Searching for: "King James Version"

  • King James Version

    The Authorized King James Version is an English translation by the Church of England of the Christian Bible begun in 1604 and completed in 1611. First printed by the King's Printer, Robert Barker, this was the third such official translation into English; the first having been the Great Bible commissioned by the Church of England in the reign of King Henry VIII, and the second having been the Bishop's Bible of 1568. In January 1604, King James I of England convened the Hampton Court Conference where a new English version was conceived in response to the perceived problems of the earlier translations as detected by the Puritans, a faction within the Church of England. James gave the...read more

  • King James Version

    The seventeenth book of the King James Bible, Esther recounts a tale of two queens. Queen Vashti is the loveliest woman in the land, but when she refuses to come to her husband's banquet, she is banished from the kingdom. Hadassah is called to take her place - a beautiful young woman with a secret. Hadassah is Jewish, but her guardian warns her to keep her identity hidden. Taking on the name Esther - which means "hidden" - she moves in to the palace, but when a wicked man hatches a plot to rid the land of Jews, her guardian asks her to take on a terrible job. Esther must go to the king unasked - and if he does not extend his golden scepter, she will face the ultimate punishment. Can she...read more

  • King James Version (kjv)

    The 1769 Oxford Edition. The King James Bible is one of the most important books in the English speaking world, so influential that its language permeates facets of society from religion, politics, literature, art, education and...read more

  • King James Version

    The Prayer of Manasses is supposed to have been the prayer of Manasses King of Judah when he repented from his idolatrous ways when he was held captive by the Assyrians in Babylon. Manasseh's evil ways are recorded in 2 Kings 21:1-18, and the account of his repentance is recorded in 2 Chronicles 33:10-17. The Prayer of Manasses is held to be a deuterocanonical book by many Christians and is held to be Apocryphal by others. This reading is from the Holy Bible, King James Version 1611 which contains the Apocrypha separate from both the Old and New Testament. -- Summary by David...read more

  • King James Version

    Probably written by the prophet Ezra, 2 Chronicles covers the period from the beginning of King Solomon's reign to the conclusion of the Babylonian exile. Like 1 Chronicles, it focuses on the correct way to worship God. (Introduction by Joy...read more

  • King James Version

    The King James Version is an English translation of the Christian Bible begun in 1604 and first published in 1611 by the Church of England. In common with most other translations of the period, the New Testament was translated from the Textus Receptus (Received Text) series of the Greek texts. The Old Testament was translated from the Masoretic Hebrew text, while the Apocrypha [not included in this recording] was translated from the Greek Septuagint (LXX). (Summary from Wikipedia, slightly modified) This is a solo recording of Genesis, Exodus and...read more

  • King James Version

    The history of Israel from the final years of King David's life, through the reign of his son, Solomon, to the rule of King Jehoshaphat of Judah and King Ahaziah of Israel. (Summary by Joy...read more

  • King James Version

    The book of Psalms is a collection of the works of at least six authors. The book of Psalms has been a source of inspiration to all those believers who seek guidance. Apart from this they have provided comfort to those who struggle with all kinds of problems. They explore human emotions in that they uncover feelings of deep despair to ecstatic delight. It has been used as a book of prayer and as a book of praise and worship at the worship services of many churches and denominations. The writers of the Psalms seem to have a serene confidence in God’s guidance and provision. (Introduction by Pella...read more

  • King James Version

    The Book of Revelation, often known simply as Revelation or the Apocalypse, is the final book of the New Testament and occupies a central place in Christian eschatology. Written in Koine Greek, its title is derived from the first word of the text, apokalypsis, meaning "unveiling" or "revelation." The author of the work identifies himself in the text as "John" and says that he was on Patmos, an island in the Aegean, when he was instructed by a heavenly figure to write down the contents of a vision. This John is traditionally supposed to be John the Apostle, although some historical-critical scholarship reject this view. Recent scholarship has suggested other possibilities including a...read more

  • King James Version

    The book of Romans was written by Paul the Apostle on his third missionary journey. The Holy Spirit inspired Paul to write about life as a person before Christ and life as a believer after Christ. He talks about the life before Christ being impossible to live, as the flesh has dominion over a person. Gloriously bringing hope, he writes of the One who did live the impossible life, and how He now lives within the believer. Jesus becomes the new manager of their body to produce what fruit glorifies Himself. This book is so clearly pointing to the Life-giver; the believer who was once dead, may walk in newness of life, having a intimate relationship with Jesus. (Summary by Kimberly...read more

  • King James Version

    The history of the kings of Judah and Israel until their downfall. (Summary by Joy...read more

  • King James Version

    2 Chronicles was purportedly written by Ezra the scribe. It expounds the history of King Solomon and the kings came after him. It is very similar to 1 and 2 Kings, but centers primarily on the Temple as the Presence of God among the people. It is a history of the Kings of Israel. (Summary by...read more

  • King James Version

    In the Orthodox Church, during the Great Vespers of celebrated Saints, such as Saint Nicholas the Wonder-worker and the Holy Great Martyr Euphemia, selected passages are read from The Wisdom of Solomon, from the deuterocanonical books of the Holy Bible. While the translations used may be simpler, the power of the poetic verses asserts itself in the King James...read more

  • King James Version

    The introduction to the KJV Bible revealed the thanks of the translators to "TO THE MOST HIGH AND MIGHTY PRINCE JAMES, BY THE GRACE OF GOD, KING OF GREAT BRITAIN, FRANCE, AND IRELAND". It is fitting to read, as it reminds contemporary readers of the transitory nature of all Bible...read more

  • King James Version

    This performance was awarded Audio Best of the Year by Publishers Weekly. Shakespearean actor, George Vafiadis, gives a remarkable performance in the rich language of the King James version. This collection of 176 stories from both Old and New Testaments will delight readers of all ages. From Adam and Eve to the Last Supper, these stories can enlighten us, edify us, and entertain us. Stories from the Bible have been used over the centuries to teach not just Christian, but universal themes that apply to all humanity: love, brotherhood, tolerance, faith, trust. Bible stories have informed or inspired much of humanity's great literature over the years, and the stories themselves are...read more

  • King James Version

    The writer of this letter instructs the early Christians on the value of showing patience, controlling an unruly tongue and treating all people with kindness without respect to their social position. It also provides the basis for the practice of blessing the sick with an anointing of oil. The book has been historically controversial because of its teaching that both faith and works are necessary to salvation. The great promise in the book is that those who are honestly seeking wisdom may receive it by asking for divine help. Summary by Susan...read more

  • King James Version

    The Prayer of Manasseh is a short work of only 15 verses that purports to be the penitential prayer of the Judean king Manasseh, who is recorded in the Bible as one of the most idolatrous (2 Kings 21:1-18). However, after having been taken captive by the Assyrians, he prays for mercy (2 Chronicles 33:10-17) and turns from his idolatrous ways. (Summary by...read more

  • King James Version

    The Book of Jeremiah is the second of the Latter Prophets in the Hebrew Bible, following the book of Isaiah and preceding Ezekiel and the Book of the Twelve. (The order is somewhat different in the Christian Old Testament). It derives its name from, and records the visions of, Jeremiah, who lived in Jerusalem in the late 7th and early 6th centuries BCE during the time of king Josiah and the fall of the Kingdom of Judah to the Babylonians. The book can be divided into roughly 6 sections and uses poetic, narrative, and biographical genres that are interspersed throughout the book. The breakdown of sections is as follows: Chapters 1-25 (The earliest and main core of Jeremiah's...read more

  • King James Version

    The Book of Nehemiah is a book of the Hebrew Bible. Told largely in the form of a first-person memoir, it concerns the rebuilding of the walls of Jerusalem by Nehemiah, a Jew who is a high official at the Persian court, and the dedication of the city and its people to God's laws (torah). The events take place in the second half of the 5th century BCE, and together with the Book of Ezra, it represents the final chapter in the historical narrative of the Hebrew Bible. The book tells how Nehemiah, at the court of the king in Susa, is informed that Jerusalem is without walls and resolves to restore them. The king appoints him as governor of Judah and he travels to Jerusalem. There he rebuilds...read more

  • King James Version

    The Additions to Daniel comprise three chapters not found in the Hebrew/Aramaic text of Daniel. The text of these chapters is found in the Greek Septuagint and in the earlier Old Greek translation. They are accepted as canonical and translated as such in Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox Bibles. They are listed in Article VI of the Thirty-Nine Articles of the Church of England. However, most Protestant Versions exclude these passages as apocryphal, retaining only the text available today in the Hebrew/Aramaic...read more