Searching for: "Helen Keller"

  • Helen Keller

    In this essay originally aired in the 1950s, deaf and blind author, activist, and lecturer Helen Keller discusses her vision of faith and how it gives her hope for the future of mankind in 'The Light of a Brighter Day', her contribution to NPR's This I Believe series. This I Believe is a National Public Radio program that features Americans, from the famous to the unknown, completing the thought that begins with the series title. The pieces that make up the program compel listeners to re-think not only what and how they have arrived at their own personal beliefs, but also the extent to which they share them with others. Featuring a star-studded list of contributors that includes John...read more

  • Helen Keller

    Helen Keller was born on June 27, 1880, in Tuscumbia, Alabama. Though born with the ability to see and hear, at 19 months-old she contracted an acute illness that left her both deaf and blind. Eventually, 20-year-old Anne Sullivan, herself visually impaired, became Keller's speech instructor. It was the beginning of a 49-year-long relationship during which Sullivan evolved into Keller's governess and eventually her companion. In 1914, Sullivan's health began to fail, so a young woman from Scotland, Polly Thomson, was hired to keep house. Though she had no experience with deaf or blind people, Thompson progressed to working as a secretary, and eventually became a constant companion to...read more

  • Helen Keller

    Helen Keller overcame the seemingly insurmountable obstacles of deafness and blindness to become an icon of perseverance, respected and honored by readers, historians, and activists. Her autobiography The Story of My Life, published in the United States in 1903, is still read today for its ability to motivate and reassure readers. Helen began working on The Story of My Life while a student at Radcliffe College with help from John Albert Macy, a Harvard professor and future husband of Helen's first teacher and lifelong companion, Anne Sullivan. In the book Keller recounts the first twenty-two years of her life, from her early childhood illness that left her blind and deaf through her second...read more

  • Helen Keller

    'Life is either a daring adventure, or nothing.' -Helen Keller Before she was two years old, scarlet fever destroyed Helen Keller's sight and hearing. At seven, alone and withdrawn, she was rescued by Anne Sullivan, her teacher and friend. She learned to read (in several different languages) and speak so well that she graduated with honors in 1904 from Radcliffe, where she authored The Story of My Life. In addition to her remarkable accomplishment of overcoming such huge disabilities, her other achievements are impressive in their own right. She published thirteen books and numerous articles; she devoted her life to social reform; and she campaigned on behalf of the handicapped in...read more

  • Helen Keller

    The autobiography of the greatly admired blind and deaf Helen Keller, written while she was still a junior at Radcliffe College. ""I do not want the peace which passeth understanding, I want the understanding which bringeth peace."" -- Helen Keller CONTENTS: 23...read more

  • Helen Keller

    The World I Live In by Helen Keller is a collection of essays that poignantly tells of her impressions of the world, through her sense of touch, smell, her imagination and dreams. My hand is to me what your hearing and sight together are to you. In large measure we travel the same highways, read the same books, speak the same language, yet our experiences are different. All my comings and goings turn on the hand as on a pivot. It is the hand that binds me to the world of men and women. The hand is my feeler with which I reach through isolation and darkness and seize every pleasure, every activity that my fingers encounter. With the dropping of a little word from another's hand into mine, a...read more

  • Helen Keller

    "Three days to see" is Helen Keller's representative work. From her view as a crackpot but strong in heart lady, she advised people with health body to cherish life, to cherish everything the Lord has provided. Besides, another article included in this book is Helen's autobiography, which is praised as "without a compeer in the history of the world...read more

  • Helen Keller

    Helen Keller's autobiography, The Story of My Life, tells of her early life and of her experiences with Annie Sullivan, her teacher and companion. It was first published in 1903. Keller was the first deaf-blind person to attain a Bachelor of Arts degree, became well traveled and a prolific author, and was outspoken in her campaigning against war and for many other progressive causes. This story shows how Annie Sullivan helped Keller break through her isolation and absence of language to blossom and learn to live in the world of...read more

  • Helen Keller

    Helen Keller's triumph over blindness and deafness has become one of the most inspiring stories of our time. Popularized through plays and movies, it is an unparalleled chronicle of courage and a timeless testament to human strength. With sincerity and eloquence, Keller reveals her frustrations and rage, and takes the reader on the unforgettable journey of her education and journey to...read more

  • Helen Keller

    A serious illness destroyed Helen Keller's sight and hearing at the age of two. At seven, she was helped by Anne Sullivan, her beloved teacher and friend. Through sheer determination and resolve, she learned to speak and prepared herself for entry into prep school by age sixteen. Later she enrolled at Radcliffe and graduated with honors. Her motto: "There are no handicaps, only...read more

  • Helen Keller

    The Story of My Life is a personal account of Helen Keller's life, from her early days to those as an adult. It includes how she came to meet her teacher Ann Sullivan, and learnt to communicate using the manual alphabet. It then goes on to chronicle her days as a college student. (Summary by...read more