Searching for: "Henry David Thoreau"

  • Henry David Thoreau

    Henry David Thoreau was a 19th century American writer and lifelong advocate for the abolition of slavery. His written works are many and varied but he is perhaps best known for works such as Walden, a book which promotes the idea of simple living in natural surroundings and for Civil Disobedience, which argues that the general population should not simply sit idle while those elected to government ride roughshod over their wishes. Of his other published work, Walking stands out as one which deals with the importance of nature to mankind, something which we are becoming increasingly aware of, and the reason that we cannot survive without it, either physically, mentally, or...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    Can justice be forced on individuals and communities? The essays in this collection by Henry David Thoreau urge us to consider the difficult matter of how to counter the specific injustice manifested in the practice of buying and selling human beings and how to implement laws and practices that help establish justice. Of the many philosophical ideas Thoreau explores, the central concern is how to end slavery and provide justice for all. It is no surprise to find Thoreau defending the idea of civil disobedience, but his defense of John Brown, who used violence, including murder, commands our attention. The Civil Rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s in the U.S. was heavily...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    In 1845, noted transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau spent two years, two months, and two days chronicling his near-isolation in the small cabin he built in the woods near Walden Pond on land owned by his mentor, the father of Transcendentalism, Ralph Waldo Emerson. Shedding the trivial ties that he felt bound much of humanity, Thoreau reaped from the land both physically and mentally, and pursued truth in the quiet of nature. In Walden, he explains how separating oneself from the world of men can truly awaken the sleeping self. Thoreau holds fast to the notion that you have not truly existed until you adopt such a lifestyle-and only then can you reenter society, as an enlightened being....read more

  • Henry-David Thoreau

    Henry David Thoreau es un amado autor, poeta y filósofo americano. Fue un abolicionista de toda la vida, defensor de la desobediencia civil contra los gobiernos injustos o corruptos, y defendió la idea de abandonar los asuntos ilusorios en favor de la vida simple, para descubrir las auténticas necesidades esenciales de la vida. Es más conocido por Walden, o la vida en el bosque, el libro que escribió durante su experimento de dos años de vida minimalista: habiendo construido él mismo una cabaña en el bosque, se quedó allí para estudiar, escribir y disfrutar de su recién descubierta comunión con la naturaleza. Sus trabajos políticos y la teoría de la desobediencia civil han...read more

  • Henry-David Thoreau

    Henry David Thoreau é um amado autor, poeta e filósofo americano. Foi um abolicionista para toda a vida, defensor da desobediência civil, que voltou a defender governos injustos ou corruptos, e defendeu a ideia de abandonar assuntos ilusórios em favor de uma vida simples, a fim de descobrir as autênticas necessidades essenciais da vida. É mais conhecido por Walden, ou Life in the woods, o livro que escreveu durante a sua experiência de dois anos de vida minimalista: tendo construído uma cabana na floresta, ficou lá para estudar, escrever e desfrutar da sua nova comunhão com a natureza. As suas obras políticas e teoria da desobediência civil influenciaram os pensamentos e...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    Henry David Thoreau is a beloved American author, poet and philosopher. He was a lifelong abolitionist, advocate of civil disobedience againts unjust or corrupted goverments, and he defended the idea of abandoning illusory matters in favor of simple living, in order to discover life's authentic essential needs. He is best known for Walden, or Life in the woods, the book he wrote during his two-year experiment in minimalist living: having built himself a cabin in the woods, he stayed there to study, write, and enjoy his newfound communion with nature. His political works and theory of civil disobedience have influenced the thoughts and actions of many prominent figures, such as Leo Tolstoy,...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    Im Jahr 1849 schrieb Henry David Thoreau seinen weltberühmten Essay über die 'Pflicht zum Ungehorsam gegen den Staat'. In diesem stellte er sich außerhalb einer Gesellschaft, die, obwohl auf den Prinzipien der Freiheit und Gleichheit aller gegründet, nicht in der Lage war, die Sklaverei abzuschaffen. Neben 'Walden' der wohl berühmteste Text des Eigenbrötlers aus den Wäldern von...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    Henry David Thoreau is a beloved American author, poet and philosopher. He was a lifelong abolitionist, advocate of civil disobedience againts unjust or corrupted goverments, and he defended the idea of abandoning illusory matters in favor of simple living, in order to discover life's authentic essential needs. He is best known for Walden, or Life in the woods, the book he wrote during his two-year experiment in minimalist living: having built himself a cabin in the woods, he stayed there to study, write, and enjoy his newfound communion with nature. His political works and theory of civil disobedience have influenced the thoughts and actions of many prominent figures, such as Leo Tolstoy,...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    On the Duty of Civil Disobedience, called Civil Disobedience for short, is an essay by American transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau that was first published in 1849. In it, Thoreau argues that individuals should not permit governments to overrule or atrophy their consciences, and that they have a duty to avoid allowing such acquiescence to enable the government to make them the agents of injustice. Thoreau was motivated in part by his disgust with slavery and the Mexican–American War (1846–1848). Famous essay of the author Henry David Thoreau: 'The Service', 'A Walk to Wachusett', 'Paradise (to be) Regained', 'Sir Walter Raleigh', 'Herald of Freedom', 'Wendell Phillips Before the...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    Originally published in 1854, Walden; or, Life in the Woods, is a vivid account of the time that Henry D. Thoreau lived alone in a secluded cabin at Walden Pond. It is one of the most influential and compelling books in American literature. This new paperback edition-introduced by noted American writer John Updike-celebrates the 150th anniversary of this classic work. Much of Walden's material is derived from Thoreau's journals and contains such engaging pieces as 'Reading' and 'The Pond in the Winter' Other famous sections involve Thoreau's visits with a Canadian woodcutter and with an Irish family, a trip to Concord, and a description of his bean field. This is the complete and...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    In the early spring of 1845, Henry David Thoreau built and lived in a cabin near the shore of Walden Pond in rural Massachusetts. For the next two years, he enacted his own Transcendentalist experiment, living a simple life based on self-reliance, individualism, and harmony with nature. The journal he kept at that time evolved into his masterwork, Walden, an eloquent expression of a uniquely American philosophy. During the same period, Thoreau endured a one-day imprisonment for his refusal to pay a poll tax, an act of protest against the government for supporting the Mexican War, to which he was morally opposed. In his essay "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience," he defends the principles...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    Can justice be forced on individuals and communities? The essays in this collection by Henry David Thoreau urge us to consider the difficult matter of how to counter the specific injustice manifested in the practice of buying and selling human beings and how to implement laws and practices that help establish justice. Of the many philosophical ideas Thoreau explores, the central concern is how to end slavery and provide justice for all. It is no surprise to find Thoreau defending the idea of civil disobedience, but his defense of John Brown, who used violence, including murder, commands our attention. The Civil Rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s in the U.S. was heavily influenced by the...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    In 1839, two years after graduating from Harvard, Henry David Thoreau and his older brother, John, took a boat-and-hiking trip from Concord, Massachusetts, to the White Mountains of New Hampshire. After John's sudden death in 1842, Thoreau began to prepare a memorial account of their excursion during his stay at Walden Pond. Modern readers have come to see Thoreau's story of the river journey as an appropriate predecessor to Walden, depicting the early years of his spiritual and artistic growth. "Just as the current of the stream bears along the boat with Thoreau and his brother, so the current of ideas in his mind bears along the reader by evoking the joy and nostalgia that Thoreau...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    Walden by Henry David Thoreau is one of the best-known non-fiction books written by an American. Published in 1854, it details Thoreau's life for two years, two months, and two days around the shores of Walden Pond. Walden is neither a novel nor a true autobiography, but a social critique of the Western World, with each chapter heralding some aspect of humanity that needed to be either renounced or praised. Along with his critique of the civilized world, Thoreau examines other issues afflicting man in society, ranging from economy and reading to solitude and higher laws. He also takes time to talk about the experience at Walden Pond itself, commenting on the animals and the way people...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    Civil Disobedience (Resistance to Civil Government) is an essay by American transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau that was first published in 1849. In it, Thoreau argues that individuals should not permit governments to overrule or atrophy their consciences, and that they have a duty to avoid allowing such acquiescence to enable the government to make them the agents of injustice. Thoreau was motivated in part by his disgust with slavery and the Mexican-American War. (Summary by...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    Henry David Thoreau was born July 12, 1817, in Concord, Massachusetts, where he later died on May 6, 1862. He attended Harvard University where he studied the Classics and a smattering of foreign languages. In 1845, after years of literary and emotional struggle, friend and colleague Ralph Waldo Emerson invited Thoreau to build a cabin on his land near Walden Pond, the location of which became Thoreau's inspiration. Walden records the doctrines of transcendentalism that he lived, supported, and for which he became famous. He focuses on the concept of self-knowledge, and encourages all people to find some way to learn more about themselves and the world around them. Thoreau is remembered...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    Resistance to Civil Government, called Civil Disobedience for short, is an essay by American transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau that was first published in 1849. In it, Thoreau argues that individuals should not permit governments to overrule or atrophy their consciences, and that they have a duty to avoid allowing such acquiescence to enable the government to make them the agents of injustice. Thoreau was motivated in part by his disgust with slavery and the Mexican–American War...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    A work by the great Henry David Thoreau, originally published in 1849 as 'Resistance to Civil Government'. It is an essay in which Thoreau argues that individuals should not permit governments to overrule or atrophy their consciences, and that they have a duty to avoid allowing such acquiescence to enable the government to make them the agents of injustice. Thoreau was motivated in part by his disgust with slavery and the Mexican-American War...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    Civil Disobedience is an essay by American transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau that was first published in 1849. In it, Thoreau argues that individuals should not permit governments to overrule or atrophy their consciences, and that they have a duty to avoid allowing such acquiescence to enable the government to make them the agents of injustice. Thoreau was motivated in part by his disgust with slavery and the Mexican–American War. Edited by Macc Kay Production executive Avalon Giuliano ICON Intern Eden Giuliano Music By AudioNautix With Their Kind Permission ©2020 Eden Garret Giuliano (P) Eden Garret Giuliano Geoffrey Giuliano is the author of over thirty internationally...read more

  • Henry David Thoreau

    O clássico de Henry David Thoreau, publicado em 1854: um manifesto a favor da natureza e da liberdade. Edição especial, com ilustrações de Deco Farkas, prefácio de Joyce Carol Oates e nota biográfica escrita por Virginia Woolf. Inclui o ensaio 'Sobre o dever da desobediência civil'. Em conflito com as mudanças trazidas pela Revolução Industrial - na sociedade, na cultura e na relação do homem com o trabalho e a natureza - e inspirado pela filosofia oriental do confucionismo, Thoreau abandona a cidade e retira-se para a floresta. Lá, às margens do lago Walden, constrói uma cabana e todos os móveis com as próprias mãos, passando a viver com o mínimo necessário para sua...read more