Searching for: "Ludwig Wittgenstein"

  • Ludwig Wittgenstein

    Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus is the only book-length philosophical work published by the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein during his lifetime. He wrote it as a soldier and a prisoner of war during World War I. The slim volume (fewer than eighty pages) comprises a system of short statements, numbered 1, 1.1, 1.11, 1.12, etc., through to 7, intended to be such that 1.1 is a comment on or elaboration of 1, 1.11 and 1.12 comments on 1.1, and so forth. It is an ambitious project to identify the relationship between language and reality and to define the limits of science. (Summary from...read more

  • Ludwig Wittgenstein

    Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein (1889 - 1951) was an Austrian-British philosopher who worked primarily in logic, the philosophy of mathematics, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of language. The ‘Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus’ (Logical Philosophical Treatise or Treatise on Logic and Philosophy) is the only full-length philosophical book by the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein which was published during his lifetime. The goal of the work is to identify the relationship between language and reality and to define the limits of science. He famously summarized the book in the following way: 'What can be said at all can be said clearly; and what we cannot talk about we must...read more

  • Ludwig Wittgenstein

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  • Ludwig Wittgenstein

    The Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus is a classic work of philosophy by the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. Written during World War I, The Tractatus consists of seven propositions. In the propositions, Wittgenstein discusses language, thought, reality, and the natural...read more

  • Ludwig Wittgenstein

    Perhaps the most important work of philosophy written in the twentieth century, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus was the only philosophical work that Ludwig Wittgenstein published during his lifetime. Written in short, carefully numbered paragraphs of extreme brilliance, it captured the imagination of a generation of philosophers. For Wittgenstein, logic was something we use to conquer a reality which is in itself both elusive and unobtainable. He famously summarized the book in the following words: 'What can be said at all can be said clearly; and what we cannot talk about we must pass over in silence.' David Pears and Brian McGuinness received the highest praise for their meticulous...read more