Searching for: "Jonathan Swift"

  • Jonathan Swift

    Penguin Classics presents Jonathan Swift's inventive classic, Gulliver's Travels, adapted for audio and now available as a digital download as part of the Penguin English Library series. Read by Hugh Laurie, star of the hit TV series House. 'Fifteen hundred of the Emperor's largest horses, each about four inches and an half high, were employed to draw me towards the Metropolis, which, as I said, was half a Mile distant' A savage and hilarious satire, Gulliver's Travels sees Lemuel Gulliver shipwrecked and adrift, subject to bizarre and unnerving encounters with, among others, quarrelling Lilliputians, philosophising horses and the brutish Yahoo tribe, that change his view of humanity...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Part I : A Voyage to Lilliput and Blefuscu - Gulliver enjoys traveling, although it is this love of travel that is his downfall. His adventure sets off in Lilliput, when after a shipwreck, he wakes up, finding himself a prisoner of a race of people one - twelfth the size of normal human beings. However, his adventure among the small people does not last long, when he has to escape the city as he is charged with treason. Part II: A Voyage to Brobdingnag - This time around Gulliver finds himself in the land of the giants, and he is one - twelfth their size. The people of Brobdingnag, find Gulliver amusing, as he is really small as compared to them, and exhibit Gulliver for money. However,...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Jonathan Swift almost defines satire in this biting and brutal pamphlet in which he suggests that poor (Catholic) Irish families should fatten up their children and sell them to the rich (Protestant) land owners, thus solving the twin problems of starving children and poverty in one blow. When the "Proposal" was published in 1729, Swift was quickly attacked, and even accused of barbarity - the exact state the "Proposal" was written to expose. (Summary by...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Shipwrecked and cast adrift, English surgeon Lemuel Gulliver wakes to find himself on Lilliput, an island inhabited by little people, whose height makes their quarrels over fashion and fame seem ridiculous. His subsequent encounters-with the crude giants of Brobdingnag, the philosophical Houyhnhnms, and the brutish Yahoos-give him new, bitter insights into human behavior. Jonathan Swift's savage satire views mankind in a distorted hall of mirrors as a diminished, magnified, and finally bestial species, presenting us with an uncompromising reflection of...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    A Tale of a Tub was the first major work written by Jonathan Swift, composed between 1694 and 1697, that was eventually published in 1704. It is arguably his most difficult satire, and perhaps his most masterly. The Tale is a prose parody which is divided into sections of "digression" and a "tale" of three brothers, each representing one of the main branches of western Christianity. A Tale was long regarded as a satire on religion itself, and has famously been attacked for that, starting with William Wotton. The "tale" presents a consistent satire of religious excess, while the digressions are a series of parodies of contemporary writing in literature, politics, theology, Biblical exegesis,...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    When Lemuel Gulliver wakes up on an island after a shipwreck, tied on his hands and feet and with arrows pointed at him, you would think all hope is lost. But his captors are the size of a finger, their rope is as thin as thread, and their tiny arrows barely break the surface of his skin. This is not even as absurd as it gets on Gulliver‘s travels at sea, but, hilariously, he has no emotional response to any of it. Jonathan Swift‘s `Gulliver‘s Travels‘ (1726) is political satire at its best. Published shortly after Daniel Defoe‘s `Robinson Crusoe‘, it offers a very different view on humankind than Defoe‘s optimistic account, poking fun and in doing so opening the door for...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Gulliver's Travels is renowned as a playful and comic children's classic. The book itself, rather than the bowdlerized versions that have been derived from it, is a savage, rude and brilliant satire, timeless in its appeal and unerringly accurate. The images of Gulliver among the miniature Lilliputians and the giants of Brobdingnag, the crazy scientists, and the rational horses create a series of novel delights and challenging...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Lemuel Gulliver, a slightly staid ship's doctor, relates the tales of his astonishing travels. He encounters the tiny, warring Lilliputians; the giant, sceptical Brobdingnagians; the ludicrously intellectual Laputans; and the idealistic - if rather stolid - Houyhnhnms and their bestial servants, the Yahoos. An immediate best-seller when it was first published in 1726, Gulliver's Travels has remained a favourite ever since. It was an attack on the politics and society of Swift's day, but it is also a polemical, inventive, surreal, vitriolic and wonderfully imaginative masterpiece, whose powerful satire continues to strike...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Set and written in 1726, This is a marvelously imaginative tale of the four voyages of Lemuel Gulliver. He finds himself shipwrecked and the prisoner of captors ranging in size from 6 inches tall to 60 feet tall and of various other persuasions. But this is just the beginning of a story written, strangely enough to satirize the foolishness and vices of modern men as they were perceived at the time. No one, young or old, can ever forget the Lilliputians and the Yahoos that starred in these wonderful and riveting stories of long ago. AUTHOR Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) was an Irish novelist, satirist, poet and political essayist. From a very literary family, his uncle married the daughter...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    This enduring classic tells of the fantastic voyages of Lemuel Gulliver, an English ship's surgeon who becomes a castaway in strange and faraway lands. Shipwrecked upon the shores of Lilliput, he encounters the six-inch-high Lilliputians, whose petty wars, civil strife, and vanities are human follies so reduced in scale as to be rendered ridiculous. From there he travels on to Brobdingnag, where he finds himself surrounded by crude giants who cannot appreciate his abstract intellect and prefer to display him as a curiosity. Further voyages take Gulliver to the floating island of Laputa, a land of intellectuals who are ignorant of practical life, and to the Island of Sorcerers, who share...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    In this humorous satire, which makes fun of English politicians in the early 1700s, you'll travel to many strange make-believe worlds. Join Gulliver as he sails from the land of the tiny six-inch people called Lilliputians and the land of the giant people called Brobdingnagians, to the land of the Houyhnhnms- where wise and understanding horses tame herds of wild Yahoos, creatures that are strangely...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    In this humorous satire, which makes fun of English politicians in the early 1700s, you'll travel to many strange make-believe worlds. Join Gulliver as he sails from the land of the tiny six-inch people called Lilliputians and the land of the giant people called Brobdingnagians, to the land of the Houyhnhnms- where wise and understanding horses tame herds of wild Yahoos, creatures that are strangely...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Travelers visit many strange places. They see very many wonderful things. When they return home they tell wonderful stories about what they have seen. Thus begin the words of Jonathan Swift's immortal Lemuel Gulliver in his witty masterpiece, Gulliver's Travels. Retold for the modern young reader while retaining all of the tongue-in-cheek charm and political satire of the original classic, the adventures of the keenly observant Gulliver in Lilliput and Brobdingnag are certain to enchant a whole new generation of...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Swift's allegorical satire about religion and politics follows the lives of three brothers, Martin, Peter and Jack, who each represent a faction of the Christian faith - Anglicanism, Roman Catholicism and the Dissenting faiths respectively. Each brother inherits a coat (representing religious practice) from their father (God) on the condition that they do not change it. But instead, the three quarrelsome youths disobey their father and change their coats beyond recognition. A Tale of a Tub was Swift's first major work and was considered a personal favourite by the...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift is a wild series of adventures widely acclaimed as "universally read" and highly influential. After a shipwreck, an Englishman discovers new, strange lands, and learns of the customs and governments of their inhabitants. This is an opportunity both for absurd humor and political satire, and the story of Lilliput may be the best example of Swift's imagination and wit. Gulliver finds himself a prisoner of a race of tiny people, the Lilliputians; they are no more than 6 inches tall, and he appears a giant to them. Soon afterwards, the spectacular giant becomes a favorite of the court, and is given a good view of the politics of the kingdom. Discover the...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Où l'on voit Lemuel Gulliver, chirurgien de marine, naviguer vers Bristol. Après un naufrage, il se retrouve sur l'île de Lilliput, dont les habitants, les Lilliputiens, ne mesurent qu'environ six pouces de haut (env. 15 cm). Plusieurs aspects de la société lilliputienne semblent bien plus avancés que l'Angleterre de l'époque, pourtant les peuples passent leur temps à faire la guerre. Après bien des aventures, Gulliver découvre l'origine de la guerre entre Lilliput et Blefuscu qui est l'île voisine : un roi a voulu imposer le côté par lequel devaient être cassés les œufs à la coque ; d'où le nom des partisans de chaque doctrine, les Gros-boutiens et les Petits-boutiens....read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift is a wild series of adventures widely acclaimed as "universally read" and highly influential. After a shipwreck, an Englishman discovers new, strange lands, and learns of the customs and governments of their inhabitants. This is an opportunity both for absurd humor and political satire, and the story of Lilliput may be the best example of Swift's imagination and wit. Gulliver finds himself a prisoner of a race of tiny people, the Lilliputians; they are no more than 6 inches tall, and he appears a giant to them. Soon afterwards, the spectacular giant becomes a favorite of the court, and is given a good view of the politics of the kingdom. Discover the...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    In 'A Modest Proposal,' first published in 1729, Jonathan Swift heaps scorn on then-current political theory and reveals the appalling suffering taking place in Ireland - not through direct reporting, but through mock suggestions on what to do with the poor; they should sell their children for food. 'The chief end I propose to myself in all my labors is to vex the world rather than divert it,' wrote Jonathan Swift in a letter to his friend Alexander Pope. Other vexing works collected here are 'Directions to Servants,' 'The Art of Political Lying,' 'A Digression Concerning the Critics,' and 'Sweetness and...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    This classic book of English literature is an insightful satire on human nature, probing the corruption of man. It's also a parody on traveller's tales, as Jonathan Swift chronicles the voyages to Lilliput, Brobingnag, and other fantastical destinations in this powerful 18th-century masterpiece. Simon Cadell reads with a sure touch and great understanding of his...read more

  • Jonathan Swift

    March - the third month of the year in the Gregorian calendar brings with it the Spring Equinox and the promise of warmer days and shorter nights. Our selected poets including Swift, Yeats, Morris, Swinburne and Austin of course provide the words to match the mood. Among our readers are Richard Mitchley and Ghizela Rowe. The tracks are; March - An Introduction; A March Minstrel By Alfred Austin; A March Snow By Ella Wheeler Wilcox; In March By Archibald Lampman; My Little March Girl By Paul Laurence Dunbar; Very Early Spring By Katherine Mansfield; Four Songs For Four Seasons By Algernon Charles Swinburne; To A Daisy Found Blooming March 7th By John Hartley; Monadnock In Early Spring By...read more