Searching for: "Hilaire Belloc"

  • Hilaire Belloc

    These humorous verses were originally written for children but the taste is much more to an adult liking. They are strange, perverse, and the morals they provide....well, that's for you to decide. Luckily Joyce Grenfell is narrating, so it's double the experience. Here's what you can look forward to hearing: 'Algernon, Who Played with a Loaded Gun, and, on Missing His Sister, Was Reprimanded by His Father'; 'The Example'; 'About John, Who Lost a Fortune by Throwing Stones'; 'Jim, Who Ran Away from His Nurse, and Was Eaten by a Lion'; 'Maria, Who Made Faces and a Deplorable Marriage'; 'Henry King, Who Chewed Bits of String, and Was Early Cut Off in Dreadful Agonies'; 'Charles Augustus...read more

  • Hilaire Belloc

    A clear boundary exists between the servile and the non-servile condition of labour, and the conditions upon either side of that boundary utterly differ one from another, Where there is compulsion applicable by positive law to men of a certain status, such compulsion enforced in the last resort by the powers at the disposal of the State, there is the institution of Slavery; and if that institution be sufficiently expanded the whole State may be said to repose upon a servile basis, and is a Servile State. (Hilaire...read more

  • Hilaire Belloc

    The Catholic brings to history (when I say "history" in these pages I mean the history of Christendom) self-knowledge. As a man in the confessional accuses himself of what he knows to be true and what other people cannot judge, so a Catholic, talking of the united European civilization, when he blames it, blames it for motives and for acts which are his own. He himself could have done those things in person. He is not relatively right in his blame, he is absolutely right. As a man can testify to his own motive so can the Catholic testify to unjust, irrelevant, or ignorant conceptions of the European story; for he knows why and how it proceeded. Others, not Catholic, look upon the story of...read more

  • Hilaire Belloc

    “When a man weighs anchor in a little ship or a large one he does a jolly thing! He cuts himself off and he starts for freedom and for the chance of things. He pulls the jib a-weather, he leans to her slowly pulling round, he sees the wind getting into the mainsail, and he feels that she feels the helm. He has her on a slant of the wind, and he makes out between the harbour piers.” (quotation from Hilaire...read more

  • Hilaire Belloc

    I propose to discuss in what follows the evil of the great modern Capitalist Press, its function in vitiating and misinforming opinion and in putting power into ignoble hands; its correction by the formation of small independent organs, and the probably increasing effect of these last. (Introduction by Hilaire...read more

  • Hilaire Belloc

    “It is, for that matter, self-evident that if one community decides in one fashion, another, also sovereign, in the opposite fashion, both cannot be right. Reasoning men have also protested, and justly, against the conception that what a majority in numbers, or even (what is more compelling still) a unanimity of decision in a community may order, may not only be wrong but may be something which that community has no authority to order since, though it possesses a civil and temporal authority, it acts against that ultimate authority which is its own consciousness of right. Men may and do justly protest against the doctrine that a community is incapable of doing deliberate evil; it is as...read more

  • Hilaire Belloc

    Long before I knew that the speech of men was misused by them and that they lied in the hearing of the gods perpetually in those early days through which all men have passed, during which one believes what one is told, an old and crusty woman of great wealth, to whom I was describing what I intended to do with life (which in those days seemed to me of infinite duration), said to me, (You are building castles in Spain.' I was too much in awe of this woman not on account of the wealth, but on account of the crust to go further into the matter, but it seemed to me a very foolish thing to say, for I had never been to Spain, and I had nothing wherewith to build a castle and indeed such a project...read more

  • Hilaire Belloc

    “I knew a man once, Maurice, who was at Oxford for three years, and after that went down with no degree. At College, while his friends were seeking for Truth in funny brown German Philosophies, Sham Religions, stinking bottles and identical equations, he was lying on his back in Eynsham meadows thinking of Nothing, and got the Truth by this parallel road of his much more quickly than did they by theirs; for the asses are still seeking, mildly disputing, and, in a cultivated manner, following the gleam, so that they have become in their Donnish middleage a nuisance and a pest; while he--that other--with the Truth very fast and firm at the end of a leather thong is dragging her sliding,...read more

  • Hilaire Belloc

    “Now that story is a symbol, and tells the truth. We see some one thing in this world, and suddenly it becomes particular and sacramental; a woman and a child, a man at evening, a troop of soldiers; we hear notes of music, we smell the smell that went with a passed time, or we discover after the long night a shaft of light upon the tops of the hills at morning: there is a resurrection, and we are refreshed and renewed.” - Hilaire...read more

  • Hilaire Belloc

    “When Fame comes upon a man well before death then must he most particularly beware of it, for is it then most dangerous. Neither must he, having achieved it, relax effort nor (a much greater peril) think he has done his work because some Fame now attaches thereto.” -- Hilaire...read more

  • Hilaire Belloc

    A clear boundary exists between the servile and the non-servile condition of labour, and the conditions upon either side of that boundary utterly differ one from another, Where there is compulsion applicable by positive law to men of a certain status, such compulsion enforced in the last resort by the powers at the disposal of the State, there is the institution of Slavery ; and if that institution be sufficiently expanded the whole State may be said to repose upon a servile basis, and is a Servile State. (Hilaire...read more

  • Hilaire Belloc

    I propose to discuss in what follows the evil of the great modern Capitalist Press, its function in vitiating and misinforming opinion and in putting power into ignoble hands; its correction by the formation of small independent organs, and the probably increasing effect of these last. (Introduction by Hilaire...read more

  • Hilaire Belloc

    A collection of poetry by Hilaire Belloc ranging from religious verses to drinking...read more

  • Hilaire Belloc

    This book of thirteen silly rhymes about strange animals is sure to delight and confuzzle its young listeners. 'More Beasts for Worse Children', a collection nonsense verse for children, was written by English-French writer, historian and satirist, Hilaire Belloc (1870-1953). Poems in order: 1. More Beasts for Worse Children - Introduction 2. The Python 3. The Welsh Mutton 4. The Porcupine 5. The Scorpion 6. The Crocodile 7. The Vulture 8. The Bison 9. The Viper 10. The Llama 11. The Chamois 12. The Frozen Mammoth 13. The...read more