Searching for: "Herman Melville"

  • Herman Melville

    Herman Melville was born in New York City on August 1st, 1819, the third of eight children. At the age of 7 Melville contracted scarlet fever which was to permanently diminish his eyesight. At this time Melville was described as being "very backwards in speech and somewhat slow in comprehension."His father died when he was 12 leaving the family in very straitened times. Just 14 Melville took a job in a bank paying $150 a year that he obtained via his uncle, Peter Gansevoort, who was one of the directors of the New York State Bank.After a failed stint as a surveyor he signed on to go to sea and travelled across the Atlantic to Liverpool and then on further voyages to the Pacific on...read more

  • Herman Melville

    Herman Melville was born in New York City on 1st August 1819. At the age of 7 Melville contracted scarlet fever which permanently diminished his eyesight. Add this to a contemporary description of being "very backwards in speech and somewhat slow in comprehension" and his opportunities for success seemed limited.His father died when he was 12 leaving the family in very straitened times. 2 years later Melville took a job in a bank and followed up with a failed stint as a surveyor. He went to sea and travelled across to Liverpool and then to the Pacific on adventures which included a mutiny, being jailed and falling in love with a South Pacific beauty. He was also a figure of opposition to...read more

  • Herman Melville

    The narrator of this story is a successful lawyer on Wall Street. He hires a scrivener named Bartleby to help him with all the papers and relieve the load of work. Bartleby quickly gains the lawyer’s trust by completing his tasks on time. However, the newcomer becomes mentally unstable. He suddenly refuses to perform his duties and stares at a blank wall instead. The lawyer decides to give Bartleby a break, then tries to fire him, but the uncontrollable employee refuses to leave. Who exactly is Bartleby? Why does he refuse to perform the tasks he has been hired to do? What is his problem? How is the lawyer going to deal with the scrivener? Will Bartleby ever leave? Find all the...read more

  • Herman Melville

    Ahab is the captain of a whaling ship named the Pequod. His great obsession with the giant whale, Moby Dick, makes him embark on a dangerous voyage. Some years before, the captain lost his leg because of the whale and now Ahab’s main desire is to take his revenge on the whale by killing it. He is so obsessed, that Ahab is ready to sacrifice everything he has, including the Pequod and all the members of his crew, and even his own life. How exactly did the captain lose his leg? Is it worth it to risk everything just to have his revenge? Will Ahab survive the expedition and will he get his revenge on Moby Dick? Find all the answers in Herman Melville’s exciting novel 'Moby Dick' from...read more

  • Herman Melville

    In his ninth and final novel, cultural observer, novelist, and poet Herman Melville gives us a picture of everything wrong with America in the decade preceding the Civil War. Evoking Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, this is a story of interlocking tales from a group of steamboat passengers traveling down the Mississippi toward New Orleans. Aboard the Fidèle can be found all manner of con man, from those selling stock in failing companies and herbal cure-all "medicines" to those who are raising money for a supposed charitable organization and those who simply ask for money outright. One man sneaks aboard ship to test the so-called confidence of the passengers, and everyone is forced to...read more

  • Herman Melville

    Pierre Glendinning is the nineteen-year-old heir to the manor at Saddle Meadows in upstate New York. Engaged to the blonde Lucy Tartan in a match approved by his domineering mother, Pierre encounters the dark and mysterious Isabel Banford, who claims to be his half-sister, the illegitimate and orphaned child of his father and a European refugee. Driven by his magnetic attraction to Isabel, Pierre devises a remarkable scheme to preserve his father's name, spare his mother's grief, and give Isabel her proper share of the estate. First published in 1852, Pierre was condemned by critics of the time: "a dead failure," "this crazy rigmarole," and "a literary mare's nest." Latter-day critics,...read more

  • Herman Melville

    El gran clásico de Herman Melville en el que la caza de un cachalote se convierte en una metáfora de la condición humana. Traducción de Enrique Pezzoni Introducción de Andrew Delbanco Moby Dick, la novela que William Faulkner hubiera querido escribir, va siempre acompañada del reconocimiento y el elogio que merece toda construcción narrativa impecable. La lucha del capitán Ahab, su terrible obsesión y la mítica persecución de la enorme ballena ha traspasado fronteras, consiguiendo así la indiscutible categoría de obra maestra de la literatura universal. Esta edición cuenta con la introducción del especialista y director del Departamento de Estudios...read more

  • John Milton

    Poetry is often cited as our greatest use of words. The English language has well over a million of them and poets down the ages seem, at times, to make use of every single one. But often they use them in simple ways to describe anything and everything from landscapes to all aspects of the human condition. Poems can evoke within us an individual response that takes us by surprise; that opens our ears and eyes to very personal feelings.Forget the idea of classic poetry being somehow dull and boring and best kept to children’s textbooks. It still has life, vibrancy and relevance to our lives today. Where to start? How to do that? Poetry can be difficult. We’ve put together some very...read more

  • Herman Melville

    Herman Melville was born in New York City on 1st August 1819. At the age of 7 Melville contracted scarlet fever which permanently diminished his eyesight. Add this to a contemporary description of being "very backwards in speech and somewhat slow in comprehension" and his opportunities for success seemed limited.His father died when he was 12 leaving the family in very straitened times. 2 years later Melville took a job in a bank and followed up with a failed stint as a surveyor. He went to sea and travelled across to Liverpool and then to the Pacific on adventures which included a mutiny, being jailed and falling in love with a South Pacific beauty. He was also a figure of opposition to...read more

  • Herman Melville

    Herman Melville's tale of corporate discontent, Bartleby, the Scrivener, tells the story of a quiet, hardworking legal copyist who works in an office in the Wall Street area of New York City. The business where he works handles the official financial paperwork of wealthy men. One day, Bartleby's employer requests he proofread one of the documents he has copied. Bartleby declines the assignment with the inscrutable "I would prefer not," the first of what will become many refusals. The utterance of this remark sets off a confounding set of actions and behavior, making the unsettling character of Bartleby one of Melville's most enigmatic and unforgettable creations. "Herman Melville is one...read more

  • Herman Melville

    Penguin Classics presents Herman Melville's Moby-Dick, adapted for audio and available as a digital download as part of the Penguin English Library series. Read by the actor William Hootkins. 'The frail gunwales bent in, collapsed, and snapped, as both jaws, like an enormous shears, sliding further aft, bit the craft completely in twain...' Moby-Dick is one of the most expansive feats of imagination in the whole of literature: the mad, raging, Shakespearean tale of Captain Ahab's insane quest to kill a giant white whale that has taken his leg, and upon which he has sworn vengeance, at any cost. A creation unlike any other, this is an epic story of fatal monomania and the deepest...read more

  • Herman Melville

    With its intense mix of mystery, adventure, and a surprise ending, Benito Cereno at first seems merely a provocative example from the genre Herman Melville created with his early bestselling novels of the sea. However, most Melville scholars consider it his most sophisticated work, and many, such as novelist Ralph Ellison, have hailed it as the most piercing look at slavery in all of American literature. Based on a real life incident—the character names remain unchanged—Benito Cereno tells what happens when an American merchant ship comes upon a mysterious Spanish ship where the nearly all-black crew and their white captain are starving and yet remain hostile to offers of help....read more

  • Herman Melville

    Critically acclaimed for more than 100 years, Herman Melville's sea tale, Billy Budd, is considered to be one of the small masterpieces of American fiction. An engaging plot on the surface, the exciting yarn set in 1791 also raises profound questions about the very nature of man himself. Handsome, young Billy Budd is well-liked by the other sailors aboard the British warship, the H.M.S. Indomitable. But the ship's cruel Master-at-Arms, insanely jealous of Billy's popularity, falsely accuses Billy of fomenting mutiny. Attempting to defend himself, the young sailor strikes out-only to find himself facing an even more serious charge. His years working on whaleships enabled Herman Melville to...read more

  • Herman Melville

    The Encantadas (or Enchanted Isles), is a series of ten descriptive sketches, and a reminiscence from Melville's sailor days revealing the ecologically pristine Galapagos Islands as both enchanting and horrifying. Containing some of Melville's most memorable prose, The Encantadas were a critical success at a time when Melville's fortunes were down. After publication, the New York Dispatch cited the chapters as universally considered among the most interesting papers of that popular Magazine, and each successive chapter was read with avidity by thousands. The reviewer called the sketches a sort of mixture of 'Mardi' and 'Robinson Crusoe'--though far more interesting than the first named...read more

  • Herman Melville

    Kapitän Ahab ist besessen von seiner Jagd nach Moby Dick, den weißen Wal, der ihn zum Krüppel gemacht hat. Ein aufregendes Abenteuer auf Leben und Tod kreuz und quer durch die...read more

  • Herman Melville

    Die Jagd nach dem weißen Wal wird für Kapitän Ahab zu einer Lebensaufgabe und auch zu einem aufregenden Abenteuer auf Leben und Tod. Er ist besessen von einem einzigen Gedanken: Er will Rache üben an seinem Todfeind, Moby Dick dem riesigen weißen Wal, der ihn zum Krüppel gemacht hat. Mit seinem Walfänger durchsegelt er die sieben...read more

  • Herman Melville

    Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is an 1851 novel by American writer Herman Melville. The book is the sailor Ishmael's narrative of the obsessive quest of Ahab, captain of the whaling ship Pequod, for revenge on Moby Dick, the giant white sperm whale that on the ship's previous voyage bit off Ahab's leg at the knee. A contribution to the literature of the American Renaissance, Moby-Dick was published to mixed reviews, was a commercial failure, and was out of print at the time of the author's death in 1891. Its reputation as a Great American Novel was established only in the 20th century, after the centennial of its author's birth. William Faulkner said he wished he had...read more

  • Herman Melville

    'Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street' is a short story by the American writer Herman Melville, first serialized anonymously in two parts in the November and December 1853 issues of Putnam's Magazine, and reprinted with minor textual alterations in his The Piazza Tales in 1856. In the story, a Wall Street lawyer hires a new clerk who, after an initial bout of hard work, refuses to make copies or do any other task required of him, with the words, 'I would prefer not to'. The narrator is an elderly, unnamed Manhattan lawyer with a comfortable business in legal documents. He already employs two scriveners, Nippers and Turkey, to copy legal documents by hand, but an increase in...read more

  • Herman Melville

    Representing the dark underbelly of Romanticism and beyond, these stories reach the shadowy corners of the human soul as seen through the writings of some of the most prominent authors of the 19th and early 20th...read more

  • Herman Melville

    Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street is a novella by the American novelist Herman Melville (1819–1891). It first appeared anonymously in two parts in the November and December 1853 editions of Putnam's Magazine, and was reprinted with minor textual alterations in his The Piazza Tales in 1856. Among Melville's best-known works are Moby-Dick; Typee , a romanticized account of his experiences in Polynesia; and Billy Budd, Sailor, a posthumously published novella. Although his reputation was not high at the time of his death, the 1919 centennial of his birth was the starting point of a Melville revival, and Moby-Dick grew to be considered one of the great American...read more