Searching for: "James Madison"

  • James Madison

    James Madison's first and greatest contribution to the work that would become known as the Federalist Papers. In #10 Madison turns on its head the centuries old maxim that representative government could survive only in small...read more

  • James Madison

    The Federalist Papers are a collection of eighty-five articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay in favor of ratifying the United States Constitution. First appearing in 1787 as a series of letters to New York newspapers, this collective body of work is widely considered to be among the most important historical collections of all time. Although the authors of The Federalist Papers foremost intended to influence the vote in favor of ratifying the Constitution, in Federalist No. 1 Hamilton explicitly set their debate in broader political terms. “It has been frequently remarked,” he wrote, “that it seems to have been reserved to the people of this...read more

  • James Madison

    Constitution includes the timeline from the founding of the American colonies to the Constitution, drafting & ratification, James Madison-the primary author, historical influences, reading of Constitution & Amendments, as well as more data. The Constitution, along with the Declaration of Independence & the Bill of Rights, were the core documents for the new American Republic as well as America today.Few have read or heard the Constitution. That step alone makes this audiobook a treasure. Most listeners are surprised by how concise the Constitution is, much more so than most legal documents today.Part of the Getting A's series according to many listeners. Listen to this and score high in...read more

  • James Madison

    The U.S. Constitution was approved by the Constitutional Convention on September 17, 1787. It was to become law only if it was ratified by nine of the thirteen states. New York was a key state, but it contained strong forces opposing the Constitution. A series of eighty-five letters appeared in New York City newspapers between October 1787 and August 1788 urging support for the Constitution. These letters remain the first and most authoritative commentary on the American concept of federal government. Later known as The Federalist Papers, they were published under the pseudonym 'Publius,' although written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay. 'The Federalist Papers stand...read more

  • James Madison

    The Bill of Rights was created after the Constitution was ratified in order to protect the citizens from instrusions on their liberty by laws, the government, and others. Almost unique in the world to have such protections on an irrevocable basis. Most countries have a Constitution but few a Bill of Rights that can't be modified by government decree. The Federalists or proponents of a strong Federal system promised they would do this and did so. The anti-federalists, as they were known, led by people such as Thomas Jefferson, feared too much central authority as proposed by the Federalists, led by John Adams among others. The Bill of Rights was the protection of liberty sought by the...read more

  • James Madison

    The Bill of Rights are the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution, and were ratified on December 15,...read more

  • James Madison

    Originally published anonymously, The Federalist Papers first appeared in 1787 as a series of letters to New York newspapers exhorting voters to ratify the proposed Constitution of the United States. Still hotly debated and open to often controversial interpretations, the arguments first presented here by three of America's greatest patriots and political theorists were created during a critical moment in our nation's history, providing readers with a running ideological commentary on the crucial issues facing a democracy. Today, The Federalist Papers are as important and vital a rallying cry for freedom as...read more

  • James Madison

    The Federalist Papers (correctly known as The Federalist) are a series of 85 articles advocating the ratification of the United States Constitution. Seventy-seven of the essays were published serially in The Independent Journal and The New York Packet between October 1787 and August 1788 . A compilation of these and eight others, called The Federalist, was published in 1788 by J. and A....read more

  • Thomas Jefferson

    La Declaración de Independencia es uno de los documentos más importantes en la historia de los Estados Unidos. Fue un acto oficial tomado por las 13 colonias americanas al declarar su independencia del dominio británico. ... La guerra entre las colonias y Gran Bretaña se llamó Guerra Revolucionaria Americana (1775-1783). La Constitución de los Estados Unidos es la ley suprema de los Estados Unidos de América. Fue adoptada en su forma original el 17 de septiembre de 1787 por la Convención Constitucional de Filadelfia (Pensilvania) y luego ratificada por el pueblo en convenciones en cada estado en el nombre de «Nosotros el Pueblo» (We the People).​ La Constitución tiene un lugar...read more