Searching for: "Jonathan Swift"

  • Jonathan Swift

    Penguin Classics presents Jonathan Swift's inventive classic, Gulliver's Travels, adapted for audio and now available as a digital download as part of the Penguin English Library series. Read by Hugh Laurie, star of the hit TV series House. 'Fifteen hundred of the Emperor's largest horses, each about four inches and an half high, were employed to draw me towards the Metropolis, which, as I said, was half a Mile distant' A savage and hilarious satire, Gulliver's Travels sees Lemuel Gulliver shipwrecked and adrift, subject to bizarre and unnerving encounters with, among others, quarrelling Lilliputians, philosophising horses and the brutish Yahoo tribe, that change his view of humanity...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Set and written in 1726, This is a marvelously imaginative tale of the four voyages of Lemuel Gulliver. He finds himself shipwrecked and the prisoner of captors ranging in size from 6 inches tall to 60 feet tall and of various other persuasions. But this is just the beginning of a story written, strangely enough to satirize the foolishness and vices of modern men as they were perceived at the time. No one, young or old, can ever forget the Lilliputians and the Yahoos that starred in these wonderful and riveting stories of long ago. AUTHOR Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) was an Irish novelist, satirist, poet and political essayist. From a very literary family, his uncle married the daughter...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Travelers visit many strange places. They see very many wonderful things. When they return home they tell wonderful stories about what they have seen. Thus begin the words of Jonathan Swift’s immortal Lemuel Gulliver in his witty masterpiece, Gulliver’s Travels. Retold for the modern young reader while retaining all of the tongue-in-cheek charm and political satire of the original classic, the adventures of the keenly observant Gulliver in Lilliput and Brobdingnag are certain to enchant a whole new generation of...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    'I felt something alive moving on my left leg ... when bending my Eyes downwards as much as I could. I perceived it to be a human Creature not six inches high'  Shipwrecked and cast adrift, Lemuel Gulliver wakes to find himself on Lilliput, an island inhabited by little people, whose height makes their quarrels over fashion and fame seem ridiculous. His subsequent encounters - with the crude giants of Brobdingnag, the philosophical Houyhnhnm's and the brutish Yahoos - give Gulliver new, bitter insights into human behavior. Swift's savage satire view mankind in a distorted hall of mirrors as a diminished, magnified and finally bestial species, presenting us with an uncompromising...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Experience one of the most jarring and influential satirical essays in this InAudio production of A Modest Proposalby Jonathan Swift.In one of the most well-known works of satire, Jonathan Swift puts forth a “modest proposal.” Swift begins by outlining the suffering that the starving beggars in Ireland experience daily. He paints a grim picture of the plight these people face to help the reader relate to the situation, before turning the tables and suggesting that to alleviate the economic troubles of the poor, their children could be sold as food to the upper class. The shock from this sudden change is expounded by Swift’s continued explanation of the proposal, including cooking...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    In 'A Modest Proposal,' first published in 1729, Jonathan Swift heaps scorn on then-current political theory and reveals the appalling suffering taking place in Ireland - not through direct reporting, but through mock suggestions on what to do with the poor; they should sell their children for food. 'The chief end I propose to myself in all my labors is to vex the world rather than divert it,' wrote Jonathan Swift in a letter to his friend Alexander Pope. Other vexing works collected here are 'Directions to Servants,' 'The Art of Political Lying,' 'A Digression Concerning the Critics,' and 'Sweetness and...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    A Tale of a Tub was the first major work written by Jonathan Swift, composed between 1694 and 1697, that was eventually published in 1704. It is arguably his most difficult satire, and perhaps his most masterly. The Tale is a prose parody which is divided into sections of "digression" and a "tale" of three brothers, each representing one of the main branches of western Christianity. A Tale was long regarded as a satire on religion itself, and has famously been attacked for that, starting with William Wotton. The "tale" presents a consistent satire of religious excess, while the digressions are a series of parodies of contemporary writing in literature, politics, theology, Biblical exegesis,...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Shipwrecked and cast adrift, Lemuel Gulliver wakes to find himself on Lilliput, an island inhabited by little people whose height makes their quarrels over fashion and fame seem ridiculous. His subsequent encounters with the crude giants of Brobdingnag, the philosophical Houyhnhnms, and the brutish Yahoos give him further insight into human behavior. Presented through Swift's satiric hall of distorting mirrors, mankind is cast as diminished, magnified, and bestial-the composite of which is an uncompromising reflection of human...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Jonathan Swift almost defines satire in this biting and brutal pamphlet in which he suggests that poor (Catholic) Irish families should fatten up their children and sell them to the rich (Protestant) land owners, thus solving the twin problems of starving children and poverty in one blow. When the "Proposal" was published in 1729, Swift was quickly attacked, and even accused of barbarity - the exact state the "Proposal" was written to expose. (Summary by...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift is a wild series of adventures widely acclaimed as "universally read" and highly influential. After a shipwreck, an Englishman discovers new, strange lands, and learns of the customs and governments of their inhabitants. This is an opportunity both for absurd humor and political satire, and the story of Lilliput may be the best example of Swift's imagination and wit. Gulliver finds himself a prisoner of a race of tiny people, the Lilliputians; they are no more than 6 inches tall, and he appears a giant to them. Soon afterwards, the spectacular giant becomes a favorite of the court, and is given a good view of the politics of the kingdom. Discover the...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift is a wild series of adventures widely acclaimed as "universally read" and highly influential. After a shipwreck, an Englishman discovers new, strange lands, and learns of the customs and governments of their inhabitants. This is an opportunity both for absurd humor and political satire, and the story of Lilliput may be the best example of Swift's imagination and wit. Gulliver finds himself a prisoner of a race of tiny people, the Lilliputians; they are no more than 6 inches tall, and he appears a giant to them. Soon afterwards, the spectacular giant becomes a favorite of the court, and is given a good view of the politics of the kingdom. Discover the...read more

  • Dr. Jonathan Swift

    A Modest Proposal for Preventing the Children of Poor People in Ireland From Being a Burden to Their Parents or Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to the Public, commonly referred to as A Modest Proposal, is a Juvenalian satirical essay written and published anonymously by Jonathan Swift in 1729. Swift suggests in his essay that the impoverished Irish might ease their economic troubles by selling children as food for rich gentlemen and ladies. By doing this he mocks the authority of the British officials. A Modest Proposal is included in many literature programs as an example of early modern western satire. It also serves as an exceptional introduction to the concept and use of...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    March - the third month of the year in the Gregorian calendar brings with it the Spring Equinox and the promise of warmer days and shorter nights. Our selected poets including Swift, Yeats, Morris, Swinburne and Austin of course provide the words to match the mood. Among our readers are Richard Mitchley and Ghizela Rowe. The tracks are; March - An Introduction; A March Minstrel By Alfred Austin; A March Snow By Ella Wheeler Wilcox; In March By Archibald Lampman; My Little March Girl By Paul Laurence Dunbar; Very Early Spring By Katherine Mansfield; Four Songs For Four Seasons By Algernon Charles Swinburne; To A Daisy Found Blooming March 7th By John Hartley; Monadnock In Early Spring By...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Jonathan Swift was an Anglo-Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for the Whigs, then for the Tories), poet and cleric who became Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin. Swift is remembered for works such as Gulliver's Travels, A Modest Proposal, and others. He is regarded by the Encyclopædia Britannica as the foremost prose satirist in the English language, and is less well known for his poetry. - Summary by...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    A Modest Proposal is a satirical essay by Jonathan Swift written in 1729. It's a social commentary on British society's treatment of the poor. Saying more than this would be a spoiler! Please enjoy this unabridged and crisply narrated rendition of Swift's greatest...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Following Sterling's spectacularly successful launch of its children's classic novels (240,000 books in print to date),comes a dazzling new series: Classic Starts. The stories are unabridged and have been rewritten for younger audiences. Classic Starts treats the world's beloved tales (and children) with the respect they deserve. Through the eyes of Lemuel Gulliver, Swift’s unforgettable satire takes readers into worlds formerly unimagined. Visit four strange and remarkable lands: Lilliput, where Gulliver seems a giant among a race of tiny people; Brobdingnag, the opposite, where the natives are giants and Gulliver puny; the ruined yet magical country of...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Shipwrecked and cast adrift, English surgeon Lemuel Gulliver wakes to find himself on Lilliput, an island inhabited by little people, whose height makes their quarrels over fashion and fame seem ridiculous. His subsequent encounters-with the crude giants of Brobdingnag, the philosophical Houyhnhnms, and the brutish Yahoos-give him new, bitter insights into human behavior. Jonathan Swift's savage satire views mankind in a distorted hall of mirrors as a diminished, magnified, and finally bestial species, presenting us with an uncompromising reflection of...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    This classic book of English literature is an insightful satire on human nature, probing the corruption of man. It's also a parody on traveller's tales, as Jonathan Swift chronicles the voyages to Lilliput, Brobingnag, and other fantastical destinations in this powerful 18th-century masterpiece. Simon Cadell reads with a sure touch and great understanding of his...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    One of the most famous works in English literature, this classic enjoys enduring popularity. For generations, its sharp humor has appealed to adults, and its lively fantasy has charmed children. Gulliver's Travels relates the adventures encountered by a ship's surgeon, Lemuel Gulliver, on four remarkable voyages. The first is to Lilliput, whose inhabitants are six inches tall. The second is to Brobdingnag, whose inhabitants are 60 feet tall. The third takes Gulliver to the flying island of Laputa. His final voyage is to a land ruled by rational horses called 'Houyhnhnms,' who spoil forever Gulliver's capacity to live among ordinary mortals. Through his writings, Jonathan Swift earned fame...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Los viajes de Gulliver es una sátira en prosa, y la obra más conocida del escritor irlandés Jonathan Swift. La novela se nos presenta como la narración inconfiable de Lemuel Gulliver, un cirujano y capitán marino que ha viajado por todo el mundo, encontrándose con aventuras fantásticas e increíbles. tPrimero, las naves de Gulliver naufragan en la isla de los Liliputs, donde los habitantes miden sólo 15 centímetros de altura. Sus otros viajes lo llevan entre otros, a Brobdingnag, un país poblado por gigantes, y a Laputa, una isla voladora. Conoce a personas inmortales y caballos tan inteligentes que han domesticado a criaturas humanas de desarrollo primitivo. La novela data...read more