Searching for: "Jack London"

  • Jack London

    The People of the Abyss (1903) is a book by Jack London about life in the East End of London in 1902. He wrote this first-hand account after living in the East End (including the Whitechapel District) for several months, sometimes staying in workhouses or sleeping on the streets. The conditions he experienced and wrote about, were the same as those endured by an estimated 500,000 of the contemporary London...read more

  • Jack London

    White Fang is a novel by American author Jack London (1876–1916) — and the name of the book's eponymous character, a wild wolfdog. First serialized in Outing magazine, it was published in 1906. The story details White Fang's journey to domestication in Yukon Territory and the Northwest Territories during the 1890s Klondike Gold Rush. It is a companion novel (and a thematic mirror) to London's best-known work, The Call of the Wild (1903), which is about a kidnapped, domesticated dog embracing his wild ancestry to survive and thrive in the wild. Much of White Fang is written from the viewpoint of the titular canine character, enabling London to explore how animals view...read more

  • Jack London

    'To Build a Fire,' the best-known of Jack London's many short stories, tells the tale of a solitary traveler on the Yukon Trail accompanied only by his dog as they endure the extreme cold. A classic narrative of a battle for survival against the forces of nature, 'To Build a Fire' is London at his best. Also included here are 'The Red One,' 'All Gold Canyon,' 'A Piece of Steak,' 'The Love of Life,' 'Flush of Gold,' 'The Story of Keesh,' and 'The Wisdom of the Trail.' A vital collection of works by one of the greatest short-story writers in American literature, this edition is sure to delight audiences of all...read more

  • Jack London

    Life has lost its savor for Mr. Pathurst. New York, fame, women, and the arts have all become tedious. Searching for excitement, he books passage on a cargo vessel sailing from Baltimore to Seattle on a route that travels around the treacherous Cape Horn. Pathurst encounters more than he ever expected in rough seas, turbulent storms, and a mutinous crew. His epic struggles aboard the sailing ship Elsinore have given him a new love for life, but will he survive to profit from it? Everyone who remembers The Sea Wolf with pleasure will enjoy this vigorous narrative. The Mutiny of the Elsinore is the same kind of tale as its famous predecessor, and it has been pronounced even more stirring by...read more

  • Jack London

    The author of such masterpieces as The Call of the Wild and White Fang, Jack London is one of American literature's most revered writers. In this semi-autobiographical tale, London tells the story of Martin Eden, a young sailor who, through self-education and determination, rises out of poverty to passionately pursue a dream of literary and intellectual achievement. But soon he discovers a life of success is not what he hoped it would...read more

  • Jack London

    The phrase ‘this book will change your life’ has become one of the clichés of the publishing world but ‘Martin Eden’ is certainly a novel that merits that observation. Set in turn of the century San Francisco, Jack London’s semi-autobiographical narrative tells of working class sailor Eden’s struggle to elevate himself to a level of society wherein, he believes, resides the intellect and culture he craves. One of the reasons for this endeavour is Ruth Morse, with whom he has fallen in love, and whose bourgeois family make a union between them impossible until he obtains an equality of wealth and status.However, Martin’s inexorable and painful quest changes him and he...read more

  • Jack London

    Jack London was one of the first fiction writers to achieveworldwide fame. Though he is best remembered for his novels The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set during the KlondikeGold Rush, his short stories are considered masterful. Here in "Brown Wolf," acouple living on a homestead in Northern California who take in a stray sled dog from Alaska. A story about the relationship between man and animal, "Brown Wolf" is among London's finest shorter works. Proceeds from sale of this title go to Reach Out and Read, an innovative literacy advocacy...read more

  • Jack London

    Jack London lived for a time within the grim and grimy world of the East End of London, where half a million people scraped together hardly enough on which to survive. Even if they were able to work, they were paid only enough to allow them a pitiful existence. He grew to know and empathise with these forgotten (or ignored) people as he spoke with them and tasted the workhouse, life on the streets, … and the food, which was cheap, barely nutritious, and foul. He writes about his experiences in a fluid and narrative style, making it very clear what he thinks of the social structures which created the Abyss, and of the millionaires who live high on the labours of a people forced to live...read more

  • Jack London

    1. "In order to face the constant danger of hurt and even of destruction...he became quicker of movement than the other dogs...more ferocious, and more intelligent. He had to become all these things, else he would not have held his own nor survived".So writes Jack London of White Fang, the title character in one of his most well-known books. Through London's tale, the listener will come to know the intriguing life of a wolf-dog from his birth in the wilds of arctic Yukon Territory to his end of days as a resident of a California estate. White Fang's story is marked by themes of determination, will to survive, and redemption, and has been enjoyed by generations of readers since it was...read more

  • Jack London

    John Griffith "Jack" London was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone. Some of his most famous works include The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire," "An Odyssey of the North," and "Love of Life." He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen," and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf. London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the...read more

  • Jack London

    The Cruise of the Snark (1913) is a memoir of Jack and Charmian London's 1907-1909 voyage across the Pacific. His descriptions of "surf-riding", which he dubbed a "royal sport", helped introduce it to and popularize it with the mainland. London writes: Through the white crest of a breaker suddenly appears a dark figure, erect, a man-fish or a sea-god, on the very forward face of the crest where the top falls over and down, driving in toward shore, buried to his loins in smoking spray, caught up by the sea and flung landward, bodily, a quarter of a mile. It is a Kanaka on a surf-board. And I know that when I have finished these lines I shall be out in that riot of colour and pounding surf,...read more

  • Jack London

    Jack London lived for a time within the grim and grimy world of the East End of London, where half a million people scraped together hardly enough on which to survive. Even if they were able to work, they were paid only enough to allow them a pitiful existence. He grew to know and empathise with these forgotten (or ignored) people as he spoke with them and tasted the workhouse, life on the streets, ... and the food, which was cheap, barely nutritious, and foul. He writes about his experiences in a fluid and narrative style, making it very clear what he thinks of the social structures which created the Abyss, and of the millionaires who live high on the labours of a people forced to live...read more

  • Jack London

    Known mainly for his tales of adventure, this work of science fiction by Jack London is set in a post-apocalyptic future. It's 2072, sixty years after the scarlet plague has depopulated the planet. James Howard Smith is one of the few survivors of the pre-plague era left alive in the San Francisco area, and as he realizes his time grows short, he tries to impart the value of knowledge and wisdom to his grandsons. Through his narrative, we learn how the plague spread throughout the world and of the struggles of the handful of survivors it left in its wake. The Scarlet Plague was originally published in London Magazine in 1912. (Summary by Wikipedia and James...read more

  • Jack London

    Jack London's novels and ruggedly individual life seemed to embody American hopes, frustrations, and romantic longings in the turbulent first years of the twentieth century, years infused with the wonder and excitement of great technological and historic change. The author's restless spirit, taste for a life of excitement, and probing mind led him on a series of hard-edged adventures from the Klondike to the South Seas. Out of these sometimes harrowing experiences - and his fascination with the theories of such thinkers as Darwin, Spencer, and Marx - came the inspiration for novels of adventure that would make him one of America's most popular writers. The Call of the Wild, considered by...read more

  • Jack London

    The Call of the Wild is a novel by Jack London published in 1903. The story is set in the Yukon during the 1890s Klondike Gold Rush-a period in which strong sled dogs were in high demand. The novel's central character is a dog named Buck, a domesticated dog living at a ranch in the Santa Clara Valley of California as the story opens. Stolen from his home and sold into service as sled dog in Alaska, he reverts to a wild state. Buck is forced to fight in order to dominate other dogs in a harsh climate. Eventually he sheds the veneer of civilization, relying on primordial instincts and learned experience to emerge as a leader in the wild. The terrible, never relenting work of pulling sleds in...read more

  • Jack London

    White Fang is the titular character and a novel by American author Jack London. First serialized in Outing magazine, it was published in 1906. The story takes place in Yukon Territory, Canada, during the Klondike Gold Rush at the end of the 19th-century, and details a wild wolfdog's journey to domestication. White Fang is a companion novel (and a thematic mirror) to London's best-known work, The Call of the Wild, which is about a kidnapped, domesticated dog embracing his wild ancestry to survive and thrive in the wild. Much of White Fang is written from the viewpoint of the titular canine character, enabling London to explore how animals view their world and how they view humans. White Fang...read more

  • Jack London

    This collection of Jack London's short stories touches on a variety of topics, from his love of boxing, to relationships between criminals, to the trials of life and travel on many frontiers, to an allegory about a king who desired a nose. London is considered a master of the short story, a form much more to his liking and personality than his novels. He was active and quick of mind and the short story suited him well. - Summary by Don W....read more

  • Jack London

    A collection of three heartwarming storiesabout man's best friend Dollypogs The gentle story of a Labrador puppy, Dollypogs, and her twopals, big old Jetset and little Snuggles, both adopted by Dollypog's lovingmaster, David Thorn. A very sweet and touching story about how they all cametogether and their adventures as a loving family. Brown Wolf Jack London was one of the first fiction writers to achieveworldwide fame. Though he is best remembered for his novels The Call of theWild and White Fang, both set during the Klondike Gold Rush, his short storiesare considered masterful. Here in "Brown Wolf," a couple living on a homesteadin Northern California who take in a stray sled dog from...read more

  • Jack London

    Known mainly for his tales of adventure, this work of science fiction by Jack London is set in a post-apocalyptic future. It's 2072, sixty years after the scarlet plague has depopulated the planet. James Howard Smith is one of the few survivors of the pre-plague era left alive in the San Francisco area, and as he realizes his time grows short, he tries to impart the value of knowledge and wisdom to his grandsons. Through his narrative, we learn how the plague spread throughout the world and of the struggles of the handful of survivors it left in its wake. The Scarlet Plague was originally published in London Magazine in...read more

  • Jack London

    Known mainly for his tales of adventure, this work of science fiction by Jack London is set in a post-apocalyptic future. It's 2072, sixty years after the scarlet plague has depopulated the planet. James Howard Smith is one of the few survivors of the pre-plague era left alive in the San Francisco area, and as he realizes his time grows short, he tries to impart the value of knowledge and wisdom to his grandsons. Through his narrative, we learn how the plague spread throughout the world and of the struggles of the handful of survivors it left in its wake. The Scarlet Plague was originally published in London Magazine in...read more