Searching for: "Jack London"

  • Jack London

    During the great depression year of 1893 (the worst in the history of the United States until then), when he was only seventeen, Jack London (1876-1916) joined the nation-wide protest movement known as Kelly’s Army to march from San Francisco to Washington with thousands of others. He spent an entire year on the road, an experience which he summarized in his autobiographical memoir Jack London, by Himself as follows: “I tramped all through the United States, from California to Boston, and up and down, returning to the Pacific Coast by way of Canada, where I got into jail and served a term for vagrancy, and the whole tramping experience made me become a...read more

  • Jack London

    Sixty years ago, a plague wiped out mankind and only a handful of people managed to survive. The survivors established their own civilization and rules in the wild and destructed world. Now, sixty years later, an old man named James Howard Smith walks together with a young boy through the desert. The two travelers walk along an old and long forgotten railway track with an important mission, a mission that can change the life of all the survivors. What was this plague and where did it come from? How did some of the people manage to survive? What is James Smith’s mission, and can he accomplish it? How can a single man change the fate of humanity? Find all the answers in Jack London’s...read more

  • Jack London

    Unter strikter Einhaltung des Reinheitsgebots haben wir eine Sammlung der schönsten Geschichten über das 'flüssige Brot' zusammengebraut. Herausgekommen ist dabei ein sehr kurzweiliges und humorvolles Gebräu. Jack London berichtet über seine ersten Erfahrungen mit Bier (Der erste Krug Bier) und Stefan Lochner widmet sich der Frage ob Biertrinker ebenso leidenschaftliche Genussmenschen sind wie Weintrinker (Biergenuss). Die beiden Bestsellerautoren Ralf Kramp und Günther Thömmes nähern sich der Braukunst auf kriminalistische Weise (Der Warstein-Code und Das Quellausmassaker). Es wird also spannend, denn für wahre Gaumenfreuden ist so manch einer bereit, bis zum Äußersten zu...read more

  • Jack London

    'King' Wallace is a lion-tamer, who has been viciously murdered by a man who hated him. Now everyone wants to know who the murderer is. The 'Leopard Man' is a leopard trainer with mysterious scars on his arms. He finds out that the murderer attended every performance of the lion-tamer in hope of seeing the lion tear his trainer apart. Who is the murderer and why did he hate the lion trainer so much? Who does the 'Leopard Man' suspect and will he be able to reveal the truth? What will happen to the murderer at the end of this mystery story? Find the answers in Jack London's short story 'The Leopard Man's Story' published in 1903. B. J. Harrison started his Classic Tales Podcast back...read more

  • Jack London

    Buck is a 140-pound dog, a mix of St. Bernard and sheepdog, and lives in Santa Clara Valley with his owner, Judge Miller. However, Buck's happy and comfortable life comes to an end when he is kidnapped from Miller's estate and forced to pull sleds in the Klondike region of Canada. The poor dog does not want to obey his new owner and as a result he is beaten and tortured. After Buck arrives in the cold North, he meets another dog named Curly, that is mercilessly killed by a pack of huskies. Who kidnapped Buck and how could Miller let this happen? Will Buck learn to obey his new master or will he try to escape? Can he survive the hard life int he Klondike? Find all the answers in Jack...read more

  • Jack London

    A man travels through the frozen wasteland bordering the Yukon River, accompanied by his best friend - a large husky dog. The dog tries to dissuade the man from walking farther into the frozen land, but the man pushes on. At some point the man decides to stop and build a fire. Unfortunately, snow falls from one of the trees and extinguishes the fire. This is the moment where the problems truly begin. Why is the man travelling through the Canadian frozen lands? Where is he heading to? Will he manage to restart the fire? Will he and his friend survive in the harsh weather? Find all the answers in Jack London's short story 'To Build a Fire' from 1908. B. J. Harrison started his Classic...read more

  • Jack London

    Edith Whittlesey is born in a country district of England, where life flows as per the rule of thumb. She is married to an honest and hardworking miner, who works together with four other men. Usually no unexpected things happen, but one day it all changes. One of the miners bursts into the hut where his partners are sitting together with Edith. The man kills two of them but is stopped and tied up thanks to Whittlesey's quick reaction. Why did the miner tried to kill his partners? Is it because of the gold they have gathered? Or is it a reason? What are the survivors going to do with the murderer? Is Edith's husband going to kill him? Find all the answers in Jack London's short story...read more

  • Kate Chopin

    'When you read (or listen to) a short story, you come out a little more aware and a little more in love with the world around you.' ~ George Saunders Here you will find 50 of the greatest public-domain short stories ever written, as curated by the staff of The Bookquarium, all performed by Frank Marcopolos. ('Thee perfect voice for audiobooks--it is so listenable!' said one reviewer.) Some of the greatest writers in history are included in this collection--Ernest Hemingway, Ayn Rand, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jack London, William Faulkner, Kate Chopin, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., Stephen Crane, H.P. Lovecraft, Willa Cather, and Edgar Allan Poe among them. Frank...read more

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald

    Ten superbly narrated stories that help explain America by America's best writers. Irving's incredible and amusing tale of the archetypal 'Rip Van Winkle' relates the story of a man who slept through history. Stephen Crane's 'The Red Badge of Courage' tells of a young soldier who must struggle with his conscience no matter what the consequences. 'The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County' is Mark Twain's hilarious story of a contest to end all contests in the rowdy days of the Forty-Niners. Edgar Allan Poe's 'The Man of the Crowd' tells of one man's strange fascination with another. 'The Ransom of Red Chief' is another of O. Henry's tales of a kidnapping that goes horribly, horribly,...read more

  • Jack London

    The Valley of the Moon (1913) is a novel by American writer Jack London. The valley where it is set is located north of the San Francisco Bay Area in Sonoma County, California where Jack London was a resident; he built his ranch in Glen Ellen. A road novel 50 years before Kerouac, The Valley of the Moon traces the odyssey of Billy and Saxon Roberts from the labor strife of Oakland at the turn of the century through central and northern California in search of beautiful land they can farm...read more

  • Jack London

    The Call of the Wild is an adventure novel by Jack London. It was published in 1903 and set in Yukon, Canada during the 1890s Klondike Gold Rush, when strong sled dogs were in high demand. The central character of the novel is a dog named Buck. The story opens at a ranch in Santa Clara Valley, California, when Buck is stolen from his home and sold into service as a sled dog in Alaska. He becomes progressively feral in the harsh environment, where he is forced to fight to survive and dominate other dogs. By the end, he sheds the veneer of civilization, and relies on primordial instinct and learned experience to emerge as a leader in the wild. Artist Bio Author: Jack London (1876-1916)...read more

  • Jack London

    White Fang is the story of a wild dog's journey toward becoming civilized in the Canadian territory of Yukon during the Klondike gold rush at the end of the nineteenth century. White Fang is a companion novel (and a thematic mirror) to Jack London's best-known work, The Call of the Wild, which concerns a kidnapped civilized dog turning into a wild wolf. The book is characteristic of London's precise prose style and his innovative use of voice and perspective. Much of the novel is written from the viewpoint of the animals, allowing London to explore how animals view their world and how they view humans. White Fang examines the violent world of wild animals and the equally violent world of...read more

  • Jack London

    The Call of the Wild is a novel by American author Jack London published in 1903. The story is set in the Yukon during the 1890s Klondike Gold Rush-a period when strong sled dogs were in high demand. The novel's central character is a dog named Buck, a domesticated dog living at a ranch in California as the story opens. Stolen from his home and sold into the brutal existence of an Alaskan sled dog, he reverts to atavistic traits. Buck is forced to adjust to, and survive, cruel treatments and fight to dominate other dogs in a harsh climate. Eventually he sheds the veneer of civilization, relying on primordial instincts and lessons he learns, to emerge as a leader in the wild. London lived...read more

  • Jack London

    Jack London was quoted as saying, "I've never written a line that I'd be ashamed for my young daughters to read, and I never shall write such a line!" After his death in 1916, his wife Charmian assembled a collection of stories, most of which he had written for young readers, but at least one of which was for more mature readers, "Whose Business is to Live." Like most of London's work, his short stories could be read by young readers and then again when they were older with mature minds. These stories draw from London's own extensive experience in the world and demonstrate the dictum that "good writing is good writing" no matter for whom it was written. - Summary by Don W....read more

  • Jack London

    The Call of the Wild is a short adventure novel by Jack London. The central character of the novel is a dog named Buck. The story opens at a ranch in Santa Clara Valley, California, when Buck is stolen from his home and sold into service as a sled dog in Alaska. He becomes progressively feral in the harsh environment, where he is forced to fight to survive and dominate other dogs. By the end, he sheds the veneer of civilization, and relies on primordial instinct and learned experience to emerge as a leader in the wild. The Call of the Wild was enormously popular from the moment it was published. H. L. Menken wrote of London's story: 'No other popular writer of his time did any better...read more

  • Jack London

    Buck, a huge four-year-old Scottish Shepherd-Saint Bernard cross-breed, lived a life of ease at Judge Miller's Santa Clara Valley estate. This is the story of Buck and how he was thrust into the life of a sled-dog in the savage Klondike during the Gold Rush, and how he ran with the wolves. Jack London, born in San Francisco on January 12, 1876, is well known for his stories involving men and animals and their struggles in the environment. Being an illegitimate child, he adopted his stepfather's surname. London had an adventurous life which included being an oyster pirate, a laundromat worker, a seaman and a participating in the 1897-98 Alaskan Gold Rush. His personal life...read more

  • Jack London

    When White Fang was first published in 1906, Jack London was well on his way to becoming one of the most famous, popular, and highly paid writers in the world. White Fang stands out as one of his finest achievements, a spellbinding novel of life in the northern wilds. In gripping detail, London bares the savage realities of the battle for survival among all species in a harsh, unyielding environment. White Fang is part wolf, part dog, a ferocious and magnificent creature through whose experiences we see and feel essential rhythms and patterns of life in the animal kingdom and among mankind as well. It is, above all, a novel that keenly observes the extraordinary working of one of nature's...read more

  • Jack London

    When White Fang was first published in 1906, Jack London was well on his way to becoming one of the most famous, popular, and highly paid writers in the world. White Fang stands out as one of his finest achievements, a spellbinding novel of life in the northern wilds. In gripping detail, London bares the savage realities of the battle for survival among all species in a harsh, unyielding environment. White Fang is part wolf, part dog, a ferocious and magnificent creature through whose experiences we see and feel essential rhythms and patterns of life in the animal kingdom and among mankind as well. It is, above all, a novel that keenly observes the extraordinary working of one of nature's...read more

  • Jack London

    Jack London died at the age of forty. In this autobiographical work, London describes his life as seen through the eyes of John Barleycorn (alcohol). There is much controversy about the cause of his death just as there is about alcoholism and addiction. London's brutally frank and honest analysis of his own struggles and bouts with alcohol was way before its time and more modern theories of addiction. With remarkable candor and insight, London describes the demons and gods he encountered through both friend and enemy, John...read more

  • Jack London

    Jack London died at the age of forty. In this autobiographical work, London describes his life as seen through the eyes of John Barleycorn (alcohol). There is much controversy about the cause of his death just as there is about alcoholism and addiction. London's brutally frank and honest analysis of his own struggles and bouts with alcohol was way before its time and more modern theories of addiction. With remarkable candor and insight, London describes the demons and gods he encountered through both friend and enemy, John...read more