you 9 recordings of Eliza Crossing the River by Harriet Beecher Stowe. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for April 27th, 2014. Harriet Beecher Stowe was an American abolitionist and author. Her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) was a depiction of life for African Americans under slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential in the United States and United Kingdom. It energized anti-slavery forces in the American North, while provoking widespread anger in the South. She wrote more than 20 books, including novels, three travel memoirs, and collections of articles and letters. She was influential both for her writings and her public...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    Uncle Tom is a high-minded, devoutly Christian black slave to a kind family, the Shelbys. Beset by financial difficulties, the Shelbys sell Tom to a slave trader. Young George Shelby promises to someday redeem him. The story relates Uncle Tom’s trials, suffering, and religious fortitude. Uncle Tom’s Cabin was revolutionary in 1852 for its passionate indictment of slavery and for its presentation of Tom, “a man of humanity,” as the first black hero in American fiction. Upon meeting Harriet Beecher Stowe, Abraham Lincoln allegedly remarked, “So this is the little lady who started this new great war!” The novel became an overnight sensation and was hailed...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    Uncle Tom's Cabin opens with a Kentucky farmer named Arthur Shelby facing the loss of his farm because of debts. Even though he and his wife, Emily Shelby, believe that they have a benevolent relationship with their slaves, Shelby decides to raise the needed funds by selling two of them-Uncle Tom, a middle-aged man with a wife and children, and Harry, the son of Emily Shelby's maid Eliza-to a slave trader. Emily Shelby hates the idea of doing this because she had promised her maid that her child would never be sold; Emily's son, George Shelby, hates to see Tom go because he sees the old man as his friend and mentor. When Uncle Tom's Cabin was published in 1852, it became an international...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    Neither before nor after the publication of Uncle Tom’s Cabin has a woman ever so moved America to take action against injustice as Harriet Beecher Stowe.Published in 1852, Uncle Tom's Cabin brought the abolitionists' message to the public conscience. Indeed, Abraham Lincoln greeted Stowe in 1863 as 'the little lady who made this big war.'Eliza Harris, a slave whose child is to be sold, escapes her beloved home on the Shelby plantation in Kentucky and heads North, eluding the hired slave catchers. Aided by the Underground Railroad, Quakers, and others opposed to the Fugitive Slave Act, Eliza, her son, and her husband George run toward Canada.As the Harrises flee to freedom, another slave,...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    The novel is believed to have had a profound effect on the North’s view of slavery. In fact, when he met Harriet Beecher Stowe, President Lincoln is said to have commented, “So you’re the little lady whose book started the Civil War.” Uncle Tom's Cabin was the best-selling novel of the 19th century and the second best-selling book of that century, following the Bible. First published on March 20, 1852, the story focuses on the tale of Uncle Tom, a long-suffering black slave, the central character around whose life the other characters—both fellow slaves and slave owners—revolve. The novel depicts the harsh reality of slavery while also showing that Christian love and faith...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    An enjoyable collection of animal stories from the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin Meant to enchant and instruct young listeners, Harriet Beecher Stowe sees through the eyes of the forest creatures, large and small, and shows us how things might work in the adventure of growing 'big.' Queer Little Folks includes: 'Hen That Hatched Ducks' 'The Nutcrackers of Nutcracker Lodge' 'The History of Tip-Top' 'Miss Katy-Did and Miss Cricket' 'Mother Magpie's Mischief ''The Squirrels That Live in a House' 'Hum, Son of Buz' 'Our Country Neighbors' 'The Diverting History of Little...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    Based on the classic 1852 novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe re-tells the story to allow young readers a glimpse into the darker side of American history. Uncle Tom's Cabin was the bestselling novel of the 1800s and had an enormous influence in galvanizing public opinion against slavery. Uncle Tom's Cabin is the story of two slaves who's master must sell them to settle his debts. Uncle Tom is sold 'down the river,' away from his wife and children, and Eliza decides to escape. Uncle Tom has a great faith in God and is a righteous man, but he is sorely tested when he is sold to a sadist owner named Simon Legree. Does Eliza make it to Canada? Will Uncle Tom survive Simon...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    Librivox volunteers bring you ten readings of Still, Still, with Thee by Harriet Beecher Stowe. This hymn written by the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin was the weekly poem for December 14 - 21, 2014. - Summary by...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    A sequel to Oldtown Folks, featuring some of the same characters, these are 15 charming short stories told by ole' Sam Lawson to entertain Horace and Bill, two impressionable, curious and clever young boys of Oldtown (a fictional 1850's New England village), during evenings gathered around the hearth, or roaming with Sam around the countryside. Stowe faithfully and masterfully captures many of the colloquial expressions, superstitions, beliefs, customs and habits of the period that have almost completely faded from modern American culture, as well as conveying many truths about the human condition that haven't changed a bit. ~ Summary by soloist Michele...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    This Christmas tale set in Colonial New England was originally published in the 1895 collection A Budget of Christmas Tales by Charles Dickens and Others. The short story takes place in a fictionalized version of Litchfield, Connecticut, the town where Stowe grew up, which is also the setting of her novel Poganuc People: Their Loves and Lives. This version of Christmas in Poganuc was recorded as part of Dreamscape's Classic Christmas Stories: A Collection of Timeless Holiday...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    "There are nearly four millions of slaves in the United States; and the question now presents itself to every free born American citizen; what are we to do with them? The abolition party demand their immediate emancipation. Is it practicable, safe, or proper? What would be the consequences? What would be the consequence of turning loose upon ourselves four millions of human beings, to prowl about like wild beasts without restraint, or control, and commit depredations on the white population?" -Excerpted from "A Review of Uncle Tom's Cabin," by A. Woodward, M.D.,...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    This is the great anti-slavery novel that, it is said, convinced many Americans to join the Civil War against the South. Published in 1852, it tells the story of Uncle Tom, a patient, forbearing slave and his misfortunes in a life of being sold from one master to the...read more

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe

    In debt, Kentucky farmer Arthur Shelby reluctantly decides to trade two of his slaves. The two, middle-aged Uncle Tom and young Harry, are to be sold to Mr. Haley, a detestable slave trader. Eliza, Harry's mother and Mrs. Shelby's maid, overhears the details of the arraignment, warns Uncle Tom and flees with Harry to the north. Eliza and Harry barely make it across the Ohio River before slave catchers can catch up with them. On the run, Eliza and her family seek shelter and safety. Meanwhile, Uncle Tom, who refused to run away, is separated from his family and sold down river. As novel progresses, the juxtaposed narratives highlight the harsh reality of...read more